Wednesday, August 14, 2013

8/14 Victoria sewage, BC salmon, BC bottled water, cable ferry

Ander Monson in Orion Magazine writes: "Dear squash, as noun or food or racket game you lack appeal. Though, almost onomatopoeia, you’re a satisfying verb—sibilant, fibrous, quick, and harsh, interior made exterior by sudden pressure: you promise a gross explosion...." Wait, there’s more. Dear Squash

Greater Victoria’s troubled sewage treatment project will face its latest hurdle Wednesday as politicians vote, yet again, on whether to pause and review the plan. The Capital Regional District board will consider a motion by Saanich Coun. Vic Derman to launch an independent review of the $783-million sewage project, seek innovative new ideas and pursue a delay from the federal and provincial governments. Rob Shaw reports. Politicians face another vote on whether to put sewage plan on hold  

The captain of a seine boat that dumped pink salmon during an aboriginal fishery in Johnstone Strait said Tuesday he is the victim of federal policy and that he takes care not to waste salmon. “I’ve been doing this 15 years and we’ve been very efficient and very modernized in the way we handle our fish,” said Josh Duncan, a member of the Campbell River band and captain of the 25-metre Western King.... Duncan explained that during the two-week native fishery he kept almost 20,000 sockeye and 16,000 pinks. He also released 52,000 live pinks of which he estimated a mortality rate not greater than 15 per cent — which equates to just under 8,000 fish. Larry Pynn reports. Seine fisherman defends dumping of pink salmon during aboriginal fishery in Johnstone Strait  Also: Bounty of the Seas: Sockeye’s rare, but there are plenty of other salmon

The price of a litre of bottled water in B.C. is often higher than a litre of gasoline. However, the price paid by the world’s largest bottled water company for taking 265 million litres of fresh water every year from a well in the Fraser Valley — not a cent. Because of B.C.’s lack of groundwater regulation, Nestlé Waters Canada — a division of the multi-billion-dollar Switzerland-based Nestlé Group, the world’s largest food company — is not required to measure, report, or pay a penny for the millions of litres of water it draws from Hope and then sells across Western Canada. Dan Fumano reports. The ‘Wild West’ of groundwater: Billion-dollar Nestlé extracting B.C.’s drinking water for free

As British Columbia prepares to build the longest cable ferry in the world, residents of the two Gulf Islands it will serve are hoping to shame the provincial government into halting the project. “I’m going to try to publicly embarrass them,” said Peter Kimmerly, a former ferry and icebreaker captain who has led opposition to the new ferry plan for the route between Buckley Bay on Vancouver Island and Denman Island. The ferry would also be used by those crossing Denman to get to Hornby Island, home to about 1,000 permanent residents and up to 7,000 vacationers during the summer. The BC Ferries board approved the plan last November for the 1.9-kilometre ferry, which will save the corporation 50 per cent of its current labour costs and up to 55 per cent of its fuel costs – or about $2-million a year. Frances Bula reports. Cable-ferry plan draws protests from Gulf Islands  

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 527 AM PDT WED AUG 14 2013
TODAY
SE WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 FT AT 7 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY.
TONIGHT
NE WIND TO 10 KT IN THE EVENING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 FT AT 8 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY.

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