Tuesday, December 17, 2013

12/17 Geoduck ban, coal delivery, BC LNG, net pens, sewage sludge, steelhead, soap rules

Southern resident killer whales sleeping (Meg McDonald)
If you like to watch: Meg McDonald shares her video shot off Vashon on Dec. 14 of Southern Resident Killer Whales: Sleeping in the Salish Sea (HD)

China’s shellfish ban hits Skagit County
Many West Coast shellfish farms, commercial harvesters and tribes are reeling since China banned imports of mollusk shellfish from Washington, Oregon, Alaska and Northern California in the first week of December.... Taylor Shellfish spokesman Bill Dewey said the ban will hurt his company’s sales of geoduck the most. Taylor is the nation’s largest seller of farmed shellfish. Dewey said his company has regularly shipped 40,000 to 50,000 pounds of geoduck to China per month, representing half of the market for the product. Mark Stayton and Kimbery Cauvel report.

Santa-garbed protesters try to deliver coal to Port Metro Vancouver
Depending on your perspective, either the downtown offices of Port Metro Vancouver were invaded Monday morning by “masked protesters carrying bags containing an unknown substance” or six Santas who tried to deliver bags of coal to port officials and got thrown out. According to a statement from Port Metro, the protesters “illegally gained entrance to Port Metro Vancouver’s offices and attempted to access the Operations Centre, a Transport Canada restricted area. A number of our employees were physically assaulted and property was damaged during this aggressive act.”

NEB approves four more LNG export licences in B.C., but await Ottawa's blessing
Four more proposed liquefied natural gas projects in British Columbia have received approvals for export licences from the National Energy Board, but the federal cabinet still needs to give its blessing. The NEB has approved the applications from three major proponents seeking to build terminals in northwestern British Columbia: BG Group’s Prince Rupert LNG Exports Ltd., the Petronas-led Pacific NorthWest LNG Ltd. and Exxon Mobil Corp.’s West Coast Canada LNG Ltd.... The NEB has now granted export licences for seven fledgling B.C. LNG projects and is reviewing applications from another four. None of the approved projects, however, are in the terminal construction stage because the proponents say they first need to learn details of the B.C. government’s plans for taxation of the LNG industry and internal assessments still must be conducted on the economics of proceeding. Brent Jang and Kelly Cryderman report.

Net pen issue blocks Jefferson County’s shoreline plan no more; commissioners give OK after 3 years of debate
Jefferson County commissioners approved a new Shoreline Master Plan on Monday, finishing a process that began nearly three years ago.  The approval, though unanimous, came with some qualifications. Commissioner Phil Johnson said he still disagrees with one aspect of the plan requiring the allowance of net pens for the farming of fish just offshore.  “It’s good to see that the state is paying a little more attention to this issue,” Johnson said. “I am still concerned with net pens, but we can amend this any time we want.” Charlie Bermant reports.

Sewage sludge plant bidding opens
The messy business of handling the sludge left over from Greater Victoria’s proposed sewage treatment system is now open to bidders. The civilian commission in charge of building the $783-million sewage project has started the tendering process for a biosolids sludge centre at Hartland Landfill, as well as a separate contract to dispose of the sludge. Companies can submit bids, including alternate locations, until March 14, 2014. Four bidders will be shortlisted to make final pitches in May, according to the Seaterra commission. Rob Shaw reports.

If you like to listen: Five Things You Should Know About The Art of Steelhead Fishing
We put the text link up in yesterday's posting but reporter Bellamy Pailthorp says you really have to listen to the interview of author Sean Gallagher. Nice photos, too.

FDA seeks tougher rules on antibacterial soaps
The Food and Drug Administration says there is no evidence that antibacterial chemicals used in liquid soaps and washes help prevent the spread of germs, and there is some evidence they may pose health risks. The agency said it is revisiting the safety of chemicals like triclosan in light of recent studies suggesting they can interfere with hormone levels and spur the growth of drug-resistant bacteria. The government's preliminary ruling lends new credence to longstanding warnings from researchers who say the chemicals are, at best, ineffective and at worst, a threat to public health. Matthew Perrone reports.

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST TUE DEC 17 2013
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 6 AM PST THIS MORNING THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
TODAY
E WIND 5 TO 15 KT...BECOMING SE AND RISING TO 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 2 FT BUILDING TO 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 12
 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN THIS MORNING...THEN RAIN LIKELY IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 7 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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