Wednesday, June 5, 2013

6/5 Sediment woes, BC coal, marbled murrelets, hogweed, 'Fecal Matters,' yacht toxins, shore plans

Beware the BC Hogweed (Invasive Plant Council of BC)
There is an expanding health problem on the bottom of Puget Sound. Washington Department of Ecology scientists said when they compared sediment samples collected this year with those taken 10 years ago, they found that the sediment health is getting worse. Working off the back of a research vessel near Magnolia Bluff, the team lowered a clam shell scoop which returned to the surface with a sample of the top three inches of sediment. The sandy muck was packed with creatures, but the scientists say there should be more. The numbers of tiny clams, worms and other bottom dwellers are declining and the scientists say that is a sure sign of declining health. Gary Chittim reports. Scientists say Puget Sound sediment is suffering

A controversial proposal to build a coal terminal in Surrey was top of mind for many of the speakers at Port Metro Vancouver's annual general meeting yesterday. Around 20 people lined up to speak at the meeting, many of whom had questions about the proposed coal terminal at Fraser Surrey Docks. The proposed transfer station, which would be built to handle up to 4 million metric tonnes of coal, has some worried about health concerns connected to coal dust. Coal would be loaded onto barges on the Fraser River and towed to ships waiting on Texada Island, then loaded onto freighters travelling to Asia. Speakers question coal terminal expansion at port meeting  

Small and shy, marbled murrelets nonetheless are at the center of a big battle that could determine the fate of state-managed timberlands across large swaths of rural Western Washington. Marbled murrelets were listed as a threatened species in 1992 — yet the birds have declined ever since. And even though logging poses the greatest threat to their survival, the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has yet to create a long-term conservation strategy for murrelets on state timberlands. At issue is how to balance the need to save a struggling species with the state’s mandate to generate logging revenue from state timberlands. Public hearings get under way this week that are intended to help set the direction for management alternatives to be considered in another process beginning later this year. Lynda Mapes reports. Secretive birds at center of ‘big collision’ between habitat, logging  

Plant experts are warning people in the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island to stay away from the giant hogweed, a dangerous and invasive plant that is just starting to bloom. Coming into contact with giant hogweed sap can cause severe blistering, large welts and burns. Invasive giant hogweed starting to bloom in B.C.  

If you ever wondered what that smell was, the state has a blog for that.... One of the state’s most up-to-date blogs is kept by the Department of Ecology and few topics get updated more frequently than its “Fecal Matters” section  alerting residents to where and why it might not be safe to go for a swim. “Fecal Matters” updates are provided by the state Beach Environmental Assessment, Communication and Health Program.  Mike Faulk reports. State blog keeps residents up to date on ‘Fecal Matters’

In April of last year, New World Yacht Builders was fined $48,000 by the state Department of Ecology for violating a list of state and federal laws regarding disposal of hazardous materials. No materials were actually spilled, but a July 2011 inspection of company facilities on 34th Street found four 55-gallon barrels of used acetone and another barrel of acetone-soaked rags that had not been disposed of within a 90-day window and had been left unreported to Ecology. Subsequent inspections found the company corrected some infractions while others emerged. Now, after implementing policies to correct prior lapses, the company has found a way to pay off its fines and at the same time help some members of its community. Mark Stayton reports. Toxic rags to educational riches

The Olympia City Council, at a special meeting Tuesday, postponed the next public hearing on the city’s state-mandated shoreline development plan to July 9. Though no formal vote was taken, council members agreed to move the date, which had been set for June 18. The council also agreed to hold two information sessions on the plan, tentatively set for June 19 and 20. Members of the public are asked to submit questions they’d like answered at the information sessions by June 14. Tuesday’s delay was the latest of many for the Shoreline Master Program, which has been discussed for more than three years and was originally scheduled to be adopted in 2010. The plan got bogged down in the city’s Planning Commission, which asked for more time. Last June, a sharply divided commission submitted its draft plan. Matt Batcheldor reports. Olympia council postpones hearing on shoreline plan

Jefferson County is one step closer to approving an updated shoreline management program after several tweaks were made to its fin-fish aquaculture policy. But this may not be enough to earn the support of the county commissioner who has led the opposition to fish farming. “I’m still very uncomfortable with net pens,” Phil Johnson said.... The state Department of Ecology has said that counties lack the authority to ban the industry outright, which commissioners sought to do. The county’s shoreline program update was sent to the state in November 2010.  Ecology approved most of it in February 2011, except for a proposed ban on fin-fish aquaculture, which raises non-native species, such as Atlantic salmon, in pens. Since then, the commissioners have worked toward developing a conditional-use process that limits the location and scope of potential net-pen businesses. Charlie Bermant reports. Jefferson County finalizing its net-pen policy

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 730 AM PDT WED JUN 5 2013...UPDATED
TODAY
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 10 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG THIS MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 10 SECONDS.

--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter.

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

No comments:

Post a Comment