Monday, October 6, 2014

10/6 Seabird food, coal dust, Capitol Lake, First Nation land, cove beaches, stormwater, marine mammals

(PHOTO: Laurie MacBride)
The Shape Shifters
Laurie MacBride in Eye on Environment writes: "Maybe my imagination was running rampant that day, but when I stepped out of my kayak onto a beautiful little pocket beach, I saw what seemed like a trio of quirky faces at the head of the bay. When I looked back a bit later, they’d morphed into a large prehistoric fish looking out to sea – and by the time I left, I saw something else entirely. But of course, that’s the shape shifting nature of the sandstone rock that dominates our shorelines here in BC’s Gulf Islands…."

Stealing Fish To Study Seabirds
Seabird populations in Puget Sound have declined since the 1970s and scientists believe pollution is partially to blame. But how do you prove that? Study what the seabirds are eating. A new paper published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin found that seabirds in Puget Sound are eating fish that are two to four times more contaminated than fish on Washington’s outer coast. Ashley Ahearn reports. (EarthFix)

Coal dust seen as serious environmental threat: poll
The majority of Metro Vancouver residents polled in a new survey see coal dust as a serious environmental threat. The respondents are also concerned that coal dust from a recently approved loading facility at Fraser Surrey Docks will harm regional air quality, according to findings from an Insights West survey. Matthew Robinson reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Dam malfunction causes Capitol Lake to suddenly drain
A computer malfunction at the Capitol Lake dam Friday night caused the lake to unexpectedly empty into Puget Sound. No damage to fisheries was reported, according to Jim Erskine, spokesman for the Department of Enterprise Services, the state landlord agency that oversees the dam and adjacent park. The north lake basin around Heritage Park retained water but water was significantly lower in a southern basin, which is fed by the Deschutes River. By late afternoon, rising tides were pouring salt water back through the dam into the lake. Brad Shannon reports. (Olympian)

Land development deal with B.C. First Nations launches new era
The precedent-setting deal the federal government and local First Nations reached on the Jericho military base and former RCMP headquarters in Vancouver will launch a new phase of land development in the region. But, experts say, unlike development on local reserve lands, cities will have direct control over this new wave of First Nations-involved development through their city zoning laws Aboriginal-law specialists, developers, commercial brokers and city planners say the ability for First Nations to come to agreements – not just with the federal government, but with each other – is unlocking potential for many other sites in the region. Frances Bulba reports. (Globe and Mail)

Port Angeles gains two cove-like beaches as waterfront improvement project continues
Construction of the city's new beaches is complete. But residents won't be able to gaze at Port Angeles Harbor from them until spring. The areas, called pocket beaches, are the first step in creating a new city park between the Valley Creek estuary to the west and the waterfront esplanade. Keith Thorpe reports. (Peninsula Daily)

New era in stormwater management is here
Ready or not, low-impact development is coming to a neighborhood near you. Some midsize local jurisdictions in Western Washington, including Thurston County, Lacey, Olympia and Tumwater, have until Dec. 31, 2016, to change their development rules and regulations to require developers and builders to retain and treat on-site any stormwater their projects generate. John Dodge reports. (Olympian)

B.C.’s bounty of marine mammals saved by ‘shift in attitudes’
Whale research in British Columbia has come a long way from the days when the Department of Fisheries and Oceans mounted a 50-calibre machine gun at Seymour Narrows north of Campbell River with the aim of shooting Killer whales to save more salmon for anglers. That was back in 1960, but attitudes and practices towards marine mammals, especially whales, have changed greatly, said marine mammal scientist John Ford. Dirk Meissner reports. (Canadian Press)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 900 PM PDT SUN OCT 5 2014
MON
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING W TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 13 SECONDS. AREAS OF DRIZZLE OR
 FOG IN THE MORNING. A CHANCE OF RAIN IN THE AFTERNOON.
MON NIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 13 SECONDS. PATCHY FOG AFTER MIDNIGHT.
--
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