Wednesday, July 16, 2014

7/16 BC pipe, oil train, Shannon Pt., Van aquarium, seastar dying, Fraser flood, Cowichan drought, Bainbridge shore

Seattle Sunday sunset (Jessica Aguilar-Beth/KOMO)
Was the Best Sunset in Years the Result of Wildfire Smoke?
Climate scientist Cliff Mass on why the Sunday sunset was both spectacular and special. (It wasn't the smoke.)

Trans Mountain pipeline review delayed pending new route studies
A regulatory review of the proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain oil pipeline through British Columbia will be delayed by almost seven months while Kinder Morgan gathers information requested by the National Energy Board. The company now prefers a new route through Burnaby Mountain, in Metro Vancouver, and must complete further feasibility studies. Compiling the information could take an order from the National Energy Board that forces the City of Burnaby to co-operate. (CBC) See also: Burnaby's refusal to co-operate forces NEB to delay Trans Mountain review (Vancouver Sun)

Groups seek ban of oil in older railroad tank cars
Environmental groups asked the U.S. Department of Transportation to immediately ban shipments of volatile crude oil in older railroad tank cars, citing oil train wrecks and explosions and the agency's own findings that accidents pose an imminent hazard. The petition filed Tuesday by the Sierra Club and ForestEthics seeks an emergency order within 30 days to prohibit crude oil from the Bakken region of the Northern Plains and elsewhere from being carried in the older tank cars, known as DOT-111s. Accident investigators have reported that the cars rupture or puncture during wrecks, even at slow speeds. Phuong Le and Matthew Brown report. (Associated Press) See also: State firefighters want Inslee to halt Bakken crude by rail till safety concerns addressed  Erin Hart reports. (Daily World)

Shannon Point Marine Center gets new director
Shannon Point Marine Center’s new director has officially joined the team of researchers tucked away on a 78-acre forested campus with a 3,000-foot stretch of undisturbed shoreline. The Western Washington University facility in Anacortes drew director Erika McPhee-Shaw from her former post as an associate professor in California because of the intricate level of research and coordination between scientists. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Vancouver Aquarium whales program to be reviewed at Park Board meeting
The continuing controversy over Vancouver Aquarium's captive whale and dolphin program will be addressed at a special meeting of the Park Board on Saturday, July 26.... After hearing the staff report, the Vancouver Aquarium will present to the board on its programming, education and rehabilitation programs, then registered speakers will be invited to comment. (CBC)

Sea star die-off reaches Florence
....On the Oregon coast, according to CoastWatch Volunteer Coordinator Fawn Custer, “Last December, we had less than 1 percent of sea star wasting. By May 1, more than 5 percent of sea stars were affected. Now, I would say, in some areas, it is up to 90 percent.”  Jack Davis reports. (Siuslaw News)

Strategy released to deal with rising threat of catastrophic Fraser River flooding
A massive flood of the Fraser River has the potential to be the most expensive natural disaster in Canada, affecting more than 300,000 people, $50 billion worth of infrastructure and the B.C. economy. The threat, which is believed to be a one-in-50 year occurrence, has prompted senior levels of government, along with 25 municipalities, two regional districts and the Fraser Basin Council, to join together to develop an integrated flood plan from Hope to Richmond, recognizing that the Lower Mainland is highly vulnerable to river and coastal flooding as a result of snowpack, heavy rainfalls, tsunami and debris flow. Kelly Sinoski reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Low water in Cowichan River threatening fish, mill — and summer fun
The Cowichan River is getting so low there’s talk of pumping water over the weir at Cowichan Lake just to keep enough water downstream for spawning salmon, industry and a myriad of water users. The water flow in the river over the last few weeks has dropped to five cubic metres per second from seven. Sandra McCulloch reports. (Times Colonist)

Bainbridge council passes updated Shoreline Master Program
The Bainbridge Island City Council has given its final stamp of approval on the city's Shoreline Master Program update. In a narrow 4-3 council vote after a public hearing this week, the council approved the Shoreline Master Program ordinance and it is now on its way to the state Department of Ecology to become law. Cecilia Garza reports. (Bainbridge Review)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT WED JUL 16 2014
TODAY
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING W TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 8 SECONDS. PATCHY FOG THIS
 MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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