Friday, August 29, 2014

8/29 Frog ESA, Lulu & Indigo, transient orcas, Mukilteo terminal, Shell drill, sockeye, GBH

(PHOTO: Vince Patton/OPB)
Oregon Spotted Frog Listed Under Endangered Species Act
The Oregon spotted frog, once abundant in the Northwest, now lives in a few scattered wetlands across the region. Over the years, it’s lost up to 90 percent of its habitat. Now, the frog will receive protection under the Endangered Species Act as a threatened species. Courtney Flatt reports. (EarthFix)

From Orca Network: "We're saddened to report that the Center for Whale Research has announced that two Southern Resident orcas, L53 Lulu and L100 Indigo, have not been seen with their families in 2014 and are presumed deceased. 37-year-old female L53 lost her mother, L7, in 2010, and had no siblings. L100, a 13-year-old male, was born to L54 Ino and had two siblings, L108, an 8-year-old brother, and L117, born in 2010, gender still unknown. This brings the Southern Residents' overall population down to 78, the same number that led to their listing as endangered under the ESA. No newborns have been seen since August, 2012."

Transient orca sightings hit all-time high in Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca
It’s been a record summer for whale watching as the “transient” orca’s have been hanging out and putting on quit the show here in the Puget Sound region. “Never in recorded history has there been more sightings of transient orcas in the Sound and Strait,” the Pacific Whale Watch Association reported Thursday. The transient orcas are “marine mammal-eating transient orcas, also known as Bigg’s orcas” the association explains in it news release. And, our resident friends are the “fish-eating Southern Resident orcas of the Salish Sea.” Jake Ellison reports. (SeattlePI.Com)

New Mukilteo ferry terminal clears key hurdle
A key federal agency has given its blessing to the building of a new ferry terminal in Mukilteo. Washington State Ferries announced Thursday it had received a “record of decision” from the Federal Transit Administration that signals completion of the lengthy environmental review process for the $129 million project. The decision, issued Aug. 22, represents the last major bureaucratic hurdle the state needed to clear in order to move ahead with final design and construction of the new terminal roughly one-third mile east of the existing one. Jerry Cornfield reports. (Everett Herald)

Warm waters send millions of salmon to Canada, not Wash.
Unusually warm water off the Washington coast is sending the vast majority of the sockeye-salmon run to Canadian waters, leaving Puget Sound fishermen with nearly empty nets. (Associated Press)

Shell submits a plan for new Alaskan Arctic oil exploration
After years of legal and logistical setbacks and dogged opposition from environmentalists, Royal Dutch Shell submitted a plan to the federal government Thursday, Aug. 28, to try once again to explore for oil in the Alaskan Arctic. The company emphasized that it had not made a final decision on whether to drill or not next summer but that the filing with the Interior Department preserved its options. Shell says the program consists of two drilling rigs working simultaneously in the Chukchi Sea, which has the potential to produce more than 400,000 barrels of oil a day. Clifford Krause reports. (NY Times)

Sound Salmon Solutions, a local nonprofit dedicated to salmon recovery efforts, invites you to join in the Citizen Action Training School (CATS) in Everett, a 12-week training program in watershed and Puget Sound ecology. CATS also, focuses on civic engagement in the legal and regulatory  processes that affect resource management. Apply by Sept. 5 at www.pugetsoundcats.org.

Olympia coalition spearheads effort to protect great blue herons and West Bay
A new nonprofit organization was established this month to help protect Olympia’s lone colony of great blue herons. The Olympia Coalition for Ecosystems Preservation also launched an online petition titled Save the West Bay Woods. As of Thursday afternoon, 143 people had signed the petition, which calls on the city to conserve the West Bay woods and Schneider Creek basin. The coalition formed in response to the proposed Wells Townhomes on the city’s west side. The development has attracted opposition Andy Hobbs reports. (Olympian)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
 WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 247 AM PDT FRI AUG 29 2014
TODAY
SW WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING NW IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS. SLIGHT CHANCE OF
 SHOWERS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT...BECOMING S AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 10 SECONDS. SLIGHT CHANCE OF
 SHOWERS AFTER MIDNIGHT.
SAT
SW WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 10 SECONDS...BUILDING TO 5 FT AT 10 SECONDS IN THE AFTERNOON. A
 CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...BECOMING SW 5 TO 15 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 5 FT AT 11 SECONDS.
SUN
SW WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
SUN NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 2 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
MON
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT.

--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Thursday, August 28, 2014

8/28 Puffins, breeding ban, Lummi fishing, Kinder Morgan, BNSF tank cars, threatened coral, James Is.

(PHOTO: Alan Berner/Seattle Times)
Puffin chicks at the Seattle Aquarium
It's the first time in 14 years that puffins have given birth at the aquarium, and within 10 days, two chicks were born to two different mated pairs. Courtney Riffkin writes. Alan Berner's photos. (Seattle Times)

Vancouver Aquarium files legal challenge to whale, dolphin breeding ban
The Vancouver Aquarium has filed a legal challenge seeking to overturn a Vancouver Park Board resolution to ban the breeding of whales and dolphins at the popular Stanley Park tourist attraction…. In a petition filed in B.C. Supreme Court, the aquarium claims the board's decision falls outside its jurisdiction as a municipal body. The aquarium says the resolution interferes with its day-to-day operations. (CBC)

Lummi fishing rights south of San Juans remain uncertain
Lummi Nation won a legal battle over fishing rights that have been contested for more than 20 years, but the tribe's right to fish south of the San Juan Islands is still uncertain. A federal court of appeals on Aug. 19 reversed a lower court decision that had barred the Lummis from fishing west of northern Whidbey Island. The court ruled the boundaries of the "usual and accustomed grounds and stations" for fishing, as described in the 1855 Treaty of Point Elliott, remained unclear. The case could be brought again by the S'Klallam tribes, which were challenging Lummi Nation in the case. Ralph Schwartz reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Trans Mountain Pipeline survey work to start today on Burnaby Mountain
Kinder Morgan plans to begin survey work at the foot of Burnaby Mountain today (Wednesday) for its planned expansion of the Trans Mountain Pipeline. The Texas oil giant wants to triple the existing pipeline's capacity. The proposed $5.4 billion  project would mean an additional 590,000 barrels of oil passing through several Metro Vancouver municipalities each day. (CBC) See also: Give capital region a say on pipeline, says Victoria Mayor Dean Fortin  Bill Cleverley reports. (Times Colonist)

Top BNSF rail executive says safer tanker car can greater lower risk of oil-by-rail disasters
Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway’s executive chairman Matthew Rose says his company wants safer ways to haul volatile oil by rail from the Bakken fields of North Dakota to refineries and terminals in Washington and around the country that have seen rapidly increasing traffic since 2011. BNSF, the nation’s largest railroad and hauler of oil by rail, has pledged to buy 5,000 future oil tank cars, which don’t yet exist. But prototypes of the third-generation tanker have been built, and await federal approval before being mass produced and deployed on a large scale, Rose said in an interview in Seattle this week. Brad Shannon reports. (Olympian)

Feds protect 20 species of coral threatened by climate change
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration looked at listing 66 species of coral but listed only 20 for various reasons. All are called threatened, not endangered. Two coral species were already listed. Seth Borenstein reports. (Associated Press)

James Island's former owner must pay $4.75M for pollution cleanup
The former owner of James Island must pay $4.75 million to the property’s current owner for work done to clean up contamination resulting from its historic use as an explosives manufacturing site. PPG Architectural Coatings Canada Inc. (previously ICI Canada Inc.) had carried out environmental remediation prior to selling the island. The present owner, J.I. Properties Inc., claimed $5.3 million to cover its 2004-2006 costs to upgrade the property, located off the east side of the Saanich Peninsula. The 780-acre island is for sale at $75 million. Carla Wilson reports. (Times Colonist)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 252 AM PDT THU AUG 28 2014
TODAY
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

8/27 Sea star wasting, free Elwha, spill risk study, Vic sewer, no-swim new beach

(PHOTO: Donna Fabian)
Signs of sea-star recovery in California but not in NW
The sea-star population, devastated by a wasting disease, shows signs of resurgence in California but not necessarily in Washington. Caitlin Cruz reports. (Seattle Times)

Only debris left to clean up as Elwha River is free to travel its own path
The Elwha River is free. The final 30-foot section of the Glines Canyon Dam was destroyed by an explosion at 4:12 p.m. Tuesday when crews with Barnard Construction Inc. of Bozeman, Mont., detonated charges at the site. Arwyn Rice reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Kinder Morgan pipeline spill simulation to predict environmental risk
The potential spread of a possible oil spill from the proposed Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline is being assessed today by a simulated spill in the Fraser River and Burrard Inlet. The simulation — created by a team from the City of Vancouver and environmental organizations, Raincoast Conservation Foundation and the Georgia Strait Alliance — drops biodegradable yellow plywood cards in the waters of the Fraser River and tracks their drift on a map, in order to show the potential reach of a pipeline oil spill. (CBC)

Put sewage issue on the ballot, Esquimalt councillor says
Esquimalt Coun. Tim Morrison believes the township’s residents are solidly behind his council’s unanimous rejection of a regional sewage treatment plant at McLoughlin Point, and he wants to give them a chance to prove it. Morrison has called for three questions to be included on Esquimalt’s Nov. 15 municipal ballot, including one asking whether residents support Esquimalt council’s decision to reject the Capital Regional District’s zoning application for a sewage plant. Bill Cleverley reports. (Times Colonist)

New Westminster beach opens - but you can't swim in the water
There is a new sandy beach by the Fraser River in New Westminster, B.C., but visitors cannot swim in the water. The beach on Timber Wharf at Westminster Pier Park is between three and four metres above the water. (CBC)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 247 AM PDT WED AUG 27 2014
TODAY
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING NW 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 11 SECONDS. PATCHY FOG THIS
 MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 16 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Tuesday, August 26, 2014

8/26 Beach rules, Decker Glacier, dolphin flips, train traffic, Kimberly-Clark, free Elwha


(PHOTO: Laurie MacBride)
Golden Hour Geese
Laurie MacBride in Eye on Environment writes: '“Golden Hour” ends early on midsummer mornings, and I’m not the morning person I used to be (especially during vacation). So when we’re off boating, the embarrassing reality is that by the time I’m ready to set out in my kayak or dinghy for a paddling excursion or a walk ashore, I’ve usually missed those glorious opportunities to capture nature in the soft light of early morning….'

Waterfront development: Will new rules harm fish, Puget Sound?
Rewriting rules of the beach, the state Department of Fish and Wildlife is at odds with citizen watchdogs. But the department's "customers" may be happy. Bob Simmons reports. (Crosscut)

Decker Glacier lake at Whistler a sign of melt to come
Anyone hiking in the Coast Mountains off the B.C. coast this summer may have noticed some dramatic changes to the landscape. Last weekend, for instance, B.C. lawyer Jason Krupa hiked back to a spot near Blackcomb Mountain where he snapped a view of the Decker Glacier eight years ago. What was cold white in 2006 is now a stunning blue." (CBC)

If you like to watch: Boaters wowed by dolphin’s backward backflips in Puget Sound
TACOMA, Wash — Some boaters were treated to feats of dolphin acrobatics over the weekend near Point Defiance…. The Puget Sound is home to the Harbor porpoise, Dall’s porpoise and the Pacific white-sided dolphin. (KCPQ)

S-W resists coal train option
Sedro-Woolley officials are not pleased with BNSF Railway’s announcement that more trains may be routed their way as northbound rail transport increases, with or without the proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal at Cherry Point north of Bellingham. The fact that the trains may be coal trains isn’t the issue, they say. Trains move slowly through the city, which means more traffic delays and emergency response holdups. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald) See also: Acme residents: Coal trains expected but not welcome in south fork  Ralph Schwartz reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Everett sues Kimberly-Clark over condition of mill site
The city has filed a lawsuit against Kimberly-Clark Corp. over the company's failure to cover its former waterfront pulp-mill site with topsoil. When the company shut down the mill in 2012 and received a permit to demolish buildings on the site, it was with the stipulation that the rubble be covered with topsoil and that grass be planted to contain pollution on the site, the city says. Chris Winters reports. (Everett Herald)

Glines Canyon Dam's final blast scheduled for today
The final blast at Glines Canyon Dam is expected to take place today, Olympic National Park has announced. Crews with Barnard Construction Inc. of Bozeman, Mont., will place the explosives today and set off what may be the last blast of the $325 million Elwha River restoration project, Barb Maynes, spokeswoman for the national park, said Monday. (Peninsula Daily News) See also: Rafting The Dam-Free Elwha  Ashley Ahearn reports. (EarthFix)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 254 AM PDT TUE AUG 26 2014
TODAY
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 4 FT AT 8 SECONDS. PATCHY FOG IN THE MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 4 FT AT 8 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG AFTER MIDNIGHT.

--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Monday, August 25, 2014

8/25 Quake, Polley spill, BNSF track, sockeye, netted orca, Whatcom shellfish, Edward Curtis, Capitol Lake

(USGS)
New quake map shows Northwest at high risk
A new federal earthquake map dials up the shaking hazard just a bit for about one-third of the United States and lowers it for one-tenth. In July, the U.S. Geological Survey updated its national seismic hazard maps for the first time since 2008, taking into account research from the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the Japanese coast and the surprise 2011 Virginia temblor. (KING) See also: Would Seattle’s viaduct survive an earthquake today?  (KCPQ) And also: California quake a reminder to expect B.C.'s 'Big One'  (CBC)

Mount Polley spill: Testing finds elevated selenium in fish
Fish from Quesnel Lake and Polley Lake, downstream from the Mount Polley mine spill, have elevated levels of selenium, arsenic and copper among other elements, but there is no threat to human health, according to the B.C.  government. The fish tissue analyzed shows an elevated level of selenium in the livers and gonads that exceed guidelines for human consumption. But the province says the elevated levels are similar to those found in the lakes before the spill. (CBC) See also: Health officials say blue sheen from Mount Polley tailings pond breach likely organic Tiffany Crawford reports. (Vancouver Sun)

BNSF plans to add tracks north, south of Ferndale
To relieve congestion that will come with more trains carrying coal and other cargo, BNSF Railway expects to lay four miles of track along existing rail north of Ferndale, a company official said. The work has not yet received state approval, but Gus Melonas, public affairs director for BNSF, said new track from Ferndale High School north to Custer is scheduled to be added in 2015. The second line will be long enough for two full-length coal or oil trains to move aside and allow higher-priority passenger trains to pass. BNSF also is preparing to lay a second track along its line between Bellingham and Ferndale, covering about four miles from near Wynn Road in Marietta, north almost to Main Street in Ferndale. Ralph Schwartz reports. (Bellingham Herald)

'Warm blob' keeps possible record sockeye run away from U.S. waters
In a development that has left local fishermen scratching their heads, it appears an unusually warm section of ocean water is helping send nearly the entire sockeye salmon run into Canadian fishing waters this season. According to data from the Pacific Salmon Commission through Tuesday, Aug. 19, in recent weeks about 99 percent of the sockeye salmon has gone through the Johnstone Strait around the northern part of Vancouver Island into Canadian waters. That's made a big difference in who is catching the fish: Nearly 2.9 million sockeye salmon have been caught in Canadian waters, while the U.S. fishermen had caught around 98,000 through Aug. 19. Dave Gallagher reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Killer whale pod rallies around orca trapped in fisherman's net
A young killer whale is trapped in a fisherman's net. A pod of distressed whales cries out frantically as the youngster struggles to get free. Sightseers aboard a whale-watching boat that arrives to help are stunned at what they see. "It's a very rare thing," said Nicole Mackay, co-owner of Port McNeill-based Mackay Whale Watching. "I never want to see it again." While she was out on on the water with customers near Port Hardy Thursday morning, a fisherman radioed Comox coast guard asking for help because a whale had become entangled in his net. Rhiannon Coppin reports. (CBC)

Most northern Whatcom County beaches safe for shellfish harvesting
Beaches in northern Whatcom County have been reopened to recreational shellfish harvesting after the biotoxin that causes diarrhetic shellfish poisoning has dropped to safe levels. The Whatcom County Health Department has lifted the ban on beaches from Point Whitehorn north to the Canadian border, excluding Point Roberts. Point Roberts and all beaches south of Point Whitehorn remain closed to recreational harvest of molluscan shellfish because biotoxin levels remain unsafe. Kie Relyea reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Oregon Approves Subsidies For Oil Transport, Not For Coal
The Oregon Transportation Commission voted Friday to approve nearly $5 million in subsidies for rail and dock infrastructure tied to controversial coal export and oil-by-rail projects. The subsidies were recommended as part of a $42.3 million package of transportation funding through the ConnectOregon program. The program leverages state lottery dollars to pay for transportation projects such as airport runway upgrades, railroad improvements and dock expansions. Tony Schick and Cassandra Profita reports. (EarthFix)

Our History: Recapturing the glory of a people
The American photographer and ethnologist Edward Curtis spent almost 30 years compiling a 20-volume work documenting the vanishing traditional world of the native people of western North America. In Edward S. Curtis Above the Medicine Line, Victoria author and publisher Rodger Touchie delves into the years Curtis spent from 1909 to 1924 studying the tribes of the British Columbia coast, whom he considered among the most fascinating he encountered. (Times Colonist)

Lake reflects our inability to make hard choices
Invasive species flourish where conditions for reproduction are optimal and no predators discourage them from choking out native species. New Zealand Mud Snails have invaded Capitol Lake and closed it while at the same paralyzing a management process that was already grinding to a halt due to political pressure….. The reflection of the Capitol dome—the original purpose for depriving the Deschutes River of its estuary—becomes increasingly more difficult to see. For a state whose leaders frequently proclaim their desire to restore endangered salmon and return Puget Sound to health, the irony of Capitol Lake in its current condition literally under the noses of those who have power to remedy the situation offers a pungent counterpoint. John Rosenberg writes. (Olympian)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT MON AUG 25 2014
TODAY
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING NW TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 4 FT AT 7 SECONDS. AREAS OF DENSE FOG IN THE MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT IN THE EVENING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 7 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, August 22, 2014

8/22 Eleanor Stopps, Vancouver coal, Hood Canal tour, Seattle tribal heritage, Everett port, coal economics

Tony Angel (Port Townsend Leader)
Sculpture dedicated in honor of Eleanor Stopps
“Courting Pigeon Guillemots,” a bronze sculpture commissioned to honor Eleanor Stopps’ tireless work to save Protection Island for nesting seabirds, was dedicated in front of Port Townsend's Northwest Maritime Center on Aug. 14. Tony Angell, writer, environmental educator and the sculptor of the piece spoke at the vent. Two Port Townsend women, Robin Ornelas and Jan Halliday spent more than two years raising money to commission and purchase the sculpture of Stopps’ favorite seabirds, and then presented the sculpture to the City of Port Townsend. (from the Port Townsend Leader)

Port Metro Vancouver okays controversial coal shipping facility at Fraser Surrey docks (updated)
Port Metro Vancouver has approved a controversial $15-million coal-loading facility at Fraser Surrey Docks despite concerns for human health and the environment. Peter Xotta, the port's vice-president of planning and operations, told a news conference Thursday that a review by Golder Associates concluded "there are no significant adverse environmental effects, including health effects," that cannot be mitigated. But Dr. Paul Van Buynder, chief medical health officer for the Fraser Health Authority, said he and other regional health experts were not consulted. Larry Pynn reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Natural Resources tour of Hood Canal easement area raises 'pit-to-pier' firm's ire
A tour to tell members of the press about a conservation easement between the state and the Navy came under fire from a representative of a company that has filed a lawsuit asking for the pact to be nullified. Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark led the 90-minute tour of the area aboard the Dawnbreaker, a state Department of Natural Resources vessel, with two print and four television journalists Wednesday. Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Seattle’s waterfront park to reflect region’s rich tribal heritage
….[W]ith the Alaskan Way Viaduct slated for demolition and the city planning for a new waterfront park from Pioneer Square to the Olympic Sculpture Park, city officials have begun reaching out to local Indian tribes to involve them in the design and to incorporate their history and culture into the finished park. Lynn Thompson reports. (Seattle Times)

Port clears way for waterfront development
Five docks, 700 creosote-treated pilings and about 11,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment. The Port of Everett is launching the final phase of a cleanup of its central waterfront property. This part of the project is expected to cost $6.2 million…. After the cleanup, the Port will be able to move ahead with its ambitious Waterfront Place project, which mixes commercial and residential space and opens up trails and other open space along the water. Jim Davis reports. (Everett Herald)

Coal Opponents Point To Weak Finances Of Company Behind Proposed Terminals
Oregon regulators’ rejection of a proposed coal export terminal on the Columbia River is just the latest hurdle for the energy company behind it, according to anti-coal activists. The activists are asking Washington officials to consider Ambre Energy’s finances before allowing a terminal it’s involved in at Longview, Washington.  Ambre Energy is the main investor in the Morrow-Pacific export terminal proposed in Oregon. It also has a 62 percent stake in the Longview proposal. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KPLU) See also: Do coal exports pencil out? Opponents push the financial case Steve Wilhelm reports. (Puget Sound Business Journal)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 633 AM PDT FRI AUG 22 2014
TODAY
SW WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING NW IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS. AREAS OF MORNING FOG WITH VISIBILITIES OF 1 NM OR LESS.
TONIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
SAT
VARIABLE WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 7 SECONDS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT...BECOMING SW TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 4 FT AT 7 SECONDS.
SUN
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. NW SWELL 3 FT AT 7 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter.

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Thursday, August 21, 2014

8/21 Smelt fishing regs, Everett waterfront, BNSF east county track, Vancouver oil terminal, PSE LNG

Seal, before (Alaska Adventures/CBC)
If you like to watch: Killer whale flips 'sea lion' into air in YouTube video
…. Cetacean expert Paul Spong with OrcaLab said he believes the whale's prey may have been a seal rather than a sea lion, but agrees the video is remarkable, because humans don't often see how whales hunt. (CBC)

New Puget Sound smelt fishing regulations in effect
Anglers are reminded there are new recreational and commercial smelt fishing regulations in effect for Puget Sound. The new rules, adopted by the state Fish and Wildlife Commission in June, will give more protection to smelt populations, which are a key food source for a variety of species in Puget Sound, according to a agency news release. Jeffrey P. Mayor reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Everett waterfront to get massive makeover
The Port of Everett will announce plans Thursday to convert the fading industrial waterfront into a series of new mixed-use communities. Waterfront Place is the name for the centerpiece which will boast four miles of walking a bike paths, five restaurants, and 350 new homes overlooking Puget Sound. Gary Chittim reports. (KING)

BNSF: East county tracks a good alternative to Bellingham for coal trains
Not only are there no current plans to build a 1.6-mile railroad siding in the city to accommodate coal trains for a proposed terminal at Cherry Point, the terminal won't need a siding, a BNSF Railway official said. In a reversal of a statement the company made in 2011, coal-train traffic can be routed to avoid Bellingham and go through Sumas instead, said Courtney Wallace, regional director of public affairs for BNSF. BNSF has spent "several million dollars" on the Sumas route this year, replacing ties and resurfacing the track, Wallace said. The route follows Highway 9 from Sumas through Nooksack, Deming, Van Zandt and Acme. Ralph Schwartz reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Oil terminal review process extended
The state panel reviewing a proposal for an oil-by-rail transfer terminal in Vancouver agreed Tuesday to extend to early next year the timeline for completing a review of the proposal and for making a recommendation to Gov. Jay Inslee. The decision by the Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council, which was expected, adds six months to a review process that includes an environmental impact examination, judicial hearings and a recommendation to Inslee. That moves the deadline for a recommendation to March 2, 2015. Aaron Corvin reports. (Vancouver Columbian)

Puget Sound Energy to build Washington’s first LNG fueling station at Port of Tacoma
The Port of Tacoma could become the site of yet another natural gas plant if Port of Tacoma commissioners approve a lease Thursday (Aug. 21) with Puget Sound Energy for a tract on the Hylebos Waterway. The 30-acre site at East 11th Street and Alexander Avenue could become a liquified natural gas conversion and storage site if PSE’s plans pass environmental reviews. The utility estimates the new facility will cost $275 million and create 150 union construction jobs over the three-year construction period. The facility would open in 2018. Once open, the plant would employ 18 workers. John Gille reports. (Tacoma News Tribune)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT THU AUG 21 2014
TODAY
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter.

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told