Wednesday, November 26, 2014

11/26 Port Susan, Burnaby Mtn, oil port, BC LNG, sunk vessels, Carlsborg sewer, breed ban, coal suit, Pebble Mine, whale meat

If you like to watch: Port Susan Marine Stewardship Area
The Snohomish Marine Resources Committee recently completed a video featuring the Port Susan Marine Stewardship Area. Videographer Faith Haney interviewed farmers, MRC staff, Stillaguamish Tribe staff and Port Susan residents who have highlighted the importance of Port Susan for both people and marine resources.

Kinder Morgan Burnaby work site arrests now include 84-year-old librarian
An 84-year-old retired librarian said she was willing to violate a court injunction and go to jail, and she was arrested Tuesday as she and other anti-pipeline protesters crossed a court-ordered no-go line in Burnaby, B.C. Barbara Grant joined activists on Burnaby Mountain, east of Vancouver, to demonstrate against Kinder Morgan's proposed plan to nearly triple its pipeline capacity to transport Alberta oil to British Columbia. (CBC)

Proposed oil terminal would be biggest in volume
By any measure, the size of the proposed oil terminal at the Port of Vancouver [WA] is eye-catching. The oil-by-rail facility would handle an average of 360,000 barrels of crude per day, or up to four oil trains daily. The terminal would dwarf anything currently operating in Washington. In fact, at full capacity, the proposal known as Vancouver Energy would handle more oil by rail than any single facility in the United States, according to an analysis of crude-by-rail terminals by The Columbian. Eric Florip reports. (Columbian)

BC Ferries expects to save millions by converting largest vessels to LNG
BC Ferries plans to convert its two largest vessels to liquefied natural gas in an effort to save fuel costs after sinking $126 million into marine diesel fuel last year. The company announced Tuesday that it has the BC Ferries commissioner’s approval to upgrade the Swartz Bay-to-Tsawwassen route ships. (Canadian Press)

Petronas-led LNG project clears B.C. environmental hurdles
he B.C. government has granted environmental approval for two natural gas pipelines and Petronas’s proposed liquefied natural gas plant near Prince Rupert. The environmental assessment certificates come with a variety of conditions to mitigate the effect to local wildlife, forests and marine life. They do not necessarily mean the projects will be built, as the companies involved have yet to make final investment decisions on the multi-billion-dollar pipelines and facilities proposed as part of their LNG ambitions. Rob Shaw reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Tax dollars used to clean up floating toxic junkyards
They're left tied up to docks, pulled up on beaches and sometimes sent to the bottom of Puget Sound. When a boat becomes too expensive or too far gone to maintain, some owners simply leave them in the water. Taxpayers are picking up the bill. “At any given time we have about 150 reported to us. That number hasn't seemed to change over the years even though we've removed over 500 boats in 10 years,” said Melissa Ferris with the Washington state Department of Natural Resources. Kevin McCarty reports. (KIRO)

‘A big milestone:’ Carlsborg sewer pact approved
Clallam County and the city of Sequim have approved a long-term pact that secures wastewater treatment for the unincorporated hamlet of Carlsborg. In a joint meeting Monday night in Sequim, the Board of County Commissioners and Sequim City Council unanimously passed a 30-year interlocal agreement for the county’s use of the city’s sewer. The agreement outlines the county’s right to discharge wastewater into the city’s water reclamation facility and the city’s right to get paid for it. Rob Ollikainen reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Oregon, Washington Prison Inmates Enlisted To Help Endangered Plants & Animals
In a growing number of Northwest prisons, inmates are rearing endangered plants, butterflies, turtles and frogs for release in the wild. It started just over a decade ago at a minimum security prison near Olympia. Now inmates at four Washington prisons and three in Oregon are raising dozens of different types of plants, insects and animals to use in restoration, many of them rare or endangered. Tom Kaye directs the Institute for Applied Ecology, one of the partners in the Oregon Sustainability in Prisons Project. He said the advantages of working in prisons outweigh the security complications. Tom Banse reports. (Northwest News Network)

Paul Allen bankrolls federal lawsuit to limit coal mining
Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen is making a big investment in fighting climate change, by bankrolling a lawsuit that aims to limit coal mining on federal lands. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday by Friends of the Earth and the Western Organization of Resource Councils against the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM), is being completely financed by the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. Steve Wilhelm reports. (Puget Sound Business Journal)

Judge puts brakes on EPA’s action against Alaska’s Pebble Mine
A federal judge has issued a preliminary injunction blocking the Environmental Protection Agency from taking action against a massive Alaska mining project that the agency says could be catastrophic for the best run of wild salmon remaining on the planet. Fishermen in Washington state and Alaska, along with tribal groups, environmentalists, chefs and even jewelers have fought the proposed Pebble Mine for years and thought it dead. But the ruling gives at least some temporary hope to the Canadian developers of the project. The ruling by Judge Russel Holland stops the EPA from taking action until he makes a decision on Pebble’s lawsuit claiming the agency broke the law to stop the mine. Sean Cockerham reports. (McClatchy)

Cetacean breeding ban for Vancouver Aquarium fails to pass at park board
It was a tense meeting [Monday] night at the Vancouver Park Board as the controversial issue of cetaceans in captivity was once again on the agenda. In July, the Vision Vancouver-dominated board voted to ban the breeding of whales and dolphins in captivity at the Vancouver Aquarium, but didn't pass the bylaw amendment before the municipal election earlier this month. The incoming NPA commissioners, who will dominate the park board in the new year, have already promised to kill the proposal to ban cetacean breeding. Nevertheless at the outgoing board's last meeting Monday night before the new board takes over next year, outgoing commissioner Sarah Blyth tried to push through a vote on the ban….. In the end Blyth's motion was defeated, but the board did pass a motion to require a review of the aquarium's policy of cetaceans in captivity next year. (CBC)

Greenpeace seeks to halt shipments of whale meat through Canada
Greenpeace activists on Tuesday delivered a petition with more than 65,000 signatures to Port Metro Vancouver urging the federal agency to refuse future shipments of endangered fin whale meat. Larry Pynn reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Now, your tug weather--
 WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST WED NOV 26 2014
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
 GALE WARNING IN EFFECT FROM THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH LATE TONIGHT
TODAY
SW WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 8 FT AT 11 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY.
TONIGHT
S WIND 25 TO 35 KT...BECOMING SW 20 TO 30 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. SEAS 6 TO 9 FT WITH A DOMINANT PERIOD OF 10 SECONDS.
 RAIN.
THU
SW WIND 20 TO 30 KT. WIND WAVES 3 TO 5 FT. SW SWELL 9 FT AT 11 SECONDS. RAIN.
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