Friday, July 25, 2014

7/25 No-pipe fund, coal trains, marine birds, false killer, composting, no hope Hope, Niaz Dorry, Vic sewer

Seattle derailment, 7/24 (Dana Robinson Slote/KPLU)
Northern Gateway opponents turn to crowd-sourcing to raise at least $150,000
British Columbia First Nations and environmental groups are launching a fundraising campaign for the coming legal battle against the Northern Gateway pipeline. Sierra Club B.C., in partnership with Victoria-based legal defence fund RAVEN Trust, and several northern aboriginal communities have created the website Pull-Together.ca. (Canadian Press)

Report: Coal trains planned for state carry issues, bring jobs
Communities throughout the Puget Sound region would need overpasses and underpasses costing $50 million to $200 million each to prevent traffic from being stopped by a proposed 18 daily coal trains, a government report says. Elected officials on the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) sounded the alarm Thursday about the magnitude of traffic delays, and the hazards of more trains and people crossing paths. Mike Lindblom reports. (Seattle Times)

Once-common marine birds disappearing from our coast
From white-winged scoters and surf scoters to long-tailed ducks, murres, loons and some seagulls, the number of everyday marine birds here has plummeted dramatically in recent decades. The reasons are often complex, but for many the loss of forage fish like herring might hold a clue. Craig Welch reports. (Seattle Times)

False killer whale calf now nursing at Vancouver aquarium
After many failed attempts, a false killer whale calf rescued near Tofino, B.C., earlier this month has reached a milestone and has started nursing from a bottle, according to staff at the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue Centre. Head veterinarian Martin Haulena said the fact the calf is now suckling is a great sign of improvement, and the male calf has been slowly increasing its strength, buoyancy and co-ordination. Steve Lus reports. (CBC)

Seattle Considers Fining Residents For Failing To Compost
The city of Seattle might start fining residents who put food waste in the garbage instead of the compost bin — the latest idea to push for better recycling rates. Dozens of cities nationwide now give residents the option of putting their household food scraps in a curbside compost bin. Seattle is looking at making it a requirement. Cassandra Profita reports. (EarthFix)

Abandon all hope: State Rep. Hope to resign over out-of-state voter registration
Republican state Rep. Mike Hope said Thursday he intends to resign from office after it was revealed he’s been registered to vote in two states, Washington and Ohio, since last summer. Jerry Cornfield reports. (Everett Herald)

If you like to listen: Who Feeds Us Matters: Fishers and Farmers Taking Back Control of the Food Supply ---Interview w/ Niaz Dorry
Fish and how they're caught aren't always included in the 'alternative food movement'. But in some communities, “community supported fisheries” or CSF's are catching on. Similar to “community supported agriculture” or CSA's, the goal is to reclaim local sovereignty and food justice. Martha Baskin reports. (Green Acre Radio)

Sewage treatment ‘will happen,’ says B.C. premier, doesn’t say when
Treatment of Victoria’s sewage “will happen,” British Columbia Premier Christy Clark promised members of Washington’s congressional delegation in a terse letter. She did not say when.... Clark parried an angry letter, sent last month by Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., as well as six U.S. House members from Washington. Joel Connelly reports. (SeattlePI.com)

Kids search for critters in marine muck during Mud Flat Safari
With their rain boots on and their hoods pulled up, the “mini explorers” signed up for the Mud Flat Safari at Padilla Bay were ready to head to the water. “It’s your day,” said class leader Anna-mai Christmas, an AmeriCorps education assistant with Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and Breazeale Interpretive Center. “You are the explorers today.” Kera Wanielista reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Discovery Bay closed to shellfish harvesting as diarrhetic shellfish poisoning risk rises
Discovery Bay has been closed to recreational harvesting of all species of shellfish because of the risk of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning, Jefferson County Public Health announced Thursday. The state Department of Health found the marine biotoxins that cause diarrhetic shellfish poisoning, or DSP, in concentrations above the safe level of 16 micrograms per 100 grams of tissue, according to Michael Dawson, water quality lead for the county department. (Peninsula Daily News)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 320 AM PDT FRI JUL 25 2014
TODAY
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING NW TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 7 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF
 SHOWERS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 FT AT 7 SECONDS.
SAT
W WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING NW 10 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...BECOMING 10 TO 15 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
SUN
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT...BECOMING NW TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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