Thursday, November 20, 2014

11/20 Coal export, Duwamish cleanup, Burnaby protest, BC LNG, Laura James, WA budget, rain garden, home toxins

Coal forecast: No need for new NW terminals
U.S. coal exports have plummeted from their 2012 peaks, making it more difficult to make the case for building new export terminals in Washington and Oregon, according to a report released Wednesday by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis. “There is simply too much port capacity in the United States, and not enough demand,” said Tom Sanzillo, the author of the report. Sanzillo forecasts that total U.S. coal exports this year may not exceed 80 million tons, down from a peak of 125.6 million tons in 2012. At that level, U.S. coal-export terminals this year would be operating at only 34 percent of capacity. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times) See also: Report questions need for coal export terminal at Fraser Surrey Docks  Wendy Stueck reports. (Globe and Mail) And also: Coal ports' critics question the economics  Floyd McKay reports. (Crosscut)

How government and Boeing fought to curtail Duwamish River cleanup
…. The Lower Duwamish Waterway Group, as the foursome of Boeing and the local governments is called, says it already has spent more than $40 million for studies and early cleanups of “hot spots” on the mega-polluted river. The Duwamish is loaded with carcinogenic PCBs and lots of other pollutants—some dumped directly by industry and some arriving via rainwater runoff from the 32-square-mile portion of the Duwamish Valley between Beacon Hill and West Seattle. Those cleanups have hauled away about half of the river bottom’s most-polluted material. Now Boeing and the three local governments want to limit how much more expensive dredging the EPA will require. Robert McClure and Kim Drury report. (Investigate West)

Kinder Morgan pipeline protesters on Burnaby Mountain now 'arrestable', say police
Police have told pipeline protesters camped out on Burnaby Mountain they are now "arrestable" for continuing to defy a court order to remove their camp. On Wednesday morning, two Burnaby RCMP officers arrived at the camp to speak to the protesters around 8 a.m. PT, but they did not arrest anyone or say when any arrests might take place. (CBC)

ExxonMobil is newest member of British Columbia LNG Alliance
An international energy giant has joined an alliance of companies that is promoting the development of a liquefied natural gas industry in northern British Columbia. ExxonMobil Canada Ltd., a subsidiary of U.S.-based energy giant Exxon Mobil Corp., says it has joined the British Columbia LNG Alliance. Current members include key international players like Chevron Canada, Shell Canada Energy, PETRONAS, and PetroleumBRUNEI. (Canadian Press)

Puget Sound diver shares clean-water mission with Skagit committee
For nearly a quarter-century, underwater videographer Laura James has plunged into the depths of Puget Sound every chance she gets to explore the water world. She says the marine life is vibrant and mesmerizing. But it is pummeled too often with litter, pollutants and mysterious disease like sea star wasting. The focal point of James’ freelance film career is to share Puget Sound’s mystique and mayhem with the people who live, work and play in the watershed. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Washington state budget outlook predicts shortfall
Washington state lawmakers are facing a projected budget gap of more than $2 billion for the next two-year budget ending in mid-2017, in large part due to a new voter-approved initiative to shrink class sizes, according to a state budget outlook released Wednesday. That projected shortfall does not include half of the expected financial obligation needed to increase funding for education as directed by the state Supreme Court, nor does it count the additional amount needed if collective bargaining agreements with state workers are approved. Rachel La Corte reports. (Associated Press)

$1.12 million rain garden project in Port Angeles nears completion
A $1.12 million stormwater project in west Port Angeles to relieve flooding and improve stormwater runoff water quality is nearly complete. The city has installed rain gardens at eight intersections on South H, K, L and M streets, as well as a new, larger drain pipe system to relieve flood problems on South H Street. Rain gardens are designed to transfer surface stormwater to groundwater by providing planted “wells” for water to pool and soak into the ground, rather than entering the stormwater system, and to provide a natural filter for surface stormwater. Arwyn Rice reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

New video by SFU prof illustrates the danger of household toxins
A professor at Simon Fraser University has been trying to warn the public about the dangers of even mild exposure to common toxins on children’s brain development, but has largely had his concerns downplayed. So he has created a video he hopes will capture greater attention. Called Little Things Matter, the video makes clear that even a small amount of toxins such as lead or PBDEs (flame retardants) in the blood — at, say, the same level as an effective dose of Ritalin — can affect brain development and negatively impact children’s IQ. (Vancouver Sun)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST THU NOV 20 2014
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL 10 AM PST THIS MORNING
TODAY
S WIND 15 TO 25 KT EASING TO 10 TO 20 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 TO 4 FT. SW SWELL 8 FT AT 10 SECONDS. SCATTERED SHOWERS.
TONIGHT
S WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 7 FT AT 13 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate
Follow on Twitter.

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told


No comments:

Post a Comment