Wednesday, January 22, 2014

1/22 Oil trains, geoducks, salmon, West Bay spill, Vic sewage, beer cruise, fishery survey, blower ban, bee killer

Infographic by protectwhatcom.org
Power plant engine tumbles off truck into Port Westward oil tanker  
A large engine for a new power plant under construction near Clatskanie fell off a truck Tuesday morning and struck a fully loaded railroad crude oil tanker, but no oil was spilled, several sources said. No injuries were reported. The incident took place around 8 a.m. at the construction site of a new Portland General Electric power plant at Port Westward. The engine was one of 12 German-built units that were shipped to the Port of Longview and then barged downstream to a staging area at the construction site during the last two weeks, PGE spokeswoman Brianne Hyder said. Crews were moving one of the engines on a flat-bed trailer when it fell off and crashed into the crude oil tanker parked on an adjacent railroad track, Hyder said. The tanker was not badly damaged and no oil was spilled. The tankers hold 28,000 gallons of oil when fully loaded. Andre Stepankowsky  reports.

Empower oil transport safety as rail traffic grows
As oil shipments soar across the United States, a bill in the state Legislature would provide communities with basic oil traffic information. Lance Dickey opines.

Do Something: Environmental Priorities Coalition
The Environmental Priorities Coalition proposes this Washington legislative session two straightforward, commonsense opportunities for progress: closing a tax loophole that benefits Big Oil and the Oil Transportation Safety Act, which will protect our communities from the increasing threat of oil spills. Stand up, speak out.

Chinese ban on shellfish still hurting Washington economy
A Chinese ban on U.S. shellfish imports has hit Washington state shellfish growers, and so far, there’s no end in sight. Since a ban was imposed on shellfish imports from the West Coast in December, Washington state has lost $976,000 in revenue, said Matthew Randazzo, senior advisor to the Commissioner of Public Lands... Since the Department of Health was alerted of the shellfish ban in early December, Washington state shellfish growers have been missing out on thousands of dollars of revenue. Washington geoducks account for half of the worldwide market. The ban comes at a critical point in the shellfish harvest calendar. The Chinese New Year occurs on January 31, and Washington growers heavily depend on the revenue from shellfish sales during this time. Annaliese Davis reports.

If you like to listen: Before Salmon Was King, Before Salmon Was Greed
KUOW begins a series called “Sacred Catch.” It explores the fishing rights of Native Americans in Washington state. Producer Jeff Emtman went to Bellingham to visit members of the Lummi Tribe to find out the role fishing plays in their way of life.

Fishmonger's Tests Prove There's No Need To Worry About Radiation In Pacific Salmon
Scientists have said it's safe to eat fish caught in the Pacific Ocean in the wake of Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, but rumors continue to circulate on the Internet.  To quell these false claims and put consumers at ease, a Seattle fish company has conducted independent tests to prove Pacific salmon is safe for consumption. Pete Knutson is a co-owner and founder of Loki Fish Company. He and his son sell their wild-caught Alaskan salmon directly to consumers at farmers markets in Seattle. Bellamy Pailthorp reports.

Department of Ecology investigates oil and soap spill at West Bay Marina
The Department of Ecology is investigating an oil spill in Olympia's West Bay Marina. An extensive oil sheen and strong diesel fuel odors were reported late Sunday at the marina, 2100 West Bay Drive. The department estimates the spill's volume between 20 and 50 gallons of oil. As of Tuesday afternoon, the department had not yet located the source of the spill. Andy Hobbs reports.

Better communication needed on sewage plans, Esquimalt mayor says  
Sewage is a regional concern and the Capital Regional District needs to do a better job of keeping everyone up to speed on its plans, Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins said Tuesday. She made the comment following a marathon meeting Monday during which Esquimalt council gave second reading to a revised rezoning application for McLoughlin Point, where the CRD plans to build a regional wastewater treatment plant.  Sandra McCulloch reports.

Whales and ales? Line touts 'beer cruise' from Seattle
Small ship adventure line Un-Cruise Adventures is hoping to tap the craft beer movement with a new beer-themed voyage out of Seattle. The one-week sailing on the 60-passenger Wilderness Adventurer will kick off on May 3 and combine an adventurous exploration of Washington's whale-filled Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands with nightly beer tastings with experts on the Seattle beer scene. Gene Sloan reports.

Survey for Puget Sound fisheries offers prize
The public is invited to take an online survey regarding a state Department of Fish and Wildlife program for Puget Sound fisheries — and enter to win a fishing rod and reel. The survey will be available through March 31, and anyone 13 or older is encouraged to participate. The winner of the drawing will be announced in April. The survey is intended to gauge public understanding of the agency’s Puget Sound Recreational Salmon and Marine Fish Enhancement Program. The survey can be accessed at wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/salmon/psrfef/survey.html.

Sen. Ranker wants to replace state agencies' leaf-blowers with brooms, rakes
State Sen. Kevin Ranker introduced a bill Tuesday to bar Washington state agencies from using gasoline-powered leaf blowers, saying they are noisy and emit greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. The Democrat from Orcas Island said the state “needs to lead” with policies that are in line with state goals on climate change. “These things are noisy and they also release significant greenhouse gases,” Ranker said. Brad Shannon reports.

Study: Mutating virus may be killing honeybees
A rapidly mutating virus has leapt from plants to honeybees, where it is reproducing and contributing to the collapse of colonies vital to the multibillion-dollar agricultural industry, according to a new study. Michael Wines reports.

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST WED JAN 22 2014
TODAY
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 9 FT AT 14 SECONDS. SLIGHT CHANCE OF DRIZZLE THIS MORNING.
TONIGHT
E WIND 5 TO 15 KT...RISING TO 10 TO 20 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 8 FT AT 13 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG AFTER
 MIDNIGHT.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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