Friday, June 28, 2013

6/28 State budget, oil terminal, BC pipe, Skagit floods, Smith Is., Oly Park, sixgill, Stanley Park, sea study, Steve Sulkin

New blog: “I grew up in Hawaii with no idea what I was singing about when rumbling along with Tennessee Ernie Ford in my deepest pre-teen bass voice to the lyrics of Sixteen Tons...” Coal: “I Owe My Soul To The Company Store”

Right on time for July-- Cliff Mass writes: "The past several days has brought strong showers, lightning, and occasional gusty winds.  But that inclement weather will soon be a memory as a major ridge develops over the western U.S.  Temperatures will climb into the 80s west of the Cascades, with highs reaching into the lower 100's early next week over portions of eastern Washington." Major Warm Up Ahead  

One-hundred and fifty days of contentious budget negotiations — and the threat of a government shutdown — ended Thursday morning with a handshake.... In the end, negotiators agreed on a $33.6 billion, two-year state budget that would put an additional $1 billion into public schools and ensure state offices will remain open Monday.The package represents a roughly $2.5 billion increase in spending over the current $31.1 billion budget that expires at midnight Sunday. Andrew Garber reports. $33.6B budget gets tentative OK; gives $1B boost to schools  

Oil refiner Tesoro and a terminal operating company named Savage detailed plans Thursday for the biggest crude oil shipping terminal to be proposed in the Northwest.   The proposed terminal, which would be located on the Columbia River at the Port of Vancouver in Washington, would receive crude by rail from oil fields in North Dakota and the like. The oil would then be transferred onto oceangoing tankers for delivery to West Coast refineries. Tom Banse reports. Proposed rail-to-ship crude oil terminal biggest yet in region   Also see: What You Can Do About Oil-By-Rail in the Northwest

A B.C. First Nations group says it will not support Premier Christy Clark’s liquefied natural gas strategy unless the province withholds drilling permits for the proposed $6.5-billion Northern Gateway oil pipeline. Enbridge has applied for provincial permits in 32 locations in northern B.C. along the proposed oil pipeline route to carry out work this summer meant to provide more information about below-ground conditions. Gordon Hoekstra reports. First Nations group calls for B.C. to reject Northern Gateway pipeline work permits

The area’s congressional delegation has secured nearly $300,000 to allow work to continue on a Skagit River flood protection study through October. This will allow work on the Skagit River General Investigation Study to continue at a pace that could see a final report in about two years... The money will go to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. But first, officials will unveil the top choice for protecting residents and property from a 100-year flood. Such a flood has a 1 in 100 chance of happening in a given year. The Skagit River GI Study has continued for more than a decade and cost more than $11 million in local and federal money. Such studies are not supposed to take this long or cost this much; the Skagit River’s is of the longest running studies in the country. Money secured to fund flood study

Snohomish County on Tuesday withdrew the final environmental study issued earlier this month for an $18 million project to restore salmon habitat on Smith Island. The county made the decision after deciding the June 10 environmental impact statement would benefit from more technical details, surface water management director Debbie Terwilleger said. The county plans to reissue the study next month when it seeks its first major permit required to construct the project. The county withdrew the study after the local diking district and the county Farm Bureau appealed it.  County seeks more study of Smith Island salmon project

The North Olympic Peninsula's national park is celebrating its diamond anniversary this weekend. And those who oversee Olympic National Park agree that it looks pretty good for its age. “Seventy-five is the new 40,” National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis said Wednesday.... As the park, signed into existence June 29, 1938, by President Franklin D. Roose-velt, steps into its next 75 years, Jarvis and Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum agreed that two of the biggest challenges it faces is climate change and keeping the national park relevant for younger generations. Jeremy Schwartz reports. Olympic National Park diamond jubilee: Looking ahead to next 75 years  

The (Friday Harbor) Labs biological preserve at San Juan Island's Argyle Lagoon became a makeshift laboratory Wednesday afternoon, June 26, after a call came in that a 12-foot-long sixgill shark had washed up on the beach. Students and instructors bundled up a batch of scientific equipment and exited the marine facility en masse, according to biologist Adam Summers, a shark specialist and associate director of the Labs comparative biomechanics department. Scott Rasmussen reports. Stranded sixgill offers 'rare' look at predator from the deep  

Four years after the project began, volunteers have finally finished combing through Stanley Park, stripping 8,000 trees, shrubs and stumps of English ivy. While the invasive species is not poisonous, it chokes out branches of native species and when it reaches a certain height, it flowers and spreads... More than 1,000 people have volunteered their time in the last year alone to fight invasive species in Stanley Park... Park Board Commissioner Aaron Jasper says the four-year project is the result of a culmination of partnerships that began after a devastating windstorm struck the park in December 2006.  Volunteers clear Stanley Park of invasive English ivy  

The University of Washington research ship Tommy Thompson sits a the end of Pier 91 and is getting ready to sail in a few days. On board are most of the 570 miles of fiber optic cable that will turn the ocean floor off the northwest coast into a research paradise, and not just for scientists. The public will also be able to watch high definition video of hot volcanic vents and unusual sea life in real time starting in 2015. The public may even be invited to help with research. The project is called the Ocean Observatories Initiative. It's the larger of two such observatories, with one operating off the coast of British Columbia, Canada. Glen Farley reports. UW takes major step in establishing ocean observatory

For 28 years, Steve Sulkin has guided Shannon Point Marine Center as it added new facilities and programs and welcomed more and more students and others from around the country taking advantage of its research facilities. Sulkin, who came to the Western Washington University facility in the West End in 1985 as its first full-time director, will retire at the end of August. Joan Pringle reports. Sulkin to retire from Shannon Point center

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 251 AM PDT FRI JUN 28 2013
TODAY
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 10 SECONDS. PATCHY FOG THIS MORNING.
TONIGHT
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 15 SECONDS.
SAT
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING W TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 14 SECONDS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 14 SECONDS.
SUN
W WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING NW 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 14 SECONDS.
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1 comment:

  1. Quite a pithy collection of news items there. Shannon Point Marine Center is certainly an outstanding facility that mostly flies way under the radar!

    I think we will probably get the 100 year flood (I predict around Thanksgiving time this year) well before the Skagit Study is done. What a prime example of passing around a hot potato until the s*** hits the fan.

    ReplyDelete