Wednesday, August 7, 2013

8/7 Rockfish habitat, native oysters, Kitsap shellfish, False Creek coliform, derelict vessel rules, Robert Paine,BC gas, oil train halt

Canary rockfish (WDFW)
The National Marine Fisheries Service proposes to designate almost 1,200 square miles of Puget Sound as critical habitat for three species of endangered rockfish. The habitat protection follows the 2010 decision to list yelloweye, canary and bocaccio rockfish under the Endangered Species Act. The Fisheries Service says the rockfish are vulnerable to overfishing because they have long lives and mature slowly with sporadic reproduction. Tuesday's designation will require federal agencies to make sure their actions don't harm rockfish habitat. The protected area in Puget Sound overlaps existing critical habitat for Puget Sound Chinook and Hood Canal summer-run chum, bull trout and Southern Resident killer whales. Critical habitat listed for Puget Sound rockfish  Also, if they haven’t erected a paywall, Chris Dunagan reports: Habitat protection proposed for endangered rockfish in Puget Sound

Kwiaht researchers have relocated over 200 mature native Olympia oysters from Fidalgo Bay in Anacortes to Fisherman Bay on Lopez as the first stage of state-approved recovery of this ecologically important and tasty bivalve in San Juan County. The transplants are the offspring of oysters collected on Lopez over a decade ago by the Puget Sound Restoration Fund, spawned out in the Lummi Indian Nation shellfish hatchery, and seeded in Fidalgo Bay as a habitat restoration project of the Skagit County Marine Resources Committee. Meanwhile, wild Olympia oysters disappeared from the San Juan Islands. Coordinating the return of Olympia oysters were Kwiaht’s Russel Barsh and Dr. Paul Dinnel, a Shannon Point Marine Center biologist and a member of the SCMRC, who was instrumental in the Fidalgo Bay oyster restoration program.  Dinnel says that, unlike the widespread, larger Pacific oyster, introduced in our waters in the 1920s, the Olympia is a “brooding” species. Native oysters make a comeback

Local efforts to improve water quality continue to pay off, as demonstrated by the opening of 162 acres of shellfish beds around Kingston’s Appletree Cove. The opening will allow for future geoduck harvesting in the deep, offshore area, according to Mark Toy of the Washington Department of Health. Previously, shellfish harvesting was prohibited in and beyond the cove, mainly because of discharges from Kingston’s sewage-treatment plant and the presence of the Kingston Marina. But a new treatment plant, with an outfall pipe that extends nearly a mile offshore, has changed the situation dramatically, Toy said. Chris Dunagan reports. Approved shellfish area expanded near Kingston

The coliform counts in East False Creek are almost twice the level safe for swimming and wading in the water, tests show, with counts also inching up for Sunset Beach in English Bay. But Vancouver Coastal Health says the danger from the contamination should not be blown out of proportion. The risk of infection goes up once the coliform count hits 200 bacteria per 100 ml of water. Coliform counts for East False Creek - between Science World and the Cambie Street Bridge - are 380 per 100 ml, Coastal Health says. The area is used by kayakers and paddle boarders, but is not a popular spot for swimming or wading, so Coastal Health says they have not posted a public warning. False Creek coliform count rises

The Washington Department of Ecology is developing a new permit that lays out clear rules for the deconstruction of derelict vessels over water. Currently, any approved dismantling of an abandoned or defunct ship must happen at a dry-dock facility. But Ecology officials hope establishing the permit will open a new door for the safe removal of some of the 153 derelict vessels now languishing on Washington waterways. Eric Florip reports. Washington Developing New Rules For Derelict Vessels

Ecologists worldwide credit the work of a University of Washington biology professor for advancing the way we understand the importance of so-called “apex species” in nature. Now, Professor Emeritus Robert T. Paine’s work is being recognized with Japan’s International Cosmos Prize this year. The prize honors efforts that promote the harmonious coexistence of nature and mankind. It carries an award of 40 million yen. In today’s exchange, that's worth about $408,000.  Lisa Brooks reports. Retired UW Professor Wins International Cash Prize For Ecology Work

TransCanada Corp. (TSX:TRP) says it's building a $1.5-billion extension to its pipeline system in northeastern British Columbia that will help deliver natural gas to an export terminal planned for Prince Rupert, B.C. The North Montney Mainline will extend TransCanada's existing Groundbirch pipeline by adding some 305 kilometres of new large-diameter pipe. Progress Energy, a subsidiary of Malaysian energy giant Petronas, has signed up to ship two billion cubic feet per day on the North Montney Mainline. TransCanada says it's also in talks with other potential customers. TransCanada building pipeline extension in northeastern B.C. for $1.5 billion  

Rail traffic may begin running through Lac-M├ęgantic again this week, but the Montreal, Maine and Atlantic railway has decided it will stop hauling oil after one of its trains derailed and exploded here last month. “It’s proven to be more trouble than it’s worth, and I guess that’s putting this mildly,” company chairman Ed Burkhardt said on Monday, a month after a runaway MMA train exploded downtown, killing 47 people and levelling much of the town. “We don’t plan to continue with oil transportation. That traffic is going to go other ways, not over our lines,” he said. Railway to stop transporting oil after Lac-Megantic disaster

Now, your tug weather--
 WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 850 PM PDT TUE AUG 6 2013
DENSE FOG ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL NOON PDT WEDNESDAY
WED
W WIND TO 10 KT...RISING TO 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 3 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 FT AT 8 SECONDS. WIDESPREAD DENSE FOG...BECOMING AREAS OF DENSE FOG IN THE AFTERNOON.
WED NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 9 SECONDS. WIDESPREAD DENSE FOG DEVELOPING.

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