Thursday, November 6, 2014

11/6 Skagit shores, WA greens, Navy tests, Sequim stormwater, Wynne farm, BC pipe, oil trains, BC ferries, mines

Hug my elephant, kiss my ass: Ready to govern?
Skagit shorelines feature in regional habitat restoration plans
Skagit County’s marine shoreline is imperative to the health of the greater Puget Sound and as habitat for economically and recreationally significant species like Chinook salmon. For that reason, four of 11 projects that government agencies have proposed to restore and enhance shoreline habitat in the region are aimed at river deltas along Skagit’s western edge. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

How Green Was My Election
Tom Steyer spent $57 million to get voters to care about climate change. It didn’t work. Josh Voorhees reports. (Slate) See also: Inslee Says He’s Undaunted And Optimistic About Climate Programs, Even After Election Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KPLU)

Navy to face public tonight on proposed West End electronic warfare program
Five Navy and three U.S. Forest Service officials will answer questions on the Navy's electronic warfare training plans during a public forum from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. tonight. The meeting will be in City Council chambers at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St. in Port Angeles. (Peninsula Daily News)

Stormwater master plan is under way
Peering into the future and beyond the engrained concept of “Sunny Sequim,” city officials are developing Sequim’s first stormwater master plan. Among the jurisdictions on both the Olympic and Kitsap peninsulas, Sequim is alone in its lack of a plan, program and utility fee for stormwater management. Alana Linderoth reports. (Sequim Gazette)

Wynne family at peace with major land conservation gift
A family tree farm that covers most of the upper Schneider Creek watershed northwest of Olympia has been protected permanently from development. Tom and Charlene Wynne last week completed a conservation easement with the Capitol Land Trust on 530 acres of forestland, pasture and wetlands, plus 3.5 miles of stream, ensuring the tree farm will never be sold to developers. (Olympian)

Scientists find new coral species off California
Scientists have discovered a new species of deep-sea coral in underwater canyons off the Northern California coast, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Wednesday. A NOAA research team using small submersibles found the coral in September near national marine sanctuaries off the coast of Sonoma County, the agency said. The coral from the genus  was discovered about 600 feet deep in the first intensive exploration of underwater canyons near the Gulf of Farallones and Cordell Bank national marine sanctuaries. (Seattle Times)

Kinder Morgan lawsuit protested by Burnaby Mountain anti-pipeline activists
Anti-pipeline activists held a colourful protest outside B.C. Supreme Court, as Kinder Morgan attempts to stop demonstrators opposing its survey work on Burnaby Mountain. The energy giant is in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver on Wednesday seeking an injunction to stop the protesters, and suing five people for close to $6 million for their part in opposing the Trans Mountain pipeline and terminal expansion. (CBC)

Washington Rail Safety Regulators Voice Concerns Over Oil Trains
Another group in Washington is raising concerns over whether the state’s rail infrastructure can safely support an increase in oil trains. This time it’s the state’s rail safety regulators. The state Utilities and Transportation Commission filed comments this week asking that existing track and crossings be evaluated as part of the Environmental Impact Statement for a proposed crude-by-rail terminal in Grays Harbor. Tony Schick reports. (EarthFix)

BC Ferries Nanaimo-Horseshoe Bay route will not be cut says minister
Only a day after a BC Ferries report went public identifying cuts that included the possible cancellation of service between Nanaimo, and Horseshoe Bay, B.C.Transportation Minister Todd Stone has told reporters in Victoria the route will definitely not be cut. "The B.C. government has no interest in cancelling or seeing the cancellation of the Horseshoe Bay to Departure Bay run," said Stone. (CBC)

Canadian miners pondering tougher tailings plans after Mount Polley dam collapse
The Mining Association of Canada says it is examining if changes are needed to its safety and environmental mine management program because of the collapse of Imperial Metals’ Mount Polley tailings dam. The tailings dam failure on Aug. 4 released millions of cubic metres of water and tailings containing potentially toxic metals into a Quesnel Lake watershed. Gordon Hoeksta reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST THU NOV 6 2014
GALE WARNING IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
TODAY
S WIND 25 TO 35 KT...BECOMING SW IN THE AFTERNOON. SEAS 6 TO 9 FT WITH A DOMINANT PERIOD OF 10 SECONDS... BUILDING TO 10 TO
 12 FT WITH A DOMINANT PERIOD OF 10 SECONDS IN THE AFTERNOON. RAIN IN THE MORNING...THEN SHOWERS IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W WIND 20 TO 30 KT...EASING TO 10 TO 20 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 3 TO 5 FT...SUBSIDING TO 1 TO 3 FT AFTER
 MIDNIGHT. W SWELL 13 FT AT 10 SECONDS...SUBSIDING TO 7 FT AT 10 SECONDS AFTER MIDNIGHT. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS IN THE EVENING.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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