Friday, July 30, 2021

7/30 Saw-whet owl, Lummi totem pole, Cherry Pt, Hood Canal steelhead, AK sockeye, plastic reycling, minke whales, BC mining, week in review

 
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In August, the automated email service provided by FollowByEmail (Feedburner) from this website will be discontinued. You will still be able to read the weekday postings by going to http://salishseanews.blogspot.com/ but if you wish to continue receiving the posting by email, please send your name and email address to mikesato772@gmail.com



Northern Saw-whet Owl
[Gregg Thompson/BirdWeb]


Northern Saw-whet Owl Aegolius acadicus
Named for the resemblance of one of their calls to the sound of saw teeth being sharpened, Northern Saw-whet Owls are small, chestnut-brown owls with prominent white markings on the folded wings and brown-and-white striped chests and bellies. They have no ear-tufts. Their eyes are yellow, and their white eyebrows connect in a 'Y' over their beaks. Throats are white. Fledglings are solid brown above with light buffy bellies and a well-defined white triangle on their foreheads. (BirdWeb)

Lummi Nation totem pole arrives in D.C. after journey to sacred lands across U.S.
A 25-foot totem pole, intricately hand-carved and painted by Native Americans, arrived in the nation’s capital Wednesday afternoon after a two-week cross-country journey from Washington state, as part of a campaign to protect sacred tribal lands. Dana Hedgpeth reports. (Washington Post)

Years in the making, amendments ban new fossil-fuel industries, new shipping terminals at Cherry Point
No new oil, natural gas or coal-based industries will be allowed at Cherry Point west of Ferndale under Whatcom County’s latest — and groundbreaking — Comprehensive Plan amendments, following a unanimous vote by the county council. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Salish Current)

if you like to watch: Hood Canal native steelhead
Live feed from a steelhead rearing pond at a conservation hatchery on Hood Canal. These steelhead (or rainbow trout, the freshwater variant of the same species) are part of an innovative conservation program that Long Live the Kings manages to support the recovery of Hood Canal’s native steelhead. Hatched from wild-spawned eggs, they are being raised here to help give natural populations a boost. When they are mature, they are released to spawn in the rivers and migrate to sea.

As sockeye runs struggle elsewhere in North America, a record run in Alaska’s Bristol Bay
Amid a fierce June storm that whipped up 8-foot waves, Robin Samuelsen told his four young crew members to let out the gillnets behind his 32-foot boat in the Nushagak district of Bristol Bay...In the weeks that followed, storms often returned to make fishing miserable, and at times dangerous. Through it all, the salmon kept surging back from their ocean feeding grounds in what — by this week — developed into a record return of more than 65.5 million sockeye to the Bristol Bay region. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times)

Steveston recycling plant aims to transform plastic ocean debris into useful products 
A new plastic-processing plant that opened Wednesday in Steveston aims to turn plastic found in B.C.'s oceans into useful products...The new specialized recycling facility, operated by the Ocean Legacy Foundation, transforms the material into pellets that can be used to create new plastic products.  Brittany Roffel reports. (CBC)

Solitary minke whales lurk in the waters of Puget Sound
A resident population of minke whales is catching the attention of scientists who want to learn if the elusive mammals are found here year-round. While small compared to their cousin the blue whale, minkes are still among the largest creatures in the Salish Sea. Eric Wagner reports. (Salish Sea Currents Magazine)

How a fight against a Vancouver Island rock quarry became a battle to modernize B.C.’s mining laws
Residents of the Highlands, just outside Victoria, were told that according to the Mines Act the climate impacts of a hotly contested aggregate mine were irrelevant to the project’s approval — catalyzing a campaign for new mining rules that is now being brought to Canada’s Supreme Court. Braela Kwan reports. (The Narwhal)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 7/30/21: Friendship Friday, BC rainforest, Biden's enviro justice, Big Bar, heat-stressed salmon, PCB suit, J-Pod, Cherry Pt, Lummi totem pole


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  255 AM PDT Fri Jul 30 2021   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. SW swell 1 ft at 9 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 1 ft at 9 seconds building to 3 ft  at 10 seconds after midnight. 
SAT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt rising to 15 to 25 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less building to 2 to 4 ft in the afternoon. W  swell 3 ft at 10 seconds becoming SW 2 ft at 12 seconds in the  afternoon. 
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 15 to 25 kt easing to 5 to 15 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft subsiding to 2 ft or less after  midnight. W swell 2 ft at 11 seconds. 
SUN
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 2 ft at 9 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Thursday, July 29, 2021

7/29 Pygmy owl, J-pod, AK quake, PCB suit, heated salmon, island water, wildfire smoke, BC logging, Fairy Cr protest

*IMPORTANT NOTICE*
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Northern Pygmy-Owl [Gregg Thompson/BirdWeb]


Northern Pygmy-Owl Glaucidium gnoma
The Northern Pygmy-Owl is a small, long-tailed owl, with yellow eyes and feet. It has only small and inconspicuous ear-tufts, which are seldom seen in the field. Its plumage is reddish-brown spotted with white. Like all members of its genus, it has false eye-spots, black outlined in white, on the back of its neck. Its belly is white, with dark streaks. It usually perches in a diagonal rather than upright position. (BirdWeb) Tony Angell suggests that "the Northern pygmy...is not a reddish-brown (the ferruginous pygmy owl is but is from the western border states and into Mexico), but rather a coffee or dark brown with cream and beige colored spotting."

J-Pod returns to Salish Sea after 'unprecedented' 108-day absence
 J-Pod is back in town. The group of endangered southern resident killer whales was spotted Tuesday near Sooke travelling eastbound on inland waters toward Victoria, according to Dustin De Gagne, supervisor of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Whale Protection Unit.  No official count was available, but it’s believed all 24 members of the pod are together, J-Pod hasn’t been seen in the Salish Sea since April 10, an “unprecedented” stretch of 108 days. Darren Kloster reports. (Times Colonist)

No tsunami threat to B.C. after powerful earthquake shakes Alaska
A powerful earthquake that struck just off Alaska's southern coast caused prolonged shaking and prompted tsunami warnings that sent people scrambling for shelters. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) said the quake measured magnitude 8.2 and hit 91 kilometres east southeast of Perryville, Alaska, at about 8:15 p.m. PT Wednesday. It struck about 46 kilometres below the surface of the ocean, according to USGS. (Associated Press)

Monsanto Hit With $185M Verdict Over Teachers’ PCB-Related Brain Damage
A Washington state court jury sacked Bayer AG’s Monsanto unit with a $185 million verdict on Tuesday in a lawsuit filed by teachers exposed to toxic chemicals in a dilapidated school, including an award of punitive damages resulting from the application of Missouri law. Tuesday’s verdict ends a long-running trial that began in early June over claims by three teachers who allege they suffered neurological injuries due to exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs...PCB’s are long-lasting chemicals used in a variety of industrial products, and the teachers claim their exposure occurred via PCBs in fluorescent lighting from the 1960’s and building caulk in the Sky Valley Education Center in Monroe, Washington. David Seigel reports. (Courtroom View Network)

Underwater video shows heat-stressed salmon, but it could have been worse
June’s heat wave led to some unhealthy hot water for salmon. But, fish managers said it hasn’t been as devastating for salmon runs as the warm water temperatures were in 2015. Underwater video from a Columbia River tributary in south-central Washington shows sockeye salmon infected with fungus caused by heat stress. They’re hiding out in the cooler waters of the Little White Salmon River, far from their spawning grounds. Courtney Flatt reports. (OPB)

Have enough water? San Juan prepares to find out, with USGS study
Lopez Island aquifers logged some of the highest recharge rates in the county when water supply was last studied. A new study next year will provide important data for managing supply as well as planning for the future as the population continues to grow. Heather Spaulding reports. (Salish Current) Water supply on Guemes: an island paradise faces challenges  More people and rising sea levels mean continuously increasing freshwater challenges on Guemes Island, compelling action on the part of individuals — and possibly government — to ensure enough water supply to meet demand. Elisa Claassen reports. (Salish Current) Is there enough water to go around an island? Welcome to Water Watchers, a deep dive into the precious resource of fresh water on Lummi Island. This is a series of articles and resources to help us all appreciate and manage our access to safe drinking water. (Welcome to Lummi Island)

Wildfire Smoke in the San Juans
Apart from a major earthquake on the Cascadia Fault, wildfire is arguably the greatest threat to property and lives in the San Juan Islands.  Fortunately, fires of serious magnitude have been limited in our islands, and with an increasing focus on wise fire-prevention practices there is reason to hope this will continue to be the case.  But wildfires elsewhere in the United States, particularly in the Pacific Northwest, have increased substantially in recent decades. This increase has been most dramatic in the last five years, creating trends of larger areas burned, greater fire-season length and higher sustained wildfire-related smoke and air-pollutant impacts. Dr. Arthur Winer writes. (Orcas Currents)

Increased logging endangers southeastern B.C.'s rainforests, study says
Increased logging activities have endangered B.C. 's Interior rainforests and, if left unchecked, may lead to their ecological collapse in a decade, warns a new international study. In an article published last week in the journal Land, conservation scientists from Prince George, B.C., as well as Oregon and Australia say industrial logging has eliminated 2.7 million hectares of forest in the province's Interior wet belt bio-region over the past 50 years — including more than 500,000 hectares of the inland temperate rainforest, the wettest portion of the region. Winston Szeto reports. (CBC)

Fairy Creek protesters defend felling small trees in order to impede police
A protest group is defending the actions of its members who cut down some small trees to impede police enforcing a court injunction against blockades that have been set up to prevent old-growth logging on southern Vancouver Island. The group, dubbed the Rainforest Flying Squad, responded in a statement on Monday, saying its members cut the small, second-growth trees in order to slow police progress in reaching other protesters who were chained to structures. They say Pacheedaht First Nation elder Bill Jones, who supports the protest group, does not disapprove of their felling of small trees to protect old growth. A statement from Jones released by the group says it's common practice in logging to cut down young trees growing at the side of roadways and that's not a threat to ecology. (Canadian Press)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  254 AM PDT Thu Jul 29 2021   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. SW swell 1 ft at 13 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. S swell 1 ft  at 13 seconds building to 3 ft at 12 seconds after midnight.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Wednesday, July 28, 2021

7/28 Snowy owl, Big Bar, Skagit dams, OR clean energy, kelp forests, heat produce, invasive species, border guard strike

 
*IMPORTANT NOTICE*
In August, the automated email service provided by FollowByEmail (Feedburner) from this website will be discontinued. You will still be able to read the weekday postings by going to http://salishseanews.blogspot.com/ but if you wish to continue receiving the posting by email, please send your name and email address to mikesato772@gmail.com



Snowy Owl [Joseph V. Higbee/BirdWeb]


Snowy Owl  Bubo scandiacus
Snowy Owls are large owls with yellow eyes and no ear-tufts. Adult males can be nearly pure white, but most have some brown mottling in their feathers. Adult females are generally larger and darker than males; immatures have considerably more brown mottling. In all plumages, Snowy Owls have solid white faces. Like most owls, Snowy Owls have feathered legs and feet, but the feathers on the Snowy Owl's legs and feet are especially dense. Snowy Owls are well camouflaged for their Arctic breeding grounds, but in winter, when they are seen in Washington, their mostly white bodies show up well against most backgrounds. (BirdWeb) Tony Angell adds that "the Snowy Owl is heavily feathered to the tips of its talons, like the great grey owl, [which provides] important insulation against the cold of its Arctic winter habitat."

Wildfires, floods and rock slides force pause on permanent fishway project at Big Bar landslide site
Efforts to create a permanent safe passage for fish at the Big Bar landslide site are being delayed as a number of incidents have made work challenging and in some cases, dangerous for crews. Originally, the federal government estimated a $176 million permanent fishway would be completed by May 2022, but now, officials say that timeline is "no longer possible" and further costs are unknown. Courtney Dickson reports. (CBC)

Seattle’s River of the Damned
How dams on the Skagit River impact the survival of salmon and the whales that eat them. Lester Black writes. (High Country News/Hakai Magazine)

Oregon governor signs ambitious clean energy bill
Oregon’s clean energy bill, which sets one of the most ambitious timelines in the country for moving to 100% clean electricity sources, was signed by Gov. Kate Brown on Tuesday. The legislation lays out a timetable for the state’s two major power companies — Portland General Electric and Pacific Power — to reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with electricity sold to Oregon consumers. Additionally, it bans the expansion or new construction of power plants that burn fossil fuels and allocates $50 million in grants for community-based energy projects, among other measures. Sara Kline report. (Associated Press)

Exploring Puget Sound's Kelp Forests
Take a trip to explore the forests down below the Salish Sea. (Puget Sound Restoration Fund)

Fresh produce, shellfish prices will rise as NW farmers hope for drought, heat wave help
The Pacific Northwest’s farmers have been hit with a brutal one-two punch this summer — in late June, a record-breaking heat wave torched the region, followed by a statewide drought emergency. Berry farmers were particularly devastated by the heat wave, but the event left its fingerprints on the dairy, hops, shellfish, tree fruits, grain, wine grapes, poultry, beef and potato industries as well. Ysabelle Kempe reports. (Bellingham Herald) No crabs, no scallops: Seafood is vanishing from menus in U.S. For restaurants across the U.S., the reopening from COVID lockdown has been anything but easy. Kate Krader and Adam Jackson report. (Bloomberg)

Most Invasive Marine Species Swim Under the Radar
Half of all invasive species in the ocean have only been studied once, and we only know about the potential impacts of one out of every 10. María Paula Rubiano A. reports. (Hakai Magazine)

Canadian border guards vote to strike days ahead of reopening to U.S. tourists
Canadian border guards and customs officials voted on Tuesday to go on strike just days before fully vaccinated U.S. citizens and permanent residents will be allowed into Canada, unions representing the workers said, a move that could potentially cause disruptions and hurt businesses emerging out of the pandemic-driven economic downturn. A strike would slow down commercial traffic at the land border, the unions said, as well as impact international mail and collection of duties and taxes. But a spokesperson for the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) said 90% of the front-line border services officers have been identified as “essential” so will continue to work in the event of a strike. Moira Warburton reports. (Reuters)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  259 AM PDT Wed Jul 28 2021   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW in the afternoon. Wind waves  2 ft or less. SW swell 2 ft at 9 seconds. Patchy fog in the  morning. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. SW swell 2 ft at 10 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Tuesday, July 27, 2021

7/27 Great horned owl, Cherry Pt, world warming, Dickerson Cr, fish guts, refinery fine, BC ferries, bad fisherman

*IMPORTANT NOTICE*
In August, the automated email service provided by FollowByEmail (Feedburner) from this website will be discontinued. You will still be able to read the weekday postings by going to http://salishseanews.blogspot.com/ but if you wish to continue receiving the posting by email, please send your name and email address to mikesato772@gmail.com

Great Horned Owl [Lee Barnes/BirdWeb]

Great Horned Owl Bubo virginianus
Great Horned Owls are large, powerful owls with prominent ear-tufts, prominent facial disks, and bold yellow eyes. Their plumage is a mix of mottled brown with white-and-black barring, with some white at the throat. There is much variation in the darkness and shade of these colors across their range.(BirdWeb)

Whatcom council to vote on permanent ban of new fossil fuel industries at Cherry Point
It could become a model for refinery communities around the country when it votes on Tuesday night. That’s what some advocates are saying about Whatcom County as its council gets ready to decide the fate of industrial land at Cherry Point, north of Bellingham. Bellamy Paithorp reports. (KNKX)

The Heat, Floods and Fire We Don’t Hear Enough About
From India to Turkey, it’s not just “crazy weather.” It’s the world at 1.2 degrees of global warming, explain climate scientists. Laura Millan Lombrana reports. (Bloomberg)

A new stream bed is being built on Dickerson Creek. Here's how it will help salmon.
From his log cabin off Northlake Way, Bernie Fleming has a front-row seat for the rebirth of a salmon stream.  Earthmovers on Fleming's property are building a new, meandering route for Dickerson Creek, a waterway important to fish migration but plugged up by concrete and other debris for decades. Fleming and his wife, Elaine, have watched as fish runs have nearly ground to a halt in recent years. Josh Farley reports. (Kitsap Sun)

Anglers and researchers delve into fish guts to save salmon
Micah Quindazzi has spent a good chunk of his science career elbows deep in pungent fish guts. Squeezing out stomachs and poking through intestines seems like distasteful and ignoble work, but it’s part of a wider collaborative effort by researchers and recreational fishermen to save endangered salmon and divine changes to the marine food web as climate change advances. Rochelle Baker reports. (National Observer)

A refinery spewed black smoke into this NW community. Now this oil giant will pay
The Northwest Clean Air Agency slapped Shell with a $60,000 penalty Monday, July 26, after its Puget Sound Refinery in Anacortes spewed odorous black smoke into the air in August and September. Ysabella Kempe reports. (Bellingham Herald)

B.C. Ferries hopes for whale-free weekend to handle expected crush of traffic
B.C. Ferries is hoping for a little cooperation from the Salish Sea’s whale population as it prepares for the busiest weekend of the season. With reservations already booking up for the August long weekend, B.C. Ferries is hoping to avoid any repeat of the sailing cancellation it had to make due to orcas frolicking in Fulford Harbour on the weekend. Andrew Duffey reports. (Times Colonist)

Province wants cash, house from banned commercial fisherman for alleged illegal fishing
The B.C. government is asking to seize a Gabriola Island home and more than $1.3 million in cash from a commercial fisherman who is banned from fishing until 2038. In a petition filed on June 28 in B.C. Supreme Court, the B.C. Civil Forfeiture Office says the cash and the home are proceeds of illegal fishing and money laundering. Gordon Hoekstra reports. (Vancouver Sun)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  235 AM PDT Tue Jul 27 2021   
TODAY
 SW wind to 10 kt becoming NW in the afternoon. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 2 ft at 9 seconds. Areas of fog in  the morning. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell  2 ft at 10 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Monday, July 26, 2021

7/26 Barred owl, Biden's enviro justice, BC rainforest, BC drought, ecocide, WA bag ban, BC ferries fee, Fairy Cr protest, Japanese beetle, Green Team

 

*IMPORTANT NOTICE*
In August, the automated email service provided by FollowByEmail (Feedburner) from this website will be discontinued. You will still be able to read the weekday postings by going to http://salishseanews.blogspot.com/ but if you wish to continue receiving the posting by email, please send your name and email address to mikesato772@gmail.com [


Barred Owls [Gene Helfman]

Barred Owl
Reader Gene Helfman last week wrote: "Since we don't have to worry about Barred Owls displacing Spotted Owls around here, we're happy to announce that our local BO couple has fledged three owlets. They're hanging around in our woods. "Captured" two of them the other evening."

White House lays out environmental justice guidance 
Two big themes of the first six months of the Joe Biden administration have been racial equity — the focus of one of the first executive orders the president signed — and environmental infrastructure, a big part of the infrastructure bill working its way through Congress. On Wednesday, those themes came together. The White House released 13 pages of instructions to federal agencies on how to make sure that disadvantaged communities get at least 40% of the benefits from spending on energy and the environment. Andy Uhler reports. (Marketplace)

B.C.’s rare inland rainforest at risk of collapse, international scientists warn in new study
The province’s unique inland temperate rainforest is home to endangered species and cedar trees more than 1,000 years old — but its old-growth ecosystems could be destroyed in less than a decade if logging continues at its current pace. Sarah Cox reports. (The Narwhal)

People asked to cut water use as drought dries up southern B.C. rivers
People in southern B.C. are being asked to limit their water consumption as drought conditions threaten aquatic wildlife and agriculture. Sarah Grochowski reports. (Vancouver Sun)

International lawyers define the crime ecocide
Canadian International human rights lawyer Lisa Oldring, who has spent most of her career working for the United Nations but now works independently on cases of climate justice, advises Stop Ecocide Canada, which is advocating to have the term recognized in international law. 'It is the most serious category of environmental crimes. We are not talking about 'did you recycle?' or how much red meat you eat,' says Oldring. Tiffany Crawford reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Small business owners question viability of Washington's plastic bag ban
A new law banning single-use plastic bags in Washington starting this fall has some business owners concerned about costs after a year of economic hardships. Lionel Donovan reports. (KING)

BC Ferries Ups the Pressure to Pay $17 Reservation Fee
With more space allocated for drivers who reserve, travellers face more waits unless they pay up. Andrew MacLeod reports. (The Tyee)

RCMP accuse protesters of cutting 18 healthy trees to block road access
The RCMP is accusing Fairy Creek anti-logging protesters of cutting down 18 healthy trees and placing them across the road to block access for forestry company Teal-Jones. Louise Dickson    reports. (Times Colonist)

Efforts to knock down invasive Japanese beetle in Vancouver appear to be working
Eradication efforts to keep a voracious plant-eating invasive insect from establishing itself in British Columbia appear to be working. Japanese beetles were discovered in downtown Vancouver in 2017 and immediately recognized as an invasive species that, if allowed to proliferate in the province, could devastate plants and commercial crops. Chad Pawson reports. (CBC)

This new Whatcom initiative hopes to give students help to take action on climate change
The Green Team Network is a long time coming, said Priscilla Brotherton..., the Sustainable Schools program manager at environmental nonprofit RE Sources... The Green Team Network is a grant-funded initiative the organization is launching at the beginning of this upcoming school year. The program seeks to support Whatcom County’s elementary and middle schools in forming green teams, or groups of students advocating to make their schools and communities more sustainable Ysabelle Kempe reports. (Bellingham Herald)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  257 AM PDT Mon Jul 26 2021   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 10 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the  afternoon. W swell 2 ft at 12 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. SW swell 1 ft at 12 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 23, 2021

7/23 Sweet William, more lace, Skagit dams, levee setback, coast salmon fishery, noise pollution, deer deaths, border carbon tax, Dabob Bay reserve, Schoolhouse Cr, Protection Is birdman

*IMPORTANT NOTICE*
In August, the automated email service provided by FollowByEmail (Feedburner) from this website will be discontinued. You will still be able to read the weekday postings by going to http://salishseanews.blogspot.com/ but if you wish to continue receiving the posting by email, please send your name and email address to mikesato772@gmail.com


Sweet William [Gardenia]


Sweet William Dianthus barbatus
The sweet William is a species of flowering plant in the family Caryophyllaceae, native to southern Europe and parts of Asia. It has become a popular ornamental garden plant. The exact origin of its English common name is unknown but first appears in 1596 in botanist John Gerard's garden catalogue. The flowers are edible and may have medicinal properties. Sweet William attracts bees, birds, and butterflies. (Wikipedia)

Queen Anne's Lace
Yesterday's note about Queen Anne's Lace brought forth several amplifications, one of which noted: "Queen Anne’s-lace is a Class C weed in Washington State. Its presence in an area makes it impossible to grow reliably pure carrot seed, which was formerly an industry in western Washington and is now confined to the Columbia Basin. Typically, when crossed, the resulting carrot seed produces whitish roots with strong taste  rather than orange/sweet cultivated carrot taste. 'Class C Weeds:Noxious weeds that are typically widespread in WA or are of special interest to the state’s agricultural industry. The Class C status allows county weed boards to require control if locally desired, or theymay choose to provide education or technical consultation.' For example, in Jefferson County, Queen Anne’s-lace became widespread after one single gardener on Marrowstone Island started growing it around 1981. It was spread by mowers along highway corridors and its proximity to cultivated carrots put an end to carrot seed production within two years." The similar but smaller poison hemlock is a Class B weed in the state.

Feds approve 32 studies in dam relicensing process
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which oversees the licensing of hydroelectric dams, issued last week a study plan determination for the relicensing of Seattle City Light’s three-dam Skagit River Hydroelectric Project. Of 33 studies proposed by Seattle City Light and eight studies proposed by stakeholders, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is requiring 32 from Seattle City Light’s list. The agency approved 20 study plans as written, and is requiring modifications on 12. The studies FERC rejected include Seattle City Light’s plan to analyze the genetics of fish in the reservoirs behind the dams, and proposals from stakeholders to expand fish, habitat and mitigation land studies — as well as the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe’s request to consider the removal of Gorge Dam. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Levee setback aims to provide flood protection, protect salmon
A 1960s-era levee on the Dungeness River is in the process of being replaced.Representatives with the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe is constructing a 5,000-foot long Rivers Edge setback levee on the tribe’s property west of Towne Road to increase flooding protection for landowners and nearby properties and to restore salmon habitat.  Michael Dashiell reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Canada’s sweeping closures of Pacific coast salmon fisheries leave workers reeling
Commercial fishers are paying the price for 'collective failure' to minimize impacts to wild salmon populations, says watchdog. Matt Simmons reports. (The Narwhal)

Noise Pollution Affects Practically Everything, Even Seagrass
Seagrass may not have ears, but that doesn’t stop noise pollution from causing serious damage to the plant’s other structures. Ashley Braun reports. (Hakai Magazine)

State investigating deaths of deer in Anacortes
A disease the state Department of Fish and Wildlife determined in early June was killing deer on the San Juan Islands is now believed to be affecting deer in Anacortes. Robert Waddell, district wildlife biologist for Skagit and Whatcom counties, said as of Tuesday six dead deer were reported in the neighborhood near Cap Sante Park. They included four fawns, a young doe and an adult buck. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Europe Is Planning a Border Carbon Tax. Is Canada Next?
Such tariffs on imports ensure polluting producers aren’t just pushed overseas. Ultimately, a global approach is needed. Michelle Gamage reports. (The Tyee)

Hearing set on DNR land transfer
The state Department of Natural Resources plans a public hearing in Quilcene this coming Monday to discuss a proposed Inter-Trust Exchange. The exchange would allow for the future transfer of up to 826 acres of State Forest Land Trust forestland near Quilcene into the DNR-managed Dabob Bay Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA), DNR said in a press release. It would be for equal-valued parcels of Common School Trust forestland in the same area. All parcels involved in the transaction would remain in state ownership. Leah Leach reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

This island creek once had a strong salmon run. Locals are trying to make it so again
A long degraded salmon stream is close to being restored after over a decade of hard work by some Pierce County residents. Puget Sound’s Anderson Island is home to Schoolhouse Creek, which formerly had coho salmon and has seen their return in recent years. More formal restoration efforts at Schoolhouse Creek have been going on since the late 2000s as park district commissioners continue to work on the project’s final legs. Schoolhouse Creek flows into Oro Bay and has historically been home to salmon runs and breeding grounds, according to a historical overview of the creek submitted alongside a February 2020 Washington House of Representatives transportation budget request. Abby Miller reports. (Tacoma News Tribune)

Birdman of Protection Island
At dusk on an early summer evening, Protection Island is silhouetted in a deep, red sunset.  A gentle breeze carries the murmurs of nesting gulls clustered along the shore and bluffs. Drifting in a boat off the southeast shore, Jim Hayward studies the scene through binoculars. “Any time now,” he says. Twenty minutes after the sunset, the serenity is broken by a few bird calls, then by a hundred, then thousands.  “Here they go,” he announces. Ross Anderson writes. (Rainshadow Journal)


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  245 AM PDT Fri Jul 23 2021   
TODAY
 Variable wind to 10 kt becoming N 5 to 15 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 1 ft at 6 seconds. A  slight chance of showers. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 1 ft at 6 seconds. 
SAT
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the afternoon. W  swell 3 ft at 7 seconds. 
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 15 to 25 kt easing to 10 to 20 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. W swell 5 ft at 9 seconds. 
SUN
 Light wind becoming W to 10 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 1 ft or less. W swell 5 ft at 8 seconds.


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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Thursday, July 22, 2021

7/22 Queen Anne's Lace 'dead zones,' Fairy Cr reporting, native plants, woolly dog, oyster recall, derelict boats, wild salmon menu, rodenticide ban, Caroline Gibson

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Queen Anne's Lace [Gardening Know How]

Queen Anne's Lace
Daucus carota
The Queen Anne’s lace plant, also known as wild carrot, is a wildflower herb found in many parts of the United States, yet it was originally from Europe. Queen Anne’s lace can reach heights of about 1 to 4 feet (30-120 cm.) high. This plant has attractive, fern-like foliage and tall, hairy stems that hold a flattened cluster of tiny white flowers, with a single dark-colored floret just off its center. You can find these biennials in bloom during their second year from spring on into fall. (Gardening Know How)

Low oxygen levels off Northwest coast raise fears of marine ‘dead zones’
Low oxygen levels measured off the coast of Oregon and Washington are raising fears of large “dead zones” that could wipe out crabs and bottom-dwelling fish within. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, announced Wednesday that researchers have detected unseasonably low oxygen levels in a large area off the Pacific coast. Bradley W. Parks reports. (OPB)

Judge rules in favour of journalists' access to Fairy Creek blockade
The Canadian Association of Journalists, along with a coalition of news organizations and press freedom groups, has won a court case that will require the RCMP to grant media full access to the Fairy Creek blockades. The judge ruled that such access must be granted unless there is a genuine operational or safety reason to restrict it. (CBC) 4 things we learned from the court case challenging the RCMP’s treatment of journalists at Fairy Creek logging blockades  Mike De Souza report. (The Narwhal)

Indigenous Plants Forum raises awareness of native botanical treasures
A Lopez Island-based nonprofit says the protection of critical habitat for native plants can also preserve a wealth of traditional knowledge. The group is working with private landowners to raise awareness of culturally important plants hidden in the bogs and underbrush of Puget Sound's natural areas. Sarah DeWeerdt writes. (Salish Sea Currents Magazine)

What ever happened to the Salish woolly dog? Learn more about this extinct breed with virtual history lessons
Senaqwila Wyss wants people to know what really happened to the furry companions of her people. Wyss, who hails from the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish Nation), is the Indigenous cultural programmer at the Museum of North Vancouver and starting July 21, she will be holding virtual knowledge-sharing sessions on alternating Wednesdays that will look at the history and extinction of the Salish woolly dog. (CBC)

Samish Bay oyster recall issued, harvest closed due to bacteria-related illness
An illness caused by eating bad oysters is reaching record case numbers following the heat wave that baked the region, including its beaches.  The illness, caused by the marine bacteria vibrio parahaemolyticus, led to the closure of commercial oyster harvesting in Samish Bay on July 16 and, as of Tuesday, a recall of any oysters harvested from the bay since June 29. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Another cost of COVID: WA state saw sharp increase in derelict boats in 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic caused some people to neglect their boats, one state official says. The state’s Derelict Vessel Removal Program saw an uptick of derelict vessels mid-2020, said Troy Wood, program manager of the state’s Derelict Vessel Removal Program. That was around the same time Washington state had its stay-home order. Angelica Relente reports. (Tacoma News Tribune)

A stronger electricity grid is crucial to cutting carbon. Does that make it green?
Three viewpoints: A proposal to lay cables beneath the Columbia River is met with skepticism from an Indigenous activist and the river’s advocates. Peter Fairley reports. Investigate West)

Some B.C. restaurants remove wild salmon from menu in response to declining stocks
The Naramata Inn in the Okanagan has temporarily removed wild salmon from its summer menu, a decision chef Ned Bell said he made in an effort to allow salmon populations to recover. "It is a species that needs all the love we can give it." Bell, who is a former Ocean Wise executive chef, said that it's a temporary measure and he looks forward to bringing salmon back on his menu and supporting community fisheries again. The Vancouver-based Ocean Wise Conservation Association rates the sustainability of seafood so that consumers can avoid eating species that are over-fished or in decline. Michelle Gomez reports. (CBC)

B.C. bans rat-killing rodenticides for 18 months over wildlife concerns
B.C. is banning the use of rat-killing rodenticides over concerns the poison is inadvertently killing owls, among other wildlife. The ban will last 18 months and follows a series of prohibitions at the municipal level in B.C., including in North Vancouver. The provincial order took effect Wednesday, prohibiting second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARS) specifically, which the province said is particularly strong and risks the secondary poisoning of animals who consume poisoned rodents. (CBC)

Caroline F. Gibson February 6, 1964 - July 11, 2021
Caroline passed away at home with her partner Walt and her sister Mary Jane by her side in Port Townsend on July 11, 2021 following a lengthy battle with cancer. (Port Townsend Leader)

Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  244 AM PDT Thu Jul 22 2021   
TODAY
 Light wind becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves less than 1 ft becoming 2 ft or less in the afternoon. SW  swell 2 ft at 15 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 2 ft at 13 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told