Tuesday, November 4, 2014

11/4 Floods, train trench, Marshland, Seattle shore, sea star wasting, pipe hearings, hi-def sonar, BEnv degree

Tom Magliozzi (Richard Howard/NPR)
Tom Magliozzi: As Warm In Real Life As He Was On The Radio
Susan Stamberg remembers the elder half of "Click and Clack the Tappet Brothers" of Car Talk. (NPR/KPLU)

North Shore flooding: Lynn Valley creeks overflow, heavy rain hits Dundarave
Creeks overflowed and flooded streets and homes in Lynn Valley in the midst of heavy rainfall Monday night. Multiple flooding calls have also been reported in West Vancouver. (CBC)

City of Edmonds releases train trench costs, estimated at $250 million to $290 million
Building a train trench to address increasing train traffic along the Edmonds waterfront could cost between $250 million to $290 million, according to a preliminary cost and feasibility analysis conducted by engineering firm Tetra Tech on behalf of the City of Edmonds. The initial study was commissioned by Edmonds Mayor Dave Earling as part of the city’s effort to assess the feasibility of potential solutions to what he calls an “alarming increase” in train traffic blocking critical access to the Edmonds waterfront. This study comes on the heels of the Mayor’s town hall meeting last month about train traffic in Edmonds. (My Edmonds News)

Everett Marshland’s future a bit muddy
Low-lying farmland could be turned into hundreds of acres of restored wetland. Or, in the opinion of one farmer, it could be a huge boondoggle. The area is the Everett Marshland on the eastern edge of the Lowell neighborhood, on the west bank of the Snohomish River. It's 829 acres of mostly agricultural land, with small landholders, community gardens and larger farms. The city of Everett owns more than 300 acres of the area. Chris Winters reports. (Everett Herald)

The shoreline that once was
In today’s highly-regulated, environmentally-conscious shoreline development era (well, mostly; the occasional rogue goes off and reroutes a river without permission) you might be forgiven for imagining the Puget Sound shoreline as ancient, historic, and immutable. Certainly, at least in the Seattle area, little has changed at the wave-lapped edges of the waterfront in the past decade or so. But the coming changes proposed to the downtown Seattle waterfront on the heels of the viaduct demolition and replacement project is sparking new discussion about what the urban waterfront might be — including proposals for a new public marina (although as cost estimates have increased, the city has made noise about dramatically scaling back any redevelopment efforts there). Scott Wilson blogs. (Three Sheets Northwest) See also: Brighter future for salmon at downtown seawall   (Salish Sea Currents)

Seattle Aquarium awarded grant to study sea-star wasting disease
The Seattle Aquarium has been awarded a $75,000 grant from the Boeing Company to support the aquarium’s efforts to investigative and respond to a disease that has affected millions of sea stars along the West Coast. Paige Cornwell reports. (Seattle Times)

Kinder Morgan pipeline hearings a 'farce,' says former BC Hydro head
The former head of BC Hydro, Marc Eliesen, has pulled out of the federal hearings on the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline project. In a scathing letter to the National Energy Board, Eliesen calls the public hearing process around the project "a farce," noting the removal of the oral cross-examination phase. "Unfortunately, I have come to the conclusion that the board, through its decisions, is engaged in a public deception," the letter states. "Continued involvement with this process is a waste of time and effort, and represents a disservice to the public interest because it endorses a fraudulent process."   (CBC)

If you like to watch: High definition comes to ocean floor
On Lake Union the University of Washington oceanographic research vessel Clifford Barnes is being used to showing scientists and students the newest in underwater mapping imagery that creates pictures using sound waves. The technology was developed by Konsberg Underwater Technology out of Norway, that maintains offices in Lynnwood. It's been used around the world to help scientists map the bottom of lakes, rivers and oceans in detail. Glen Farley reports. (KING)

SFU degree will train environmental managers
A new Simon Fraser University four-year program will train students to become better decision-makers and consultants when it comes to environmental stewardship. The Bachelor of Environment (BEnv) degree, the only one offered in Canada, brings disciplines together for an integrated approach to the effects and science of global environmental issues, as well as possible solutions. Unlike Bachelor of Environmental Studies or Bachelor of Environmental Science degrees, the interdisciplinary program combines humanistic, socio-economic and scientific approaches. Shawn Conner reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST TUE NOV 4 2014
TODAY
W WIND 10 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 2 FT. W SWELL 9 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
TONIGHT
SW WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING S AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 8 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE RAIN.
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