Thursday, October 16, 2014

10/16 Rockfish, Site C dam, orca talk, vessel deconstruction, Navy warfare, Oregon frog, Oly GBH

Dr. Milton Love and friends
Do otters eat a lot of rockfish?
Here's some irony. Rebounding rockfish populations have created a concern that river otters may be eating enough to hamper continuing population growth. “It's more of a lack of information,” said Joe Gaydos, director and chief scientist of SeaDoc Society. Predation on rockfish populations is poorly understood. “It's better to take a look at the issue.” Banning commercial fishing for rockfish on the U.S. side of the Salish Sea and creation of several marine protected areas probably have been effective in boosting the number of rockfish. But then there are those hungry otters. Sharon Wootton reports. (Everett Herald)

First Nations challenge to Site C approval could make dam a test case
BC Hydro has cleared major environmental hurdles for its Site C megaproject, but opposition from First Nations is almost certain to result in new court action. And that could make the dam a test case for the thorny legal question of when and how public interest can trump aboriginal claims. Wendy Stueck reports. (Glboe and Mail)

Protected zone for orcas? Find out about it at The Whale Trail’s upcoming Orca Talk
The Whale Trail brings Bruce Stedman of Orca Relief to C&P Coffee Company in West Seattle to discuss a a proposal for “A Protected Zone for Puget Sound Orcas,” 7 pm Thursday, October 30th. $5 suggested donation, kids free. Tickets at Brown Paper Tickets http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/902186

Ecology creates new permit for over-water vessel deconstruction
Marine vessels may now be disassembled over water under the terms of a new state permit that’s designed to protect water quality and prevents pollution. The Department of Ecology recently finalized the new Vessel Deconstruction General Permit. Businesses and boat owners who plan to dismantle older vessels while they are still in the water will need the permit prior to starting work. (Skagit Valley Herald)

West End residents line up to express worries to Navy over warfare range proposal
A plan to conduct electronic warfare training along the Pacific Coast and on the West End brought out more than 100 area residents for a community meeting with officials from the U.S. Navy and U.S. Forest Service. More than two dozen residents at the Tuesday night gathering expressed their environmental and safety concerns with the Pacific Northwest Electronic Warfare Range proposal, which calls for using one fixed and three mobile electronic emitters to help train aviators from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island in electronic warfare.  Mark Couhig reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Rare frog species takes leap into new life in Pierce County
Two dozen people were gathered in a Pierce County wetland to watch the newcomers begin their new lives. Then more than 150 dark green and mottled frogs – rare Oregon spotted frogs – took their first leaps into the wild at the end of September. Valery Jorgensen reports. (Tacoma News Tribune)

Land purchase will help protect great blue herons in Olympia
An Olympia woman has purchased land containing the city’s lone great blue heron colony in an effort to protect the birds from a nearby townhome development. This month, Alicia Elliott bought the 1.84-acre wooded parcel at the end of Dickinson Avenue Northwest on the city’s west side. The site includes the colony – also known as a heronry or rookery - with about 15 nests perched high in the trees. Andy Hobbs reports. (Olympian)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT THU OCT 16 2014
TODAY
SE WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS IN THE MORNING.
TONIGHT
SE WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. SW SWELL 6 FT AT 9 SECONDS...BUILDING TO 8 FT AT 10 SECONDS AFTER MIDNIGHT. RAIN
 LIKELY.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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