Thursday, August 22, 2013

8/22 Salmon survival, bleeding herring, no pipe sign, San Juan MRC, Seahurst Beach, B'ham water, whale watch, Thurston bag ban

Quinault fishing (Edward Curtis 1913)
Leaders on salmon research and recovery from the U. S. and Canada came together in Seattle Wednesday to announce a new project. It’s called the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project and it’s meant to address a major question: Why aren’t salmon and steelhead in Washington and Canadian waters recovering, despite the millions of dollars that have been spent on research and habitat restoration? “We have a fairly clear idea of what salmon need and what they’re doing in the freshwater environment. We know considerably less about the marine systems,” said Jacques White, executive director of Long Live The Kings. The Seattle-based non-profit is coordinating the effort along with the Pacific Salmon Foundation in B.C. Ashley Ahearn reports. Can-Am Leaders Launch Salmon Recovery Effort

If you like to watch: Bettina Hansen photographs Butterfly buoys float Duwamish

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans has confirmed a report by independent researcher Alexandra Morton that there are diseased herring in Johnstone Strait, near the north end of Vancouver Island. But Arlene Tompkins, acting manager of salmon health for DFO, said it is too early to say what is causing the herring to hemorrhage or how serious the outbreak is. Mark Hume reports. Bleeding herring in Johnstone Strait tested for disease  

A controversial anti-pipeline sign on the side of a grocery store in Burns Lake, B.C., will be allowed to remain, the local village council has ruled. Last month, the billboard on the side of Gwyn's Green Grocer sparked a controversy with the message, "Pure water. Wild salmon. No Enbridge pipeline." The village council received some complaints about the sign being offensive, and launched a review. At a meeting last night, councillors decided the sign could stay. 'No Enbridge pipeline' sign stays, says B.C. town  

A newly established policy that ushered in term limits to San Juan County's numerous advisory committees could lead to a major overhaul of the MRC. Eight positions on the Marine Resources Committee will be appointed by the County Council in the coming weeks and a new MRC coordinator will soon be announced. On July 30, Philip Green, Robin Hirsch and Chuck Schietinger were appointed to MRC positions 2, 1 and 4, respectively. Steve Wehrly reports. Will term limits lead to MRC overhaul?

It was a busy morning along the north shore of Seahurst Beach park where naturalists from the Seattle Aquarium and other volunteers combed the beach trying to find various sea creatures that need to be relocated. Next month, the north wall will be torn down. Without help, the creatures that live here could be killed during the construction process. Cassie Campbell reports. At Seahurst Beach, volunteers get their hands in the sand where the critters live

The city (of Bellingham) is considering a new agreement that would enable it to pull water out of the Nooksack River in Lynden and Ferndale, instead of at the existing Middle Fork diversion site much farther upstream. The other parties to the deal would be the city of Lynden and the Whatcom County Public Utility District. Lynden and the PUD have existing river water intake facilities that the city could use. The Washington Department of Ecology also would have to give the new arrangement its blessing. The people involved say there is no actual water transfer deal in the works, but the new arrangement - if approved - could be one small step toward a solution of countywide water rights issues that have bedeviled local governments for many years. John Stark reports. Nooksack River deal could set stage for shift of Bellingham water supply

When you think of going whale watching, you probably envision taking a boat. But there’s a place on San Juan Island that’s considered one of the best places in the world to see killer whales from shore. Informally, the Lime Kiln Point State Park is called Whale Watch Park, and for good reason. Volunteer guide Patti Wickham with Friends of Lime Kiln says when the orcas come by, you can really see them. “I’ve watched people get totally soaked by the breaching and the splashing. It’s pretty cool,” Wickham said. Paula Wissel reports. San Juan Island Park Offers World-Class Whale Watching from Shore

A public hearing discussing the possible ban of plastic carryout bags in unincorporated Thurston County has been set for next month, according to a news release. The public hearing before the Thurston County Commissioners is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Sept. 24 in Building One of the Thurston County Courthouse. The proposed ordinance referring to the ban was announced shortly after Thurston County waste and recycling provider LeMay Incorporated said they would discontinue collecting plastic carryout bags and other plastic film Oct. 1. Chelsea Krotzer reports. Thurston County to hold public hearing on plastic bag ban

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT THU AUG 22 2013
TODAY
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING NW 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...EASING TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
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