Wednesday, October 22, 2014

10/22 Stormin', BC LNG, Simushir, Lolita, Elwha film, orca reserve

Pacoderm sex (Washington Post)
If you like to watch: Scientists discover the origins of copulation  
The planet’s first act of sex happened 385 million years ago between two prehistoric fish called pacoderms, according to new research by Australian paleontologist John Long published in the journal Nature. (Washington Post)

Windstorm knocks out power to 80,000 in Metro Vancouver  (CBC) Heavy rain, strong winds pound Western Washington   (AP & KOMO)

New blog: My First World Series
Tuesday’s opening of World Series play brought to mind my first World Series in 1956 growing up in Hawaii....”

B.C. LNG tax rates lower than first promised  
The tax framework for B.C. LNG was announced Tuesday, with rates lower than those tabled in February's budget. Finance Minister Mike de Jong said the tax rate will start at 1.5 per cent and remain as such while LNG plants are operating at a loss, and capital investments are being recouped. The rate will rise to 3.5 per cent after four years where it will remain for another 20 years, when a final rate increase to five percent will be instituted in 2037. In February's budget, de Jong had tabled a two-tiered tax starting at 1.5 percent, eventually rising to seven per cent. (CBC) See also: B.C. lowers expectations for LNG windfall   (Globe and Mail)

Coast guard underestimated risk of fuel spill, mariner says
A veteran West Coast mariner says the Canadian Coast Guard significantly underestimated the ecological consequences of a possible fuel spill from a container ship off the coast of Haida Gwaii last week. “Everyone who loves this coast was just holding their breath,” said Brian Falconer, reached by cellphone north of Bella Bella, where he has spent two stormy weeks on the Achiever, the research vessel of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation. Falconer, who was captain of the 92-foot Maple Leaf schooner for 20 years, said the environmental threat posed by the Simushir was much worse than was stated Friday by coast guard assistant commissioner Roger Girouard. Louise Dickson reports. (Times Colonist)

'A day in the life of Lolita' sheds light on the orca's plight  
The troubling saga of Lolita, the southern resident orca whale in captivity and on display in a Florida marine amusement park, will be in the spotlight at the 2014 Big Apple Film Festival in New York City. "A Day in the Life of Lolita," is an eight-minute film that follows renowned marine biologist, Dr. Ingrid Vissner, into Miami's Seaquarium, Lolita's home for the last 44 years. "The film is about elevating our understanding of the Orcas, who are deserving of our respect," Whidbey Island-based Orca Network co-founder Howard Garett said. "And correcting this injustice." Director Daniel Azarian paints a compelling picture of Lolita's situation. Her holding tank, 80-by-35 feet, is described by Vissner as "tragically small." Emily Greenberg reports. (San Juan Journal)

'Return of the River' to screen at Peninsula College tonight
Peninsula College's Magic of Cinema series will open its fall-quarter programming tonight with “Return of the River,” a film about the restoration of the Elwha River. The 7 p.m. screening in the Maier Performance Hall on the Port Angeles campus at 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd. will be immediately followed by a question-and-answer session with the film's two co-directors, John Gussman of Sequim and Jessica Plumb of Port Townsend. General admission is $5; it is free with a student ID. (Peninsula Daily News)

Protected zone for orcas? Find out about it at The Whale Trail’s upcoming Orca Talk
The Whale Trail brings Bruce Stedman of Orca Relief to C&P Coffee Company in West Seattle to discuss a proposal for “A Protected Zone for Puget Sound Orcas,” 7 pm Thursday, October 30th. $5 suggested donation, kids free. Tickets at Brown Paper Tickets (West Seattle Blog)

Now, your thank-goodness-for-tug-weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT WED OCT 22 2014
GALE WARNING IN EFFECT UNTIL 8 AM PDT THIS MORNING
 SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS IN EFFECT FROM 8 AM PDT THIS MORNING THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
TODAY
SW WIND 15 TO 25 KT...BECOMING S 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT...SUBSIDING TO 2 FT OR LESS IN THE
 AFTERNOON. W SWELL 12 FT AT 14 SECONDS. RAIN.
TONIGHT
S WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 9 FT AT 13 SECONDS. RAIN.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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