Wednesday, May 8, 2013

5/8 BC LNG, spill readiness, Seattle seawall, Dan Jaffe, estuaries value, Migratory Bird Day, bee deaths, doing more with less

(Pipeline Observer)
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The BG Group has filed plans for a liquefied natural gas plant at Prince Rupert that would consume the equivalent to all of the province’s current production of natural gas and almost all the energy generated by BC Hydro’s proposed Site C dam to produce it. The scope of the plant and its impacts are laid out in a project description filed this week with the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency. The document provides an indication of the potential and challenges that LNG development holds for the province. Gordon Hamilton reports. BG Group takes ‘first step’ in building massive Prince Rupert LNG plant

The Washington Department of Ecology has given its final approval of the Washington State Maritime Cooperative’s (WSMC) umbrella oil spill readiness plan that covers more than 1,600 commercial vessels that transit Puget Sound and Grays Harbor. WSMC’s oil spill readiness – or contingency – plan helps ensure that large commercial vessels can mount a rapid, aggressive and well coordinated response if they spill oil in state waters. The plan identifies the location of different response equipment such as oil containment boom, skimming and towing vessels and vacuum trucks in Puget Sound and Grays Harbor. It also identifies how the equipment will be mobilized by private response entities during a spill to minimize harm to important environmental, cultural and economic resources. Dave Haviland reports. Oil Spill Response Plan Covering 1,600 Vessels Approved for Puget Sound and Grays Harbor  

Businesses on Seattle’s historic waterfront piers are challenging the final environmental assessment of the planned $335 million seawall project, saying the city isn’t doing enough to ensure they will survive four years of construction. The Seattle Historic Waterfront Association filed a legal appeal, saying the environmental review for the seawall project wasn’t adequate and the city shouldn’t have issued construction permits. The appeal, filed last week, says the city hasn’t provided any specific plans to address the potential loss of visitors, parking along the waterfront or disruption from rerouted traffic and construction. The appeal says the city hasn’t even secured permission from the pier owners for seawall work, which will require access to the piers. Lynn Thompson reports. Pier merchants appeal seawall project’s environmental review  

Dan Jaffe says he didn’t set out intending to go all rogue with his science.... But he says something felt blocked in the pipeline when he sent out a proposal to study part of the biggest environmental controversy in the Northwest since the spotted owl: the coal trains. Danny Westneat reports. Coal trains fire up UW chemist  

Restore America's Estuaries and the American Sportfishing Association this week released a report co-authored with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration detailing how restoring our nation's coastlines and estuaries leads to healthy habitat and strong fisheries, which has a positive impact on both recreational and commercial businesses and industries. Check out "More Habitat Means More Fish"

International Migratory Bird Day is Saturday and the Pilchuck Audubon Society is planning a host of events throughout Snohomish County. All events are free and families are welcome. Created in 1993, International Migratory Bird Day focuses on one of the most important and spectacular events in the life of a migratory bird -- the journey between summer and winter homes. It is celebrated all over the United States and Canada, Mexico and Central America through bird festivals, bird walks and education programs. Jim Davis reports. Check out migratory birds on Saturday  

According to a new survey of America's beekeepers, almost a third of the country's honeybee colonies did not make it through the winter. That's been the case, in fact, almost every year since the U.S. Department of Agriculture began this annual survey, six years ago. Over the past six years, on average, 30 percent of all the honeybee colonies in the U.S. died off over the winter. The worst year was five years ago. Last year was the best: Just 22 percent of the colonies died....But this year, the death rate was up again: 31 percent. Dan Charles reports. Bee deaths may have reached a crisis point for crops  

On an increasingly crowded, hot and hungry planet, the earth’s capacity to meet population demand for natural resources is severely strained. The future of wildlife and biodiversity is at a tipping point. World Wildlife Fund Chief Scientist Jon Hoekstra says we need to make more with less. Martha Baskin reports. Hot and Hungry Planet: World Wildlife Fund Urges Humans to Make More With Less

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT WED MAY 8 2013
TODAY
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT BECOMING NW 10 TO 20 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG THIS MORNING. PATCHY DRIZZLE THIS MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND 15 TO 25 KT EASING TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT SUBSIDING TO 1 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 12 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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