Friday, May 10, 2013

5/10 Pebble Mine, orca tracks, oil tax loophole, oil trains, BC LNG, Stanley Park, Manchester shores, caterpillars

Celebrating Mother's Day with Gaia
Though it’s thousands of miles away, a proposed mine for gold and copper in Alaska’s Bristol Bay threatens to destroy the livelihood of thousands of people in the Puget Sound area.  Seattle’s fleet of commercial fishermen and seafood processors have been a big part of the opposition to the so-called Pebble Mine. A new economic report puts the value of Bristol Bay’s salmon at $1.5 billion per year, and says more than a quarter of the jobs it generates are located in Washington state. The report comes as a May 31 deadline looms for comments on the EPA’s assessment of the Bristol Bay watershed, a damning scientific document that may determine the future of the Pebble Mine. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. Pebble Mine opponents put value of Bristol Bay fishery at $1.5 billion  

As a continuation of a project began last year, the Northwest Fisheries Science Center began tagging killer whales to help them understand where Southern resident killer whales go in the winter, and thus their winter habitat use. Where the orcas go in winter  

John Williams this week announced launch of his newly improved web site, "The go-to place for media about our Northwest waters." Check it out: Sea-media.org

A UW chemist wanted to do air-quality monitoring on the health effects of coal trains, but couldn’t get the funding. Until he asked you. Danny Westneat follows up with this report. UW chemist’s coal project gets crowdfunded — in record time  

In Washington, oil refineries have long benefited from an accidental tax loophole so bizarre that the state’s bi-partisan tax review committee can identify no public policy purpose for it. With the Supreme Court demanding more money for basic education, both Governor Inslee and the House have moved to close the loophole. Both aim to redirect the $40.8 million from oil companies to classrooms, but some in the Senate are defending the refiners. Eric de Place explains: What Closing Big Oil’s Tax Loophole Could Do For Kids  

Pacific Northwest refineries have been getting crude oil for years from tankers and pipelines. Last September, trains began shipping crude oil into the region by rail. Washington’s emergency responders are learning how to deal with the Northwest’s latest method of transporting crude oil. Crews from the state Department of Ecology spent Wednesday afternoon on the banks of the Columbia River decked out in hazmat suits and respirators. They were practicing how to clean up crude oil spilled from a train. Courtney Flatt reports. How To Clean Up A Crude Oil Spill From Trains  

The Green Party of B.C. says that the expansion of LNG pipelines is “economic suicide” for British Columbia, arguing that the foreign markets both major parties are banking on for LNG exports won’t exist in the next decade. It’s a markedly different position from both the NDP and the Liberals, who support LNG. The Greens say the government must focus on investment in the clean energy sector – an issue that has seldom come up this campaign, which has been dominated by discussions of economic growth through pipelines and the extraction of fossil fuels. Daniel Bitonti reports.  B.C. Greens call expansion of LNG pipelines 'economic suicide' 

It was 125 years ago when city officials had the foresight to ensure 1,000 acres of spectacular real estate bordering Burrard Inlet be saved as a public park. Since its official opening on Sept. 27, 1888, Stanley Park has been a favourite destination for locals, as well as a top tourist destination, attracting more than eight million tourists each year. Canada’s largest urban park has something for everyone. From nearly nine kilometres of paved seawall — shared by pedestrians, joggers and cyclists — to restaurants with outstanding ocean views, Canada’s largest aquarium, a small golf course, a 1,500-seat outdoor summer theatre, an outdoor swimming pool, nine First Nations totem poles, rose and rhododendron gardens and a miniature railway. Vancouver’s Stanley Park named among best in the world as it marks its 125th anniversary

Port of Manchester Commissioner Jim Strode has reached an agreement with the Kitsap County prosecutor on charges he took part in shoreline construction without a permit. The state Department of Fish & Wildlife in December issued a citation against Strode, a longtime port commissioner, for failing to obtain a hydraulic project approval before he and a crew allegedly anchored a log to the beach. In February, Strode was charged with one count of unlawful hydraulic project activities, a criminal misdemeanor. If convicted he would have faced up to a year in jail, a $5,000 fine or both. But Thursday in Kitsap County District Court, Strode entered a “pretrial diversion agreement” that the charges will be dismissed in six months if he pays a $600 fine and meets the court’s conditions. Strode must have no criminal violations during that time, and he personally must refrain from any work on or near the shoreline for the probation period. Chris Henry reports. Manchester Port commissioner will pay fine for unauthorized shoreline work

Wiggling masses of white-orange-and-black caterpillars are emerging from their silken nests to munch on tender leaves - signaling a second spring when Western tent caterpillars might be out in big numbers. "I have seen them out. They're not as bad as last year. What I'm guessing is we're getting a resurgence of a population that peaked last year," said Chris Benedict, agriculture agent at the Washington State University Extension office in Whatcom County. Kie Relyea reports. Western tent caterpillars back en masse this spring  

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT FRI MAY 10 2013
TODAY
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 1 FT AT 16 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT BECOMING S AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 1 FT AT 15 SECONDS.
SAT
SE WIND 5 TO 15 KT BECOMING NW IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 2 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN IN THE AFTERNOON.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT BECOMING E AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 5 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
SUN
S WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 5 FT AT 9 SECONDS.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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