Thursday, June 20, 2013

6/20 Kayaking Shaw, beach seining, right whale, gray whale, humpbacks, Mercer Is shore rules

PHOTO: Pacific Northwest Seasons
Jill in Pacific Northwest Seasons writes: "Northwest, we're fortunate to have such a sea kayaker's paradise in the San Juan Islands.  I've kayaked and camped many times in this scenic archipelago over the years, but this is my first time camping on and circumnavigating Shaw Island.  It doesn't disappoint..." Kayaking the San Juans: Shaw Island Circumnavigation

If you like to watch: Volunteers and staff from Shannon Point Marine Center collect marine life from the tidal area east of the Anacortes state ferry terminal. Photos by Scott Terrill. Beach Seine

Fisheries and Oceans Canada says biologists have spotted a rare, endangered whale in British Columbia waters for the first time in more than 60 years. North Pacific right whales were once abundant between B.C. and the Bering Sea before they were hunted to near extinction before the 20th century. They are now listed as endangered in Canada and scientists believe only a few hundred may remain alive, mainly in the western north Pacific. Rare North Pacific right whale spotted off coast of Haida Gwaii  

A gray whale that generated the concern of onlookers on shore successfully made its way Wednesday out of the shallow waters of Burley Lagoon, near Purdy, Pierce County. Although a whale expert says the animal was probably never trapped in the lagoon, as some observers feared, the juvenile whale, perhaps about 25 feet long, does appear to be emaciated and may be injured. John Calambokidis of Cascadia Research said it’s not unusual to see gray whales in Puget Sound and off Whidbey Island in the spring and summer, but seldom would they make it to Burley Lagoon — west of Highway 16 north of Gig Harbor — one of the farthest reaches of Puget Sound waters. Jack Broom reports. Young whale’s close call in Puget Sound  

Posters are going up at Vancouver Island marinas in areas where humpbacks have been spotted in an effort to avoid whale-boat collisions. Information sheets, put together by Cetus Research and Conservation, the Northern Island Marine Mammal Stewardship Association and the Marine Education and Research Society, warn boaters to look out for signs that humpbacks are in the area. Judith Lavoie reports. Watch out for humpbacks, whale groups warn boaters

Waterfront homeowners on Mercer Island planning to build homes, patios, docks — or major additions to them — should be prepared to do landscaping as well. The City Council, tightening proposed shoreline rules, has decided to require homeowners to create a 20-foot-wide buffer extending the width of the property, at least half of it covered with native plants, when redeveloping their property. That’s a significant change from an earlier version of the city’s shoreline master program update, which would have required landscaping on only 25 percent of the lakeside buffer. The earlier approach was rejected by the state Department of Ecology as failing to adequately protect Lake Washington and habitat along the water’s edge. Keith Ervin reports. Mercer Island to require more native plants in shoreline plan  

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT THU JUN 20 2013
TODAY
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 7 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN THIS MORNING...THEN RAIN IN THE
 AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W WIND 15 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 7 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter.

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

No comments:

Post a Comment