Tuesday, June 30, 2015

6/30 Jim Toomey, state budget, BC LNG ships, Colstrip, EPA mercury, plastic bag ban

(Jim Toomey/San Juan Preservation Trust)
If you like to watch: "Islands are Different" and "Shorelines: Connecting Land & Salmon"
The San Juan Preservation Trust enlisted Jim Toomey, a marine conservationist and creator of the internationally-syndicated comic strip “Sherman’s Lagoon”, to help answer the question: what does protecting land have to do with salmon? The result: two short, entertaining videos.

Legislature approves budget that cuts tuition, funds state worker raises
State lawmakers have approved a new two-year spending plan that will cut college tuition, give teachers cost-of-living raises and help satisfy a court order that the state fully fund public schools. The state Senate passed the $38.2 billion budget Monday evening on a 38-10 vote, and the state House approved the spending plan shortly afterward, 90-8. Lawmakers were racing to pass the budget to avoid a partial shutdown of state government Wednesday. The measure now goes to the desk of Gov. Jay Inslee, who must sign it by the end of the day Tuesday to avoid lapses in state services and temporary layoffs of state workers. Melissa Santos and Jordan Schrader report. (Tacoma News Tribune)

Trudeau open to LNG ships on northern B.C. coast
Federal Liberal leader Justin Trudeau said Monday his mind is closed to oil tankers plying the waters of northern B.C. but open to shipping of liquefied natural gas as well as increased oil tanker traffic through Port Metro Vancouver — on the condition proper reviews are conducted. In an interview with The Vancouver Sun, Trudeau said that the Harper Conservative government could have saved everyone a lot of time and trouble by nixing the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, emphasizing “the Great Bear Rainforest is not a place for an oil pipeline.” Larry Pynn reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Coal plant operator says Colstrip remains profitable for now
The formation of a new company to run Montana's largest power plant has raised questions among analysts and plant detractors about how long it can keep going, as pollution control costs rise and coal's share of the electricity market crumbles. The plant's new operator has an answer: There are no plans to shut down the 2,100-megawatt Colstrip Steam Electric Station. Matthew Brown reports. (Associated Press)

Supreme Court: EPA erred in rule on toxic emissions from power plants
The Supreme Court dealt a major blow Monday to the Obama administration’s efforts to keep toxic mercury out of the nation’s air and waterways, saying U.S. officials failed to properly consider economic costs when they imposed expensive pollution controls on coal-burning power plants. The court, in a 5-to-4 decision, halted further implementation of the 2011 Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, the Environmental Protection Agency’s landmark regulation that required electric utilities to reduce mercury pollution, linked in multiple studies to respiratory illnesses as well as birth defects and developmental problems in children. The decision’s ultimate impact on pollution controls was uncertain. The justices declined to strike down the rule altogether and left open the possibility that the regulation could be altered and reinstated. Moreover, a sizable majority of the country’s coal-burning utilities already have taken steps to meet the EPA’s requirements, muting the decision’s practical effects, at least in the near term. Joby Warrick and Robert Barnes report. (Washington Post)

PAC wants to pay to put plastic bag ban on Lacey ballot
Will Lacey take the money? That’s the question facing Lacey City Council after a local group called on the council last Thursday to support their cause. The group, a political action committee called the Effective Self-Governance Association of Thurston County, is prepared to write a check to the city for $2,500 to pay to get a city plastic bag ban before voters this November. After the representative made her pitch Thursday night, Councilman Jason Hearn made a motion to accept the money and to put the issue on the fall ballot. His motion won support from Councilman Lenny Greenstein, but Mayor Andy Ryder quickly put the brakes on the discussion, saying it would be an unprecedented move for the city to take the money. Rolf Boone reports. (Olympian)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT TUE JUN 30 2015
TODAY
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 4 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
SW WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. NW SWELL 5 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Monday, June 29, 2015

6/29 Drought, Navy in Hood Canal, geoducks, conservation fund, humpbacks, gas tax, McTaggart Cowan

Don Moyer’s Sketchbook
(moyersketchbook.blogspot.com/2013/07/fish.html)
Running dry: Drought sparks concerns over fish survival
The mountains are bare. The streams are low. The banks of the Skagit River are exposed…. This year’s drought will be worse than the last statewide drought in 2005, and the region’s fisheries are expected to suffer. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald) See also: Warming Northwest Rivers Raise Risk Of Fish Kills  Courtney Flatt reports. (EarthFix) And also: B.C. heat wave sparks worries about wildfires, water supplies and fish habitats Gemma Karstens-Smith reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Navy stealthily targets Hood Canal development
The U.S. Navy has quietly restricted development across thousands of acres of water and land near Hood Canal in western Puget Sound. Last year, in the name of national security, the Navy may have gone too far. Will Drabold reports. (Seattle Times)

Harvesting geoducks is lucrative, but it's also brutally hard work
The sound of labored breathing crackles over the radio aboard the fishing boat Rawdeal on an overcast morning in late May. Anchored about 100 yards off the eastern coastline of Whidbey Island, within sight of the Clinton ferry landing, the crew on the 26-foot aluminum fishing boat is after geoduck. The giant clams, which grow wild in the Pacific Northwest, are pound for pound the most-valuable seafood being harvested from Puget Sound today. Ian Terry reports. (Everett Herald)

Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund gets tangled in politics
Two members of the Washington’s congressional delegation — Reps. Derek Kilmer, D-Gig Harbor, and Dave Reichert, R-Auburn — are expressing confidence that the Land and Water Conservation Fund will be reauthorized. But with so many dollars on the line for conservation purposes, many supporters are growing nervous about when it will happen and what the final bill will look like. After all, what could possibly go wrong in a Congress famous for getting nothing done, with less than 100 days left to go before the law expires? Chris Dunagan reports. (Watching Our Water Ways)

Humpback whale entanglement an international problem
Four humpback whales have been found entangled in fishing gear in the last two weeks, with one near Powell River effectively "hog-tied" and anchored to the ocean floor, says Fisheries and Oceans Canada. "It was amazing how wrapped up it was. The tail had significant wraps, loose rope and ends all over. Then it was actually up, underneath the body, through the mouth three times," said Paul Cottrell, Marine Mammals Coordinator, and lead whale disentangler for Fisheries and Oceans Canada. (CBC)

Lawmakers reach deal on gas tax increase, transportation funding
State lawmakers have reached a deal to raise the gas tax to pay for highway improvements, with leaders from both parties saying they’re optimistic lawmakers will approve a package by Tuesday. Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday that he would accept a deal even if it restricts his ability to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from gasoline and diesel fuel — wiping out the biggest point of contention on the highway and mass-transit package. Jordan Schrader and Melissa Santos report. (Olympian)

Ecologist’s archive offers a glimpse of B.C. wilderness
A lifetime of material compiled by Ian McTaggart Cowan — known as the “father of Canadian ecology” — has found a home at the University of Victoria. McTaggart Cowan, who died in 2010 at the age of 99, came to Canada from Scotland with his family at age three and grew up in North Vancouver. He was UVic’s chancellor from 1979 to 1984, taught for 35 years at the University of B.C. and worked at what is now the Royal B.C. Museum. Jeff Bell reports. (Times Colonist)

If you like to watch: First Nations war-canoe races return to Victoria's harbour
The first war-canoe race in more than 100 years took place place Saturday in Victoria's Inner Harbour. Five First nations from across Vancouver Island kicked off the event with traditional dances and ceremonial blessings. (CBC)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT MON JUN 29 2015
TODAY
W WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING NW 10 TO 20 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS...BUILDING TO 1 TO 3 FT IN THE
 AFTERNOON. W SWELL 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...BECOMING 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS.

--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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http://salishseanews.blogspot.com/

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http://salishseacommunications.blogspot.com/2011/10/salish-sea-communications-truth-well.html

Friday, June 26, 2015

6/26 BC pipe, oil export rules, train rules,BC oil, fish stress, algae blooms, beaver fight, flood study

Goldfinch (Laurie MacBride)
Enjoying the Weedy Buffet
Laurie MacBride in Eye on Environment writes: "I owe some thanks to a goldfinch for saving me some work the other day. I was taking a brief rest in the garden, planning to return to my weeding in a few moments. But then this natty little fellow came hopping along and caused me to change my plan. One item that had been on my to-do list was to clear away the many straggly patches of forget-me-not that were going to seed throughout our flower and veggie beds. But the goldfinch obviously viewed my messy weeds as a tasty opportunity, tucking into the seeds with gusto…."

Environment lawyers challenge B.C.'s Kinder Morgan pipeline conditions
British Columbia’s five conditions for approval of the proposed $5.4 billion Kinder Morgan pipeline won’t be addressed if the province isn’t involved in the process, says a lawyer representing an environmental group. Ecojustice lawyer Karen Campbell said Thursday that the conditions set out by Premier Christy Clark are invisible during the ongoing National Energy Board process that is considering environmental approval of the pipeline. Ecojustice, on behalf of Living Oceans Society, filed a motion with the NEB requesting B.C. answer questions relating to the five conditions and the Kinder Morgan project. The province elected earlier not to file any evidence with the NEB. Dirk Meissner reports. (Canadian Press)

Sightline Sues Obama Administration over Crude Oil Exports and Illegal Secrecy
If the oil industry gets its way, the US will soon begin exporting tankers full of American crude to overseas markets. Although such shipments are for the most part illegal today, the Obama Administration is quietly changing the rules to favor oil exporters. To shed some light on the government’s behavior, the environmental law firm Earthjustice filed a formal Freedom of Information Act request in February on Sightline’s behalf, but it was greeted only by stony silence. So today, Sightline Institute, represented again by Earthjustice, is suing the federal government. We are asking the Courts to force the Obama Administration to do what it was legally required to by March 11: release information about its secretive deals with oil exporters to the public. Eric de Place writes. (Sightline)

Railroads use new oil shipment rule to fight transparency
Railroads may have found a new weapon in their fight to keep information about oil train shipments from the public: a federal rule that was supposed to increase transparency. The U.S. Department of Transportation insists that its May 1 final rule on oil trains, which mostly addresses an outdated tank car design, does not support the railroads’ position, nor was it intended to leave anyone in the dark. But in recent court filings in Maryland, two major oil haulers have cited the department’s new rule to justify their argument that no one except emergency responders should know what routes the trains use or how many travel through each state during a given week. Curtis Tate reports. (McClatchy)

Petroleum producers court B.C. with new sales pitch
In an era of collapsed oil prices and suspended projects in Alberta’s oilsands, the industry’s key lobby group argues new pipelines to the West Coast are needed more than ever. And in a renewed sales pitch to British Columbians, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers promises it will talk less and listen more, starting with opening an office in Vancouver, said the organization’s CEO Tim McMillan. Derrick Penner reports. (Vancouver Sun)

If you dare to watch: Face of bizarre sea creature Hallucigenia revealed
Scientists finally have a complete picture of what one of nature's most bizarre animals looked like. The tiny sea creature - Hallucigenia - lived 500 million years ago, but all fossils appeared to be without heads. New specimens unearthed in Canada have revealed the missing part, revealing its strange face for the first time. Rebecca Morelle reports. (BBC)

Ban anglers from drought-stressed streams, groups urge
The provincial government is failing to protect B.C.’s prized game fish in the face of a drought crisis that threatens the survival of the very trout, steelhead and salmon upon which a billion-dollar freshwater fishing sector depends. First Nations, professional guides, angling associations and naturalists are all pleading with an apparently deaf province to close drought-stricken Vancouver Island streams to sport fishing until they can be replenished by winter rains. Stephen Hume reports. (Vancouver Sun)

UW researcher helping pinpoint massive harmful algal bloom
The bloom that began earlier this year and shut down several shellfish fisheries along the West Coast has grown into the largest and most severe in at least a decade. UW research analyst Anthony Odell left June 15 from Newport, Oregon, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s research vessel Bell M. Shimada. He is part of a NOAA-led team of harmful algae experts who are surveying the extent of the patch and searching for “hot spots” — swirling eddies where previous research from the UW and NOAA shows the algae can grow and become toxic to marine animals and humans. Hannah Kickey and Michelle Ma reports. (UW Today) See also: Dungeness Crabbers Hit Hard By Algae Bloom On Washington Coast  Ashley Ahearn reports. (KUOW)

Researchers study plumes of algae in Sequim, Discovery bays; biotoxins stand below hazard levels
An algae strain capable of producing a potentially deadly biotoxin rarely found on the North Olympic Peninsula has been found in large quantities in both Sequim and Discovery bays. The marine algae has produced biotoxins in Sequim Bay, but not to the level that represents a public health risk, researchers said. Chris McDaniel reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Mom fights Shoreline School District about beaver and wins
The maintenance crew at Brookside Elementary in Lake Forest Park had a wildlife-removal firm set up traps to catch and kill a beaver at a creek by the school. Then they heard from moms and kids. The traps are gone. Erik Lacitis reports. (Seattle Times)

Skagit County officially puts end to Skagit River flood study
Skagit County will not invest any more money into the Skagit River General Investigation study. Skagit County officials say taxpayer money will be better spent on small-scale flood risk management projects, rather than on a study that has been 18 years and $14.4 million in the making and remains in the second of five phases. The county has paid half that cost, with the money coming from county, dike district, city and state Department of Ecology sources. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
 WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 900 PM PDT THU JUN 25 2015
FRI
NW WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
FRI NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...EASING TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT...SUBSIDING TO 1 FT OR LESS AFTER MIDNIGHT. W SWELL 5 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
SAT
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 5 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT IN THE EVENING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
SUN
SE WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING W IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 8 SECONDS.

--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Thursday, June 25, 2015

6/25 Grey whale, shoreline protection, hot weather, Invasive species

Grey whale display (PHOTO: MarilynAssaf/CBC)
If you like to watch: Grey whale that washed ashore 5 years ago on display on Vancouver Island
The bones of a 10-metre grey whale that was found on a beach on Vancouver Island five years ago is now on display for the public. The journey began back in April 2010 when the whale washed ashore at East Sooke Park, just outside of Victoria. (CBC)

Conservation groups seek increased shoreline protections in Puget Sound
Three conservation groups on Wednesday petitioned the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to change how it regulates seawalls, bulkheads or other barriers to increase habitat protections along Puget Sound shorelines. Such concrete or rock structures prevent erosion and protect waterfront homes, but they also alter beaches and disrupt habitat for juvenile salmon, forage fish and other species. So Friends of San Juans, the Washington Environmental Council and Sound Action are asking the Corps’ Seattle District to use its authority to regulate so-called “shoreline armoring” projects in tidal areas. Phuong Le reports. (Associated Press)

June plans a final weekend roast
The Puget Sound area is sizzling its way toward its warmest June on record, with weekend temperatures forecast to reach the low 90s. Jack Broom reports. (Seattle Times) See also: Hot weekend expected in Victoria; fire danger high The wildfire danger has hit the “extreme” rating in parts of Greater Victoria, including Saanich, and is high on most of Vancouver Island amid dry, hot weather that’s expected to reach the high 20s by the weekend…. Environment Canada predicts Saturday will be the hottest day. It will be even hotter in Port Alberni, Nanaimo and Campbell River. Katie DeRosa reports. (Times Colonist)

Invasive species a threat in every corner of B.C.
Dozens of non-native invasive plants and animals are established in British Columbia, arriving on the wind, in nursery plants, soil and on improperly cleaned boats. Invasives are more than a nuisance, costing millions in crop losses, ruined infrastructure and threatening natural biodiversity, according to the Invasive Species Council of B.C. The federal government this week passed new regulations in the Aquatic Invasive Species Act granting new powers to border staff and creating a guideline for responding to infestations. Randy Shore reports. (Vancouver Sun) See also: Albertans warned not to flush 'invasive' goldfish  (BBC)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 900 PM PDT WED JUN 24 2015
THU
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING NW 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 4 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
THU NIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 3 FT AT 13 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter.

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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

6/24 Northern lights, BC LNG, Shell drill, garburators, Vic sewer

(PHOTO: Jay Cline/Peninsula Daily News)
If you like to watch: Northern lights dazzle in Vancouver after unusual solar flares
Vancouverites caught a rare glimpse of the northern lights on Monday night, due to an unusually strong solar storm on the surface of the sun. The northern lights, also known as aurora borealis, are created by solar flares on the sun's surface that create gusts of solar winds that pass through the Earth's atmosphere causing particles to emit the brilliant colours. (CBC) See also: Aurora borealis lights leap up in North Olympic Peninsula skies

B.C. government plans rare summer legislature session for LNG deal
The B.C. government plans to have a rare summer sitting of the legislature to pass law changes that would clear the way for a controversial LNG facility near Prince Rupert. Finance Minister Mike de Jong announced Tuesday the legislature will be recalled on July 13, to debate legislation that would enable the project agreement signed between B.C. and Pacific NorthWest LNG, which is owned in majority by Malaysia's Petronas. Last month, Premier Christy Clark announced the agreement in principle with the energy giant to build a terminal on Lelu Island, south of Prince Rupert, which Clark said would mean $36 billion investment for the province. (CBC) See also: Petronas agrees to conduct more studies on B.C. terminal’s impact  (Globe and Mail)

Groups say Shell’s drilling plans don’t protect marine mammals
Environmental groups say that Shell’s plans for oil exploration this summer in the Chukchi Sea don’t comply with federal rules that seek to protect marine mammals. In a Tuesday letter to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, environmental groups said this represented a “fundamental flaw,” and that Shell should not be allowed to proceed with the summer drilling. The Interior Department’s 2013 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regulations prohibit the drilling of wells within 15 miles of each other to minimize the cumulative effects of oil exploration on the walrus. The two wells that Shell wants to drill this summer are about 9 miles apart. (Seattle Times)

Metro Vancouver fears rising use of garburators will strain sewage plants
As Metro Vancouver prepares to impose fines to stop the dumping of organic food waste in the garbage, officials at the regional district now worry too many residents and businesses will instead use garburators to send the problem down the drain. As a result, Metro planners are now considering a ban on the installation of new food waste grinders by restaurants and other businesses, and they're mulling how to keep households from using garburators that are already widespread in newer homes. Using in-sink disposals to grind up food and flush it down the drain is convenient for people and businesses who don't have organic waste pickup service or don't want to use it. Jeff Nagel reports. (Peace Arch News)

Saanich rules out potential sewage-treatment site on ALR land
A 12-hectare property on Watkiss Way adjacent to Victoria General Hospital won’t be sent to the Capital Regional District for consideration as a sewage-treatment site, despite the urging of proponents who say it has strong potential. The privately owned forested rural property, part of the Agricultural Land Reserve, had to be vetted by Saanich council to be placed on the CRD’s list of possible sites, said Ray Parks, representing owner Allen Vandekerhove. Council voted 5-4 Monday night not to send the proposal to the CRD. Jeff Bell reports. (Times Colonist)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 830 PM PDT TUE JUN 23 2015
WED
LIGHT WIND BECOMING NW 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 16 SECONDS. CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
WED NIGHT
NW WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 3 FT BUILDING TO 5 FT AT 11 SECONDS. CHANCE OF SHOWERS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter.

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Tuesday, June 23, 2015

6/23 Stink bug, coal port, orcas, Squalicum Cr., ocean watch, sewer pot, saving salmon


Stink bug  (Steve Ringman/The Seattle Times)
Farmers worry about harvest as stink bugs make a mess in NW region
On a hot June day, Joe Beaudoin ducked into the shade of his orchard to check for peaches with shallow dimples — the telltale signs left by the brown marmorated stink bug. This invader from Asia has a formidable appetite for the berries, tree fruits and vegetables that Beaudoin grows on his 80-acre farm. This spring, even before the trees sprouted all their leaves, the bug already had begun to pierce the tiny peaches to suck out juice. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times)

Panel: Coal port would lift Whatcom economy
People at an invitation-only meeting hosted by pro-business groups on Monday, June 22, heard a message most of them agreed with. If the growth of Whatcom County’s post-recession economy is going to catch up to the rest of the state, it would help if a proposed 54 million-metric-ton export terminal for coal and other bulk goods was built at Cherry Point. That was the message during a panel discussion at the meeting held in Fox Hall at Hampton Inn…. U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Everett, one of the speakers at the luncheon, reiterated his support for Gateway Pacific Terminal, saying it was one solution to Whatcom’s weak employment numbers. Ralph Schwartz reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Burrard Inlet visited by killer whales, just in time for Aquarium app announcement
A pod of killer whales has been spotted in Burrard Inlet. The group of at least four orcas was first reported off the Stanley Park Seawall Monday morning, and has since been seen crossing back under the Lions Gate Bridge and out of the inlet. The black and white visitors came just as the Vancouver Aquarium announced a new smartphone app meant to help marine mammal scientists learn more about whales, dolphins and sea turtles on the B.C. coast. The B.C. Cetacean Sightings Network, an aquarium conservation program, launched its new WhaleReport app on Monday, allowing boaters and ecotourists to report sightings with the touch of a button. Users can view a species identification guide and then upload photos of the animal and automatically enter accurate GPS. Bethany Lindsay reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Project to move Squalicum Creek will help water quality
A $1.8 million project will re-route Squalicum Creek around Sunset Pond to improve water quality and otherwise make the creek more habitable for salmon and other wildlife. The project is expected to start July 6. It will put the creek into 5,100 feet of new stream channel to bypass Sunset Pond. Squalicum Creek doesn’t meet state standards for water quality and is listed as impaired by the Washington state Department of Ecology. Problems include fecal coliform bacteria, too-warm temperatures and dissolved oxygen levels that are inadequate. Declining salmon stocks also are a concern. Kie Relyea reports. (Bellingham Herald)

B.C. ocean observation project useful for oil industry: report
A subsea observation system being built by Ocean Networks Canada at the University of Victoria lets Girl Guides explore the ocean floor and will let scientists detect underground earthquakes or predict tsunamis. The federal government has sunk more than $30-million into the project, and not just for pure science: An internal government document shows Ottawa is interested primarily because it can help “responsible resource development.” In particular, it says, information from the Smart Oceans project could support the development of pipelines linking the Alberta oil sands to the Pacific coast. Dene Moore reports. (Globe and Mail)

Feds Paying for Sewer Analysis of Pot Usage in Washington
The federal government is chipping in money for a three-year pilot study using sewage samples to determine levels of marijuana use in two Washington cities — research that could help answer some key questions about pot legalization, the University of Puget Sound announced Monday. The National Institutes of Health has agreed to pay $120,000 so Dan Burgard, an associate chemistry professor, can conduct a three-year study that will look at how per-capita pot use changed after Washington's first legal pot shops opened last July. The research, based on methods first developed by scientists in Italy in 2005, involves analyzing wastewater samples for levels of metabolites produced when the body processes drugs. Gene Johnson reports. (Associated Press)

How to save wild salmon with a fork and knife
If we demand wild salmon on our plates, we are demanding healthy habitat where wild salmon can thrive in perpetuity. Mark Titus and Tom Douglas opine. (Seattle Times)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 900 PM PDT MON JUN 22 2015
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 15 SECONDS.
TUE
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 14 SECONDS.
TUE NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 15 SECONDS.

--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. http://twitter.com/#!/savepugetsound/

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Monday, June 22, 2015

6/22 Spotted owl, Dungeness crab, Brian Cladoosby, Sally Lider, BC pipe, toxic algae, pumpout

Lapland longspur (BirdNote)
If you like to listen-- The Longest Day of the Year
On the summer solstice, birds nesting near Juneau, Alaska take advantage of almost 18 1/2 hours between sunrise and sunset. This day in south Texas is considerably shorter, so the Altamira Oriole has only 14 hours to sing. Seattle's Song Sparrows see 16 hours of daylight; Sacramento's only 15. Birds nesting north of the Arctic Circle have six weeks with almost 24 hours of daylight every day. So this Lapland Longspur has a work-day that's about as long as it gets.  (BirdNote)

25th anniversary of spotted owl listing: fewer owls, less timber industry
The heated debate over whether to curtail the logging of old-growth forests to protect the northern spotted owl was at full throttle when the federal government declared the bird a threatened species June 22, 1990. At the time, environmentalists worried that the federal plan would fall short of saving the spotted owl.  Timber interests worried that a wave of environmental rules would gut the Olympic Peninsula’s wood-products industry and devastate communities. Twenty-five years later, the effects of the landmark decision can be seen in the reams of economic, industry and environmental data routinely gathered by state and federal governments. The outcomes are by turns expected, disheartening and surprising. George Erb reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Record year possible for Dungeness crab enthusiasts
Signs indicate numbers up to 3 million pounds of crab could exceed last year’s record harvest. Mark Yuasa reports. (Seattle Times)

Swinomish leader Brian Cladoosby fights for salmon and sovereignty
From his days as a scrappy ballplayer for La Conner High, the Swinomish chairman has achieved national prominence as casinos fuel tribal wealth and influence Brian J. Cantwell reports. (Seattle Times)

Sally Lider, face of city’s environmental education programs, retiring July 2
After 24 years, the face of environmental education in the City of Edmonds – and the founder of annual city-sponsored Bird Fest — is retiring. Sally Lider was first hired by the city in 1991 as a part-time beach ranger, a job that fit her background and interests. (My Edmonds News)

District votes against pipeline plan
Add the District of North Vancouver to the list of communities that have formally opposed Kinder Morgan's application to twin the Trans Mountain pipeline to Burrard Inlet. District council passed a motion similar to ones passed by the councils in Burnaby and Vancouver, following a lengthy presentation from staff Monday night on the environmental, health and economic concerns raised by increased tanker traffic or a potential spill at Westridge Terminal. Brent Richter reports. (North Shore News)

Toxic algae bloom west of Island threatens salmon
A toxic algae bloom west of Vancouver Island has prompted shellfish harvest bans and may affect salmon stocks, federal scientists say.The bloom stretches along the Pacific coast from California to B.C., making it possibly the largest one on record in the area, scientists have said. Amy Smart reports. (Times Colonist)

Vancouver offers free sewage pump-out at civic marinas
In an effort to reduce high E. coli bacteria levels in English Bay the Vancouver park board is opening up the sewage pump-out stations at its two False Creek civic marinas to all boaters The pump-out stations at Burrard Civic and Heather Street marinas were free for marina members, but other boaters were charged a $10 fee to pump out their on-board sewage holding tanks. But on Friday at the launch of the board’s Clean Water Campaign, park board vice-chair Sarah Kirby-Yung announced that free pump out will be available to all pleasure boat users. Gerry Bellett reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 830 PM PDT SUN JUN 21 2015
MON
SW WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 2 FT AT 18 SECONDS.
MON NIGHT AND TUE
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 3 FT AT 15 SECONDS.

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