Thursday, December 26, 2013

12/26 Eagles, steelhead, Bangor dock, NZ snails, Xmas wraps, development rights, pollock, toxic algae

Brackendale eagles (CBC News)
High hopes for Brackendale bald eagles
The bald eagle population in Brackendale near Squamish, B.C., has been dwindling recently, but some are hoping this will be a banner year for the annual count.  Many attribute the diminishing population to shrinking salmon runs. But with a few strong salmon runs this year, eagle watchers hope to see the birds return. Tim Weekes reports.

Why You Won’t See Wild Steelhead On Many Plates This Season
It’s prime time for wild steelhead, but you likely won’t see it on a plate, not even at the Steelhead Diner in Seattle’s Pike Place Market. “I don’t kill wild steelhead. I don’t eat them and I don’t serve them at my restaurant, and I never have,” said Kevin Davis, the restaurant’s chef who likes the Washington state fish so much that he named his first restaurant after it. Many share Davis’ passion for the steelhead, which is a type of rainbow trout. Some restaurants and most vendors in Pike Place Market have informally banned selling or serving wild steelhead. Bellamy Pailthorp reports.

Navy maneuver on Bangor wharf’s safety is key to lawsuit
A U.S. District Court judge in Tacoma is preparing to rule on a lawsuit by anti-nuclear activists that the Navy withheld crucial information on safety hazards posed by a new explosives-handling wharf at Naval Base Kitsap Bangor. Kyung M. Song reports.

Cold estimated to have killed half of snails in Capitol Lake
The heavy cold snap earlier in December proved to be a big help to state officials trying to limit an unwelcome New Zealand mudsnail population that has infested Olympia’s Capitol Lake. Officials lowered the lake during a weeklong subfreezing spell that saw temperatures fall into the teens five nights during the Dec. 4-9 period, and state scientists estimated that 40 percent to 60 percent of the tiny rice-sized snails were killed lakewide. In a summary report on the drawdown experiment, the state Department of Enterprise Services called it “the most effective treatment of New Zealand mudsnails since the pest was first found there in 2009.” Brad Shannon reports.

For Recyclers, Holiday Gift Wrap Is A Mine Field Of ‘Contaminants’
The same shiny gift wrap and bright bows that make Christmas presents so enticing are exactly what give recycling centers headaches the day after Christmas. At the Kootenai County Solid Waste Department in north Idaho, the day after Christmas has two distinctions. It’s one of the busiest days of the year by volume. And one of the lightest days by weight. Jessica Robinson reports.

County plans new transfer of development rights program  
Skagit County could soon see more natural resource lands conserved if a program to relocate growth from such lands to more urban areas is implemented. The county is studying a market-based transfer of development rights program, which would allow individuals to purchase development rights on natural resource lands in exchange for development incentives in areas where growth better fits. A developer would be able to buy a development right from a county-designated “sending area,” which would most likely be made up of forest lands, ag lands, timber lands and scenic lands. A conservation easement would then be placed on the natural resource land, meaning it would be preserved and could never be developed. The developer who purchased the right could then use it in a designated “receiving area,” where growth is desirable, for a building incentive, often to build to a higher density. Rachel Lerman reports.

The Story Behind Pollock Fishing, The Northwest's Other Big Catch
Pollock — it’s not something you put on your grocery list or order at a restaurant. But you’ve probably eaten a lot of pollock, which makes up the largest fishery for human consumption. Fake crabmeat in sushi rolls, McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish Sandwich and Burger King’s Premium Alaskan Fish Sandwich are all made up of pollock. And the same goes for just about every fish stick. Jennifer Wing reports.

Potentially toxic algae bloom reported in Elk/Beaver Lake park
Visitors to Elk and Beaver lakes are warned to beware of a seasonal slime that can be poisonous. Blue-green algae blooms have been detected at the Brookleigh boat launch in Elk/Beaver Lake Regional Park, according to the Capital Regional District... Blue-green algae produce a variety of toxins that may attack the liver and nervous system or simply irritate the skin. However, scientists estimate that between 30 to 50 per cent of blooms are harmless... The warning is in effect until Jan. 2, but may be extended if the algae is still present, said CRD spokeswoman Danielle Desharnais.

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST THU DEC 26 2013
TODAY
SE WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 6 FT AT 18 SECONDS. SLIGHT CHANCE OF RAIN.
TONIGHT
SE WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 7 FT AT 17 SECONDS. SLIGHT CHANCE OF RAIN.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter.

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

No comments:

Post a Comment