Tuesday, July 8, 2014

7/8 Clean water regs, Duwamish, coal poll, oil train traffic, urban fumes, jellyfish boom

Sanderlings (Tom Grey/BirdNote)
If you like to listen: Matthiessen Wind Birds
In The Wind Birds: Shorebirds of North America, nature writer and novelist Peter Matthiessen wrote: “The restlessness of shorebirds, their kinship with the distance and swift seasons, the wistful signal of their voices down the long coastlines of the world make them, for me, the most affecting of wild creatures. I think of them as birds of the wind, as ‘wind birds.’” Matthiessen died in April 2014, leaving a rich and enduring body of work that reflects his connection with birds such as these Sanderlings. (BirdNote)

Getting tougher on water pollution standards ... but will the water really be cleaner?
Washington’s clean-water regulations to ensure the safety of eating fish from local waters are indefensibly lax, everyone agrees. That’s about to change, but without broader cleanup, water will still be polluted. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times) See also: Boeing fears regulatory wave amid battle over fish, water pollution

The Duwamish: River of no return?
Washington's most polluted river is about to become the site of a huge cleanup effort. Will it be enough? Dan Person reports. (Crosscut)

Poll: More Northwest Residents Support Coal Export
More people in the Northwest support coal export terminals than oppose them. Those are the results of a new survey. But people who took the survey didn’t feel very strongly about why they supported coal exports.... DHM Research surveyed 1,200 residents in Washington, Oregon and Idaho from June 25-30. The poll found 47 percent of Northwest residents say they support coal exports. That’s up a little bit from last year’s survey, which showed 41 percent or respondents supporting coal exports. 34 percent opposed Northwest coal exports, and 19 percent didn’t know. Courtney Flatt reports. (EarthFix)

BNSF data show recent drop in state’s oil-train traffic
The latest disclosure from BNSF Railway shows a drop in the number of volatile oil-train shipments that moved through Washington state in a single week. Phuong Le reports. (Associated Press)

UW Study: Urban Fumes Cause Pollinating Moths To Fly Like 'Stumbling Drunks'
As much as one-third of our food supply depends on pollinators like insects and birds that fertilize plants when they fly between blossoms. But moths, one such pollinator, get confused by urban fumes like car exhaust, which keep them from finding the flowers they feed on, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Washington and the University of Arizona.  Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KPLU)

Jellyfish population boom wreaking havoc worldwide
Alone they may not seem like much, but as jellyfish band together, their populations are exploding in parts of the world, causing damage that can cost hundreds of millions of dollars to repair. In one reported incident, they capsized a fishing trawler and, in others, caused near meltdowns at nuclear power plants. The growing phenomenon is being studied by PhD student Lucas Brotz with the Sea Around Us project at the University of British Columbia's Fisheries Centre. Charlie Cho reports. (CBC)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 855 PM PDT MON JUL 7 2014
TUE
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING W 10 TO 20 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT...THEN 1 TO 3 FT IN THE AFTERNOON. W SWELL
 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG IN THE MORNING.
TUE NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...EASING TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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