Wednesday, December 11, 2013

12/11 Geoduck farming, BC pipe, oil terminal study, fish library, dredge spoils, Drayton poop, Delta farms

Geoduck farm, Hartstine Island/Wikimedia
Study assesses viability of geoduck in aquaculture
Washington Sea Grant, a federally funded marine research and education organization based at the University of Washington, has completed a study of the unusual, long-necked geoduck clam. The report released Dec. 2 culminates six years of scientific studies. It assesses how geoduck commercial harvest operations, like Taylor Shellfish Farms in Samish Bay, might affect marine environments in Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It also recommends future research to support a sustainable geoduck industry in the Pacific Northwest.... Read the full report at wsg.washington.edu/research/geoduck. Kimberly Cauvel reports.

NEB won’t revisit releasing Northern Gateway decision in Calgary
The National Energy Board says releasing its decisions in Calgary is standard practice regardless of where in Canada the project is located, and it will not make an exception for its report on the controversial $6.5-billion Northern Gateway pipeline proposal. The board says it is considering whether to give reporters and interested stakeholders an embargoed look at the decision on whether to approve the project a few hours early in a lock-up in Calgary, which would be the first time the agency has ever done such a thing... After 180 days of hearings in 21 locations across British Columbia and Alberta, the board is to release its decision by the end of this month. Ian Bailey reports.

Vancouver (WA) asks for thorough oil-terminal study
Vancouver neighborhoods cut off from fire and police protection by increased train traffic. A highly volatile commodity traveling near homes. An industrial area prone to liquefying in an earthquake. Those are among more than 100 areas of concern the city of Vancouver wants state regulators to include in their examination of the environmental impacts of a proposed oil-by-rail operation at the Port of Vancouver. Aaron Corvin reports.

Dismantling of Fishery Library 'Like a Book Burning,' Say Scientists
The Harper government has dismantled one of the world's top aquatic and fishery libraries as part of its agenda to reduce government as well as limit the role of environmental science in policy decision-making. Last week the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, which is closing five of its seven libraries, allowed scientists, consultants and members of the public to scavenge through what remained of Eric Marshall Library belonging to the Freshwater Institute at the University of Manitoba. Andrew Nikiforuk reports.

Homeowners at Odds with Govt Agencies over Dredging, Disposal
Some residents in the Olympia area are concerned about dredged materials being disposed of in the Puget Sound. They say the Department of Natural Resources is failing to protect underwater ecology at the same time that state and federal governments are spending millions on cleanup. Bob Lyden is a resident of the area near Anderson Island and a member of the U.S. Coast Guard. He's also part of a group of locals pushing to stop the state from putting dredged materials into a sanctioned dumping site. The group is concerned for local wildlife, including Dall's porpoise and Dungeness crab. Bellamy Pailthorp reports.

Investigators use dye and a grapefruit to track bacteria in harbor
State health and environmental investigators are trying to track down the flow of dangerous fecal coliform bacteria into Drayton Harbor. The harbor is home to a flourishing shellfish industry that has to shut down during the winter rainy season because so much bacterial flows in. Dakota Creek is one source so on Tuesday the team poured a harmless red dye into the creek to see how it flows into the damaged shellfish beds. They also tossed in flagged grapefruit to help find the dye as it dissipates and gets harder to see. The grapefruit will float for days. Gary Chittim reports.

Developer targets farmland near Delta terminal
A Vancouver industrial real estate firm has extended options to buy nearly 250 hectares of farmland near Deltaport, a container terminal with ambitious expansion plans. Developer Ron Emerson envisions an intermodal rail yard and industrial facilities for packing, unpacking and distributing goods arriving at the port.

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 230 AM PST WED DEC 11 2013
TODAY
E WIND 15 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 2 OR 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
E WIND 15 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 2 OR 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 11 SECONDS.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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