Thursday, June 20, 2024

6/20 Solstice, BC fish farms, uncounted emissions, 'flotel,' chronic wasting disease

Solstice
 

Solstice June 20, 2024, 1:50 p.m. (PDT)
A solstice is the time when the Sun reaches its most northerly or southerly excursion relative to the celestial equator on the celestial sphere. Two solstices occur annually, around June 20–22 and December 20–22. In many countries, the seasons of the year are determined by the solstices and the equinoxes.

Today's top story in Salish Current: Bringing the butterflies home

Ban on open net fish farms in B.C. delayed to 2029
The Canadian federal government says it will ban open net salmon farms in British Columbia starting in 2029 in a plan that will renew more than 60 licences across the province for another five years. Stefan Labbé reports. (Times Colonist)

Canada’s uncounted emissions
As Canada cuts back on emissions at home, how much are its exports contributing to global emissions? The answer comes down to how they are counted. Jaela Bernstien reports. (CBC)

LNG company plans to use ’floatel’ near Squamish without local permit
The company behind a natural gas project near Squamish has withdrawn its application for a local permit to house workers in a converted cruise ship, and is instead pressing ahead on the basis of a provincial order. (Canadian Press)

High Steaks Plate: Chronic Wasting Disease Transmissibility to Humans
Chronic wasting disease is of high concern to hunters, ecologists, and outdoor enthusiasts. An infection can spread through a herd, decimating local populations. It has been spreading throughout North America for decades. Cases have been reported in at least 34 states, including Idaho. Mary Ellen Pitney reports. (NW Public Broadcasting)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  245 AM PDT Thu Jun 20 2024    
TODAY
 E wind 5 to 10 kt, backing to N early this afternoon,  backing to W late. Seas around 3 ft. Wave Detail: W 2 ft at  6 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, becoming SW 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 3 ft at 6 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Wednesday, June 19, 2024

6/19 Dinoflgellate, Bush wheat, North Shore plant, 'war in the woods,' BC LNG pipe, NW Straits, OR beavers, Canada geese, news layoffs

Noctiluca scintillans [Maria Antónia Sampayo]
 

Noctiluca scintillans
Noctiluca scintillans is a marine species of dinoflagellate that can exist in a green or red form, depending on the pigmentation in its vacuoles. It can be found worldwide, but its geographical distribution varies depending on whether it is green or red. This unicellular microorganism is known for its ability to bioluminesce, giving the water a bright blue glow seen at night. However, blooms of this species can be responsible for environmental hazards, such as toxic red tides. They may also be an indicator of anthropogenic eutrophication.(Wikipedia)

Today's top story in Salish Current: Community Voices / Time to rethink our county health board?

New Washington State University spring wheat variety named for Black family with deep roots in Washington
The brand new Bush wheat out of Washington State University is named for the Bush family. You might not have heard of them of until now. Settler George Bush was a Black pioneer on the Oregon Trail. He aided Indigenous populations battling disease, saved fellow settlers during the famine of 1852 and helped develop what’s now the city of Tumwater, a recent Washington State University Insider story said. Anna King reports. (NW Public Broadcasting)

Metro Vancouver launches independent review of $3.86B plant
Metro Vancouver is launching an independent review of the cost of a new wastewater treatment plant that is four years beyond its original completion date and more than five times over budget. The original cost of the North Shore Wastewater Treatment Plant in 2018 was $700 million and it was expected to open in 2020. The estimated cost has since ballooned to $3.86 billion, and the timeline for completion has been extended until 2030. (Canadian Press)

B.C.'s 'war in the woods' grounds to be permanently protected
Old-growth forests that were environmental and Indigenous rights battlegrounds over clearcut logging in the 1980s and 1990s during British Columbia's "war in the woods" are set to receive permanent protections in a land and forest management agreement. The B.C. government says an agreement Tuesday with two Vancouver Island First Nations will protect about 760 square kilometres of Crown land in Clayoquot Sound by establishing 10 new conservancies in areas that include old-growth forests and unique ecosystems. (Canadian Press)

Three things you need to know about B.C.’s newest pipeline for the LNG export industry
Plans are underway for the Nisg̱a’a Nation to buy TC Energy’s 800-kilometre Prince Rupert Gas Transmission LNG pipeline, linking gas from northeast B.C. to the proposed Ksi Lisims LNG facility. Construction is set to start this summer, on Nisg̱a’a lands. Matt Simmons reports. (The Narwhal)

New bill aims to ensure permanent funding for Northwest Straits Commission
Legislation to permanently reauthorize the Northwest Straits Commission in Puget Sound was introduced by U.S. Sen. Patty Murray and U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen on Tuesday, June 18. If passed, the bill would secure the commission’s future and its support of community-led marine and shoreline conservation efforts. Isaac Stone Simonelli reports. (CDN)

No longer considered predators, Oregon beavers get new protections from state
Oregon’s state animal has for years been classified as a “predator” by the state fish and wildlife agency, and that’s meant that the North American Beaver has lived largely unprotected from private landowners who can kill them at will. The beavers will now be classified solely as “furbearers,” an animal whose fur has commercial value, and no longer be classified as “predators.” Alex Baumhardt reports. (Washington State Standard)

‘They Poop Every 12 Minutes’
In the 1970s, Canada geese were imported to the Lower Mainland for hunting and “wildlife viewing.” Unlike the Canada geese that are native to the area, these birds didn’t migrate, but lived in B.C.’s south coast all year long. Today, that population of non-migrating geese is booming, forcing municipalities to find ways to try to control the number of birds and the mess they leave. They’ve been semi-affectionately called “cobra chickens,” with some worrying about their ability to seemingly take over streets and entire neighbourhoods. Jen St. Denis reports. (The Tyee)

Big layoffs at Everett's Herald, Sound Publishing
Carpenter Media Group, a Southern newspaper chain, this week informed a union that it will lay off 62 people at Sound Publishing newspapers in Washington state that it acquired in January. The cuts include more than half the unionized newsroom employees at The Daily Herald of Everett. Brier Dudley writes. (Seattle Times)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  244 AM PDT Wed Jun 19 2024    
TODAY
 E wind 5 to 10 kt, backing to NW late. Seas around 3 ft.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, easing to 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 3 ft at 6 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Tuesday, June 18, 2024

6/18 Coralline algae, BNSF trespass, Molt Blitz, log booms, kelp forests, hunting & fishing fines

Coralline algae
 

 Coralline algae
Coralline algae are widespread in all of the world's oceans, where they often cover close to 100% of rocky substrata. A close look at almost any intertidal rocky shore or coral reef will reveal an abundance of pink to pinkish-grey patches, distributed throughout the rock surfaces. These patches of pink "paint" are actually living crustose coralline red algae. The red algae belong to the division Rhodophyta, within which the coralline algae form the order Corallinales. (Wikipedia)

Today's top story in Salish Current: 'Historic' Samish Nation housing part of effort to build presence on ancestral land

Railroad owes nearly $400M to WA tribe, judge rules
BNSF Railway Co. must pay the Swinomish tribe $394 million for violating the terms of an agreement that allowed the railroad to run trains across a strip of the tribe’s land in northwest Washington, a federal judge ruled Monday.  U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik ruled last year against the railroad for trespassing between 2012 and 2021 as it sent trains carrying crude oil from North Dakota through the Swinomish Reservation, en route to refineries near Anacortes. Determining what amount of money the railroad owed the tribe was left for another phase of the proceedings, which included a bench trial Lasnik oversaw earlier this month. Bill Lucia reports. (Washington State Standard)

Help search for invasive crab during the Salish Sea-wide Molt Blitz
The University of Washington is asking Washingtonians to help create the largest-ever single-day data set of crab molts collected in the state on Thursday. The Salish Sea-wide “Molt Blitz” calls for residents to monitor the shorelines for molts, or the old shells crabs shed when they grow. Collecting and recording these molts provides valuable data for researchers on which species of crab are present in an area, including the invasive European green crab. Vonnair Phair reports. (Seattle Times)

Research finds log booms harmful to B.C. salmon and fish habitats
Studies led by First Nations, conservation groups and UBC point to harm caused by storage of logs on rivers. Akshay Kulkarni reports. (CBC)

UVic researchers aim to regrow kelp forests
A kelp nursery in Bamfield could be growing the next Salish Sea kelp forest. Robyn Bell reports. (Capital Daily)

Fines for illegal hunting and fishing more than double in B.C.
Fines going from $345 to $1,495, up from the current range of $115 to $575, in bid to deter poachers. (Canadian Press)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  310 AM PDT Tue Jun 18 2024    
TODAY
 W wind around 5 kt, veering to NW 10 to 15 kt. Seas 3 to  4 ft. Wave Detail: W 3 ft at 7 seconds and W 2 ft at 11 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, easing to 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas around 3 ft. Wave Detail: NW 2 ft at 6 seconds and  W 2 ft at 10 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Monday, June 17, 2024

6/17 Coral, Grip Rd gravel mine, Dabob Bay, Big One, seafood farming, beloved crows

Lophelia pertusa [Marine Life Info Network]


Cold-water corals
Most people associate corals with tropical waters—like the vibrant corals found in the Indo-Pacific. But you may be surprised to find that a stunning variety of corals live in the chilly waters of the Pacific Northwest. Cold-water corals eat plankton and other small organisms and can be found up to 6,000 feet below the surface. (Seattle Aquarium)

Today's top story in Salish Current: Bellingham port hearing set for issuing bonds for modernization

Hearing examiner again approves Grip Road gravel mine
A Skagit County hearing examiner has approved a permit for a gravel mine northwest of Sedro-Woolley. Concrete Nor’west has been trying since 2016 to open a mine on 51 acres near Grip and Prairie roads. Residents near the site have opposed the mine because of concerns about road safety, and about noise and environmental impacts. Emma Fletcher-Frazer reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)  See also: Permitting Pitfalls It’s been nine years since a gravel mine was proposed in Skagit County. After multiple appeals and a lawsuit, the application is at a standstill. Megan Neufeld reports. (The Planet Magazine)

Dabob Bay expansion
Washington Department of Natural Resources is holding a public hearing today  at 6 p.m. in Quilcene on a proposal to expand the boundaries of the Dabob Bay Natural Area by 3,860 acres to include globally rare forest types, streams, wetlands, shorelines and connecting habitats. Comment form here.

New research highlights where 'The Big One' earthquake could hit
New research offers a clearer picture of a fault line hundreds of kilometres long off the West Coast that is predicted to generate a major earthquake and tsunami commonly known as "The Big One." The study  confirms that the northern part of the fault, close to Vancouver Island and Washington, is most likely to produce a major earthquake. Isaac Phan Nay reports. (CBC)

The world is farming more seafood than it catches. Is that a good thing?
Last week, the FAO released its annual report on the state of aquaculture — which refers to the farming of both seafood and aquatic plants — and fisheries around the world. A new report from the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, or FAO, has found that more fish were farmed worldwide in 2022 than harvested from the wild, an apparent first. Frida Garza reports. (Grist/KNKX)

Seattle crows, beloved and feared, may be playing us with their primate-sized brains
Seattle has a thing about crows. Crows are ubiquitous to the city — a single roost at the University of Washington Bothell campus is home to as many as 16,000 birds. The sight of thousands of crows flying toward the campus at dusk has become one of Seattle’s signature attractions for those in the know. Stephen Howie reports. (KUOW)

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Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.


Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  222 AM PDT Mon Jun 17 2024    
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 10 kt, rising to 10 to 15 kt late. Seas 3 to  5 ft. Wave Detail: W 4 ft at 7 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, easing to 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas 3 to 5 ft. Wave Detail: W 4 ft at 7 seconds and W  2 ft at 11 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Friday, June 14, 2024

6/14 Sandstone, Makah whale hunt, environmental racism, endangered turtles, tarred murres, week in review

 

Sandstone [NPS]

Sandstone
Sandstone is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized silicate grains. Sandstones comprise about 20–25% of all sedimentary rocks. Most sandstone is composed of quartz or feldspar, because they are the most resistant minerals to the weathering processes at the Earth's surface. (Wikipedia)

Today's top story in Salish Current: After disaster strikes, how much is it worth to rebuild?

After nearly 25 years, federal officials approve a limited Makah whale hunt
A federal official has given the green light for members of the Makah tribe to resume exercising their treaty right to whaling, based on a request first made in 2005. Their last hunt took place in 1999.  With a waiver under the Marine Mammal Protection Act in hand, the tribe will be authorized to hunt and kill up to three eastern North Pacific gray whales per year over the next decade. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KNKX)

Canada just pledged to tackle environmental racism. What does that mean?
For nearly a decade, Ingrid Waldron has pushed for a federal bill to address the racial inequities of environmental harm in Canada. It finally passed. (The Nsrwhal) Denise Balkissoon reports. (The Narwhal)

A head start for Puget Sound's endangered turtles
The Puget Sound region is known for its salmon-filled estuaries and coastal forests, but on the southern portion of its range, evergreens give way to small patches of rolling grasslands that are home to some of Washington's rarest species. One of those species, the northwestern pond turtle, was recently proposed for listing under the Endangered Species Act. A captive breeding program is preparing these turtles for the challenges of life in the wild. Sarah DeWeerdt reports. (Salish Sea Currents Magazine)

At an Oregon wildlife centers, birds treated after mystery tar-like pollution
On May 19, a common murre arrived at the Wildlife Center of the North Coast in Olney with a patch of its underside that was nearly black, coated with a viscous, tar-like goop. Researchers still aren’t sure exactly what that goop is, or where it came from. Olivia Palmer reports. (Astorian)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 6/14/24: Cucumber Friday, BC salmon farms, rare fish, BC endangered species, low ocean oxygen, TMX oil quality, North Shore sewage plant, sandpiper vs port.

Have you read the Salish Current? 
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Here's your weekend tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  219 AM PDT Fri Jun 14 2024    
TODAY
 S wind 5 to 10 kt, veering to W this afternoon. Seas  3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 4 ft at 11 seconds. Showers this  morning. A slight chance of tstms until late afternoon. A chance  of showers this afternoon. TONIGHT  W wind 5 to 10 kt. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 4 ft  at 10 seconds. Showers.  
SAT
 SW wind around 5 kt, becoming W 10 to 15 kt in the  afternoon. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 2 ft at 3 seconds and W  4 ft at 9 seconds. Showers.  
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, easing to 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 2 ft at 4 seconds and W  4 ft at 9 seconds.  
SUN
 W wind 5 to 10 kt. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 3 ft at  8 seconds. A chance of showers in the afternoon.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Thursday, June 13, 2024

6/13 Basalt, wildfire season, Roberts Bank Terminal, Blackie Spit, BC oil quality concerns, North Shore sewage plant

 

Basalt

Basalt
Basalt is an aphanitic extrusive igneous rock formed from the rapid cooling of low-viscosity lava rich in magnesium and iron exposed at or very near the surface of a rocky planet or moon. More than 90% of all volcanic rock on Earth is basalt. (Wikipedia)

Wildfire season expected to come earlier and be slightly more active than usual in Washington
Drought conditions and Washington's low snowpack are contributing to expectations that fire activity will exceed what's considered typical. Helen Smith reports. (KING)

Can a tiny shorebird stop the massive expansion of a container port?
This is the story of a mud wrestle at the Fraser River delta. On one side, a government proposal for a massive expansion of a container port. On the other, a tiny bird, the sandpiper, which relies on this place as its last stopover on a migration as long as 7,000 miles. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

Conservationists call out trampling of sensitive Surrey park
Blackie Spit, in Boundary Bay in Surrey, B.C., is an important stop for dozens of species of migratory birds, but the environmentally sensitive habitat is threatened when people fail to stay on the designated pathway. Rafferty Baker reports. (CBC)

Oil refiners raise quality concerns over TMX pipeline shipments
U.S. oil refiners and West Coast traders are flagging concerns about the quality of crude shipped on the newly completed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion (TMX), warning that high vapour pressure and acidity limits could deter purchases of Canadian heavy barrels. The $34 billion expansion started operations last month and has nearly tripled shipping capacity to Canada's Pacific Coast to 890,000 barrels per day (bpd). Arathy Somasekhar and Nia Williams report. (Thomson Reuters)

North Shore sewage plant's bombshell budget a 'crossroads' for Metro Vancouver
The $2.83 billion cost overrun at Metro Vancouver’s North Shore wastewater treatment plant project landed like a bombshell that has prompted bigger questions about how the regional district handles such big projects and even how it’s governed. Derrick Penner reports. (Vancouver Sun)


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Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.


Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  239 AM PDT Thu Jun 13 2024    
TODAY
 W wind around 5 kt, rising to 15 to 20 kt. Seas 3 to  4 ft. Wave Detail: NW 3 ft at 4 seconds and W 4 ft at 11 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 20 kt, becoming SW 10 to 15 kt after  midnight. Seas 3 to 5 ft. Wave Detail: W 3 ft at 5 seconds and W  5 ft at 11 seconds. A chance of showers after midnight.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Wednesday, June 12, 2024

6/12 Quartz, commencement

 

Quartz [Wikipedia]

Quartz
Quartz is our most common mineral. Quartz is made of the two most abundant chemical elements on Earth: oxygen and silicon. Atoms of oxygen and silicon join together as tetrahedrons (three sided pyramids). These stack together to build crystals. (University of Waterloo)

Today's top story in Salish Current: Four island kids chase an ‘impossible’ dream

Salish Sea News and Weather takes a break today to attend an early morning commencement ceremony for our granddaughter who is graduating today from high school. News and Weather will return tomorrow. 

Mike.

Have you read the Salish Current? 
Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.


Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  901 PM PDT Tue Jun 11 2024    
WED  NW wind 5 to 10 kt, becoming W 10 to 15 kt in the  afternoon. Seas 4 to 6 ft. Wave Detail: NW 2 ft at 4 seconds and  W 6 ft at 10 seconds.  
WED NIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, easing to 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas 3 to 5 ft. Wave Detail: W 5 ft at 10 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Tuesday, June 11, 2024

6/11 Chert, BC endangered species ruling, coastal low oxygen, BNSF derailment cause

Chert
 

 Chert
Chert is widespread, but not widely known by the public as a distinct rock type. Chert has four diagnostic features: the waxy luster, a conchoidal (shell-shaped) fracture of the silica mineral chalcedony that composes it, a hardness of seven on the Mohs scale, and a smooth (non-clastic) sedimentary texture. Many types of chert fit into this categorization. (ThoughtCo.)

Today's top story in Salish Current: How a tragedy unfolded, step by step

Environment Minister Guilbeault broke the law in stalling potential spotted owl emergency order: court
‘Precedent-setting decision’ finds federal ministers must act with urgency when species face imminent threats to survival or recovery. Ainslie Cruickshank reports. (The Narwhal)

PNW coast suffers from low oxygen, study finds. It’s becoming the norm
About half of the water near the seafloor off the Pacific Northwest coast experienced low-oxygen conditions in 2021, according to a new study. And those hypoxic conditions, which are expected to become common with global warming, threaten the food web, the study found. The study from Oregon State University, published in Nature Scientific Reports, used data from 2021 to map out oxygen levels across the bottom 32 feet of the Pacific Northwest continental shelf. Amanda Zhou reports. (Seattle Times)

Federal agency says cause of last week’s BNSF derailment near Custer has been identified
Federal Railroad Administration has determined that the derailment of six Burlington Northern Santa Fe train cars last week was caused by a gap in switch points left by a previous train which had passed through. The train was carrying molten sulfur which did not spill. (Bellingham Herald)

Have you read the Salish Current? 
Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.


Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  224 AM PDT Tue Jun 11 2024    
TODAY
 S wind 10 to 15 kt, veering to W late this morning,  rising to 15 to 20 kt this afternoon. Seas 4 to 6 ft, building to  5 to 8 ft this afternoon. Wave Detail: W 8 ft at 12 seconds.  Showers early this morning, then a slight chance of showers late  this morning.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 20 kt, easing to around 10 kt after  midnight. Seas 6 to 9 ft, subsiding to 5 to 7 ft after midnight.  Wave Detail: W 9 ft at 12 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Monday, June 10, 2024

6/10 Agate, Bil Anders, BC salmon farms, I-2117 fiscal impact, NW bees, sunfish, BC mushrooms, plastic culture

Agates
 

Agate
Agate is the banded variety of chalcedony, which comes in a wide variety of colors. Agates are primarily formed within volcanic and metamorphic rocks. Agate Pass or Agate Passage is a high-current tidal strait in Puget Sound connecting Port Madison and mainland Kitsap County. Agate is a small community located on southern Puget Sound on the north side of the entrance to Hammersley Inlet. (Wikipedia)

Today's top story in Salish Current: 25 years later, memories of pipeline disaster still haunt families / Readers remember: Whatcom Creek, June 10, 1999

Apollo 8 astronaut dead after plane crash off the San Juans
Former Apollo 8 astronaut William Anders is dead at the age of 90 after an older-model plane crashed into the water and sank near the north end of Jones Island. Anders’ son Greg confirmed that his father was the lone pilot on the plane. Anders flew the first manned space mission to orbit the moon on Christmas Eve of 1968, known as the Apollo 8 “Genesis Flight.” It was then that he took the iconic “Earthrise” photo that shows the planet as a shadowed blue marble from space. Jason Upton reports. (My Bellingham Now)

Court rejects bid to review minister's order to B.C. salmon farms
The Federal Court has rejected a bid by two First Nations and salmon farm operators to review Ottawa's decision to not renew licences for 15 open-net Atlantic salmon farms in the waters off British Columbia.(Canadian Press) See also: Are B.C.’s open-net pen salmon farms closing — or not? Shalu Mehta writes. (The Narwhal)

Judge rejects attempt to keep budget effects of November initiatives off ballots
Information about how a trio of ballot measures would affect Washington’s budget can be printed on ballots this November, a judge ruled Friday. Thurston County Superior Court Judge Allyson Zipp denied a request from Republican Party Chair Jim Walsh and Mainstream Republicans of Washington Chair Deanna Martinez to keep the “public investment impact disclosures” for the three citizen initiatives from appearing.  Laurel Demkovich reports. (Washington State Standard)

Fewer Northwest bees shipped to California’s almonds could be a buzzkill for Washington and Oregon crops
Commercial beekeepers around the United States rent more than 2 million hives to pollinate almond crops in California. Hundreds of thousands of those hives are trucked from the greater Northwest.  However, there’s a problem this year. The pandemic, international shipping problems and over-planting have led to a glut of nuts in California, and almond growers there are in bad economic shape. Many of them are reducing their top expenses – like bees. That’s an issue for the beekeepers of the Northwest who rely on the income – and for the bees themselves. Anna King reports. (NWPB)

Rare 7-foot fish washed ashore on Oregon’s coast gets worldwide attention
A massive rare fish thought to only live in temperate waters in the southern hemisphere has washed up on Oregon’s northern coast, drawing crowds of curious onlookers intrigued by the unusual sight. The 7.3-foot hoodwinker sunfish first appeared on the beach in Gearhart on Monday, the Seaside Aquarium said in a media release. It was still on the beach on Friday and may remain there for weeks, the aquarium said, as it is difficult for scavengers to puncture its tough skin. (Associated Press)

Post-wildfire mushroom picking rush in B.C. causing conflicts
B.C. says it is not ruling out regulating wild mushroom picking after an Indigenous community said a rising number of foragers are infringing on its land, with one case involving alleged threats of physical violence and intimidation. The provincial response comes after the Skwlāx te Secwepemcúl̓ecw First Nation said the areas devastated by the Lower East Adams Lake and Bush Creek wildfires last year are now sprouting large numbers of morel mushrooms, attracting many foragers who are putting new pressures on the land's fragile ecosystem. Chuck Chiang reports. (Canadian Press)

Creating a throw-away culture: How companies ingrained plastics in modern life
Plastic became ingrained in modern life in large part because the plastics industry started working in the 1950s to convince people to embrace the material as cheap, abundant and disposable. The marketing campaign worked so well that litter soon became a problem across the U.S., and there was a public backlash. The industry responded by pitching recycling. But almost from the outset, corporations knew that recycling probably wouldn’t work to rein in waste, multiple investigations have shown.Michael Copley reports. (NPR)

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Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.


Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  211 AM PDT Mon Jun 10 2024    
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 10 kt. Seas 3 to 5 ft. Wave Detail: W 5 ft  at 10 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 NW wind 5 to 10 kt. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W  4 ft at 12 seconds. Showers likely after midnight.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Friday, June 7, 2024

6/7 Fern, lowest tides, Olympia oak, poison hemlock, Kayak Pt Park, Skagit sockeye, week in review

 



Fern
Fern from "Charlotte's Web" is the female human protagonist in the story, she is the one who saves Wilbur, a main character, from being slaughtered just because he is a runt. Fern's father is a farmer, and he allows Fern to care for the piglet. Fern forms a special bond with the pig that she names Wilbur. Some Fern.

Today's top story in Salish Current: There’s more to farmers markets than meets the eye

Where to see creatures as Puget Sound has lowest tides of year
More of the intertidal zone — where crabs, sculpin and sea stars hang out — will be exposed Thursday and Friday than at any other time this year. The Puget Sound area is forecast to see a the low tide on Friday at -3.32 feet, -2.95 feet Saturday and -2.31 feet Sunday. Amanda Zhou reports. (Seattle Times)

Tumwater mayor pauses plan to cut down historic Davis-Meeker oak tree
Tumwater Mayor Debbie Sullivan responded Tuesday night to an outpouring of concern from council members and the public and paused her plans to have the 400-year-old Davis-Meeker oak tree removed. The decision was made at the end of the Tumwater City Council’s June 4 meeting after dozens of members of the public voiced their concerns about the removal of the historic tree. Sullivan’s decision to have the tree removed also didn’t sit well with the council. Ty Vinson reports. (The Olympian)

King County warns of spread of toxic weed poison hemlock
Beware of the poison hemlock, an invasive weed so toxic it can be lethal, King County officials say. Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) has the ability to spread rapidly and often resembles other edible plants. But eating just a few of its leaves can kill. Paulo Villalobos Saborío reports. (Seattle Times)

Kayak Point, the county’s most popular park, to reopen by next weekend
After almost a year of construction, Kayak Point Regional Park will reopen ahead of schedule on June 14, the county announced Thursday. County staff closed the most popular park in the Snohomish County system on July 5, 2023, for the first phase of construction. The total project costs $20 million.
Ta'Leah Van Sistine reports. (Everett Herald)

Portion of Skagit River to open for sockeye fishing
The Skagit River from the Highway 536 bridge in Mount Vernon to the Dalles Bridge in Concrete will be open to sockeye salmon fishing from June 16 to July 15.  A limit of four sockeye salmon with a minimum size of 12 inches can be retained daily as harvestable numbers are forecast to return to the Baker River system. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 6/7/24: Legoland Friday, ocean acid, Thea Foss Waterway, whale protection, camas, disaster recovery, charging ferries, naming orca species.

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Here's your weekend tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  218 AM PDT Fri Jun 7 2024    
TODAY
 E wind 5 to 10 kt, backing to N late. Seas 3 to 5 ft.  Wave Detail: W 5 ft at 11 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind around 5 kt. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W  4 ft at 11 seconds.  
SAT
 W wind around 5 kt, rising to 5 to 10 kt in the afternoon.  Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 3 ft at 10 seconds and W 3 ft at  17 seconds.  
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 5 to 10 kt. Seas 4 to 6 ft. Wave Detail: W  2 ft at 5 seconds and W 6 ft at 15 seconds.  
SUN
 W wind around 5 kt, rising to around 10 kt in the  afternoon. Seas 4 to 6 ft. Wave Detail: W 2 ft at 6 seconds and W  6 ft at 14 seconds.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Thursday, June 6, 2024

6/6 Chain fern, orca species, Brave Little Hunter, green crabs

Giant Chain Fern [Native Plants PNW]
 

Giant Chain Fern Woodwardia fimbriata
he genus is named after British botanist Thomas J. Woodward.  Chain Ferns get their common name from the chain-like rows of oblong sori on the undersides of the pinnae. Giant Chain Fern has been found in Texada and Vancouver Islands in British Columbia, and in the Puget Sound region of Washington where it is listed as sensitive. Natives in California used the leaves for fiber to make baskets, and to line the top and bottom of an earth oven for baking acorn bread and other foods. (Native Plants PNW)

Today's top story in Salish Current: Study shows local health impacts from Growler noise

Decision time approaches for two new orca species, as other issues bring new questions
Killer whales worldwide are currently identified as a single species, Orcinus orca. But two new species of orca, representing thousands of whales in the North Pacific, could be added to the scientific nomenclature within the next month. Common names for the whales such as "transients" and "residents" are also up for debate. Christopher Dunagan writes. (Puget Sound Institute)

No confirmed sightings of orphaned orca: DFO
Social-media posts have reported sightings of lone, smaller orcas, but there have been no confirmed reports of the orca calf dubbed Brave Little Hunter. Darron Kloster reports. (Times Colonist)

Peninsula group ready for ‘all hands on deck’ fight against invasive crabs
South Island habitat restoration society encourages anyone to report European green crabs. Christine van Reeuwyk reports. (Victoria Today)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  230 AM PDT Thu Jun 6 2024    
TODAY
 NW wind 5 to 10 kt. Seas 4 to 6 ft. Wave Detail: W 6 ft  at 12 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 10 kt, backing to SW after midnight. Seas  3 to 5 ft. Wave Detail: W 5 ft at 12 seconds.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Wednesday, June 5, 2024

6/5 Maidenhair fern, Sumas Valley flood, WSF new design, electricity for ferries, sea floor expedition

Western Maidenhair Fern [Native Plants PNW]


Western Maidenhair Fern Adiantum aleuticum
Common names include: Five-finger Fern and Northern or Aleutian Maidenhair. The term Maidenhair may have been derived from the species A. capillus-veneris, (literally Venus’s hair), perhaps due to the dark, glossy hair-like leaf stalks.  Western Maidenhair can be found from the Aleutian Islands and southeast Alaska to Chihuahua in Mexico. Natives used the stems of Maidenhair Fern in basketry designs.  They also used a tea made from the leaves as a hair wash.  The Quinault burnt the leaves and rubbed ashes in their hair to make it long, shiny and black.  (Native Plants PNW)

Today's top story in Salish Current: WSF service, bad as it’s ever been, only going to get worse

After disaster strikes, how much is it worth to rebuild?
In 2021, flooding in the Sumas Valley caused millions in damages. Rebuilding could cost more than twice as much as restoring the region to its natural state. Steph Kwetásel’wet Wood (The Narwhal)

WA shows off new design for its ferries — now it needs a shipbuilder
Ferry officials and state lawmakers shared plans Monday for a new generation of hybrid-electric ferries to ply Puget Sound waters, with promises to bring reliability and an emission-free fleet to a diesel-hungry system that has been plagued by reduced services and cancellations for years. Nicholas Deshais reports. (Seattle Times)

The tricky business of charging Washington's coming hybrid electric ferries
Every ferry terminal presents a different sort of puzzle when it comes to installing charging equipment. there are many different power utilities to work with. And there are unrelated construction sites nearby, over which the ferry system has no control. One reason it's so complicated is that the ferries use so much power. The Bremerton boat, for example, will have the same battery capacity as 230 electric cars. Plus, it will have to charge fully within 18 minutes, so there's no delay in the ferry's departure schedule. Joshua McNichols reports. (KUOW)

Scientists eager to view sea floor after earthquake swarm
Scientists will use remotely operated vehicles equipped with cameras to descend up to two kilometres to see the effects of hundreds of earthquakes that rumbled over the Pacific Ocean seafloor off Vancouver Island in March. And the public is invited to come along via a live internet stream. Darron Kloster reports. (Times Colonist)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  234 AM PDT Wed Jun 5 2024    
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS EVENING
   
TODAY
 S wind around 5 kt, backing to SE late this morning,  veering to W this afternoon. Seas 6 to 9 ft. Wave Detail: W 9 ft  at 14 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 10 kt. Seas 5 to 7 ft. Wave Detail: W 7 ft  at 13 seconds.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Tuesday, June 4, 2024

6/4 Western oak fern, BC orca protections, ship noise, BNSF trespass, camas, PSP closure, swimming advisory

Western Oak Fern [Native Plants PNW]
 

Western Oak Fern  Gymnocarpium dryopteris
There are only about 8 species of gymnocarpium, mostly in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere.   Common names of G. dryopteris include Western or Northern Oak Fern. G. disjunctum is confined to the coastal northwest of North America and the Pacific coast of Russia.  In the Pacific Northwest, these ferns grow in shady, moist woods, streambanks and wet cliffs.  Despite its name, it is not usually found in association with oaks, preferring mixed coniferous forests. [Native Plants PNW]

Today's top story in Salish Current: Bellingham Queer Collective opens its doors

Speed restrictions, B.C. fishery closures, aim to protect southern killer whales
The federal government has announced salmon fishery closures and mandatory speed limits in areas where southern resident killer whales forage and travel in the ongoing effort to protect the endangered species. Until Nov. 30, all vessels must slow down to a maximum of 10 knots in two speed-restricted zones near Swiftsure Bank and no vessels or fishing are allowed in interim sanctuary zones off South Pender Island and the southeast end of Saturna Island. Recreational and commercial salmon fisheries will be closed both this year and next year in the whale's key foraging areas along Swiftsure Bank from July 15 until Oct. 31 and around the mouth of the Fraser River from Aug. 1 to Sept. 30. (Canadian Press)

Quieting the Global Growl
Underwater noise from ships has gotten louder, reshaping marine ecosystems and the lives of animals that depend on sounds to eat, mate, and navigate. Can ships ever pipe down? Amorina Kingdon writes. (Hakai Magazine)

A WA tribe will get paid by a railroad that trespassed. The question is how much
A federal judge found BNSF Railway willingly, consciously and knowingly trespassed when it ran about a quarter-million cars carrying crude oil over the Swinomish Reservation beyond what was outlined in an agreement with the tribe. Now, the issue at hand is how much money the railway must pay to make it right...A bench trial is underway before U.S. District Court Judge Robert Lasnik this week to determine the profits BNSF obtained as a result of its interference with the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community’s legally protected property rights. Isabella Breda reports. (Seattle Times)

NW Indigenous people have long history of carefully managing camas crop
A prized plant for regional Native Americans has been carefully cultivated for more than 3,500 years, according to an Oregon State University study. Camas is a First Foods staple for Native Americans, who traditionally baked the bulbs in earthen ovens. Brian Bull reports. (KLCC)

Shellfish biotoxin closes entire Oregon Coast to mussel harvesting, sends some people to hospital
Oregon officials closed the state’s entire coast to mussel harvesting on Friday after an unprecedented outbreak of paralytic shellfish poisoning, which appears to also be affecting parts of Washington and California. April Ehrich reports. (OPB)

Bellingham issues swimming advisory for popular park after testing reveals high levels of bacteria
Swimmers are being advised to stay out of the water near Taylor Dock at the southern end of Boulevard Park due to high levels of bacteria. Whatcom County Health and Community Services issued an advisory on May 31 notifying the public to ‘Swim at your own risk,’ as measured bacteria levels in the water exceeded health standards and could cause illness. Rachel Showalter reports. (Bellingham Herald)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  202 AM PDT Tue Jun 4 2024    
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
   
TODAY
 SW wind 20 to 25 kt, easing to 15 to 20 kt late. Seas  5 to 7 ft. Wave Detail: SW 3 ft at 5 seconds and W 7 ft at  10 seconds. Showers likely this morning. A slight chance of  tstms. A chance of showers this afternoon.  
TONIGHT
 SW wind 15 to 20 kt, easing to 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas 6 to 9 ft. Wave Detail: W 2 ft at 4 seconds and W  9 ft at 13 seconds.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Monday, June 3, 2024

6/3 Lady fern, Thea Foss Waterway, ocean acid, Herring's House, power of fire, Tumwater oak tree, endangered fern

 

Lady Fern [Native Plants PNW]

Lady Fern  Athyrium filix-femina
Lady Fern is abundant throughout the northern hemisphere; found in all the states and provinces in North America. Natives ate the roots/rhizomes after roasting or baking in a pit.  They should always be cooked prior to eating. (Native Plants PNW)

Today's top story in Salish Current: Finally! State ferry system goes out to bid for new hybrid-electric vessels

This Tacoma Waterway contains the most polluted water in the PNW
The Thea Foss Waterway is one of the most polluted recreational waterways in the United States, according to the Surfrider Foundation which found high levels of potentially dangerous bacteria in the Foss during 47 percent of its monthly testing visits. Only five sites were higher across the nation. All told, 57 labs processed 9,538 water samples collected from the 567 sites. Craig Sailor reports. (Tacoma News Tribune)

Tribes seek to turn the tide on ocean acidity
Tribal nations and other partners look for ways to reduce ocean acidity, which has increased 30 percent in 250 years. Richard Arlin Walker reports. (ICT)

When Settlers Burned Herring’s House, an Ancient Duwamish Settlement
Archaeologists believe Herring’s House to have been the longest continually inhabited native village in North America. Then, in a few minutes during March of 1893, Herring’s House fell to an arsonist’s torch, and a 1,300-year history went up in smoke. John Brockhaus writes. (Post Alley)

The healing power of fire
Bringing back ancient Indigenous fire practices helps restore cultural connections, heal the land and strengthen communities. On Gitanyow lands, restorative fire brings people together and mitigates increasingly intense and widespread wildfires driven by climate change.  Matt Simmons reports. (The Narwhal)  See: Umatilla tribal leader passes the drip torch to future generations learning about prescribed fire. April Ehrich reports. (OPB)

Court revokes protective order for historic Tumwater oak tree
Recently, the city just south of Washington state’s capital has been cut up over a 400-year-old oak tree. The city calls the Davis Meeker Garry oak unsafe. Advocates say the historic tree needs to be preserved. At a court hearing Friday, Thurston County Superior Court Judge Anne Egeler sided with the city. She decided to remove a temporary restraining order, put in place May 24. The order was aimed at protecting the tree. Courtney Flatt reports. (NW News Network)

The little fern that could move a mine

A federal emergency order could stop a proposed open-pit mine near Rossland, B.C., but the odds are stacked against the threatened species. Francesca Fionda reports. (The Narwhal)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  230 AM PDT Mon Jun 3 2024  
TODAY  SW wind 15 to 20 kt. Seas 5 to 7 ft. Wave Detail: W 2 ft  at 4 seconds, SW 3 ft at 7 seconds and W 7 ft at 11 seconds.  Rain.  
TONIGHT
 S wind 15 to 20 kt, rising to 20 to 25 kt after  midnight. Seas 5 to 7 ft. Wave Detail: SE 4 ft at 5 seconds and W  7 ft at 11 seconds. Showers.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Friday, May 31, 2024

5/31 Rough piddock, WA salmon passages, Indigenous MPAs, forested wetlands, LNG ad greenwashing, Prince Rupert LNG, woodpecker metalheads, week in review

Rough Piddock [Robert Gorman]
 

Rough Piddock  Zirfaea pilsbryi
The Rough Piddock is a clam able to drill through rock. Rough Piddocks have shells up to 6 inches long, one half smooth and the other rough with ridges and points. A fleshy foot extending from the rough end sticks to rock like a sucker. Once in place, muscles in the piddock's foot and body slowly turn the rough shell against the clay or rock and grind away. Thirty slight turns take an hour and rotate the piddock a full circle. Then the creature changes direction and grinds the other way. Slowly, the piddock burrows in. (Friends of Skagit Beaches)

Today's top stories in Salish Current: Limited-equity co-op model moves Lopez Island affordable housing forward / Cute ... and dangerous: suburban deer hazards are real

WA salmon passage projects are getting more than $75 million
Migrating salmon and steelhead face all kinds of obstacles littered throughout Washington. But piece by piece, those barriers will be removed, thanks in part to nearly $75 million from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and Inflation Reduction Act. Nearly $40 million of the funding announced will go to nine projects led by tribal nations, including tearing out a dam, culverts and other barriers to fish passage in rivers and streams from the Skagit to the Klickitat. Another four projects, including an effort to reconnect 125 river miles on the western Olympic Peninsula, received nearly $36 million. Isabella Breda reports. (Seattle Times)

Mapping the Growth of Indigenous Marine Protected and Conserved Areas
First Nations are managing their coastal territories in response to colonization. Stories from 10 news outlets explains how. Pippa Norman reports. (The Tyee)

Forested Wetlands Are Missing from Maps
Before they can be conserved, “cryptic” carbon-rich wetlands in the Pacific Northwest need to be documented. Natalia Mesa reports. (High County News/Hakai Magazine)

Leaked Decision Slams LNG Ads for Greenwashing
Claims made about LNG in wraparound ads that ran in major daily newspapers, including the Victoria Times Colonist, could not be substantiated by Ad Standards Canada, a leaked document reveals. Amanda Follett Hosgood  reports. (The Tyee)

Prince Rupert port to get busier with $1.35B gas export plant
Calgary-based AltaGas Ltd. and Netherlands-based joint venture partner Royal Vopak have approved a final investment decision for a large-scale liquefied petroleum gas and bulk liquids terminal project near Prince Rupert, B.C. The companies say site clearing work is more than 95 per cent complete and the project is expected to come online near the end of 2026. (Canadian Press)

'Chimney caps, vent pipes, gutters': Why some woodpeckers are major metal heads
Kevin McGowan, an ornithologist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, said woodpeckers batter wood to find food, make a home, mark territory and attract a mate. But when they bash away at metal, primarily during the springtime breeding season, their metallic racket has two purposes, "basically summarized as: All other guys stay away, all the girls come to me." Sacha Pfeiffer reports. (NPR)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 5/31/24: Parrot Friday, BC old-growth, owl wars, BC hydrogen, raising sea stars, Woodfibre LNG, AK youth climate suit, salmon barriers.

Have you read the Salish Current? 
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Here's your weekend tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  223 AM PDT Fri May 31 2024    
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 10 kt, becoming NW 10 to 15 kt late this  morning and afternoon. Seas around 3 ft. Wave Detail: NW 2 ft at  4 seconds and W 3 ft at 8 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, easing to 5 to 10 kt after  midnight. Seas around 3 ft. Wave Detail: NW 2 ft at 4 seconds and  W 3 ft at 7 seconds. A chance of rain in the evening, then rain  after midnight.  
SAT
 W wind 5 to 10 kt, becoming N in the afternoon. Seas 3 to  4 ft. Wave Detail: W 4 ft at 10 seconds. Rain likely in the  morning, then a chance of showers in the afternoon.  
SAT NIGHT
 W wind around 5 kt. Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W  4 ft at 10 seconds. A chance of showers in the evening, then rain  after midnight.  
SUN
 E wind 10 to 15 kt. Seas 3 to 5 ft. Wave Detail: SE 2 ft  at 4 seconds and W 4 ft at 10 seconds. Rain.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Thursday, May 30, 2024

5/30 Gaper clam, Woodfibre LNG, deer danger, BC ferries sale, AK youth climate suit

 

Gaper clam [Dave Cowles]

Gaper clam
Two species of gapers occur in Puget Sound: the fat gaper or Alaskan gaper (Tresus capax), and the less-common Pacific gaper (T. nuttallii), which has a narrower shell. Both species have a wide gape at one end of their shells to accommodate large tube-like siphons, used for water exchange. The siphons of gaper clams and geoducks are too large to be completely pulled inside their shells, so both must bury themselves deeply to avoid being chomped by predators like Dungeness crabs, moon snails, sea stars, and gulls. Gaper clams aren’t as strong diggers as their “better-at-everything” cousins the geoducks, but individuals can still be found up to four feet deep. (WDFW)

Today's top story in Salish Current: Land acknowledgments: from words to transformative actions

Squamish environmental group challenges Woodfibre LNG, FortisBC wastewater permits
The BC Energy Regulator has issued a permit for Woodfibre LNG to release more than 1,200 litres of contaminated wastewater daily into the Howe Sound fjord. Ainslie Cruickshank reports. (The Narwhal)

Cute and Dangerous: Suburban Deer Hazards are Real
Back in April 2016, volunteers in Port Townsend counted 230 deer in a half-hour survey that did not cover the entire city. Since then, deer numbers have grown. The mayor himself recently counted 49 deer in a 1.5-mile loop walk near his PT home, and posted his own video of being menaced by an aggressive deer. Karen Sullivan writes. (Rainshadow Journal)

B.C. Ferries seeks offers for four retired vessels
Queen of Burnaby, Mayne Queen, Bowen Queen and ­Powell River Queen are listed in the corporation’s request for ­proposals. Carla Wilson reports. (Times Colonist)

Youth climate-change lawsuit targets Alaska LNG project
Eight young Alaska residents sued the state on Wednesday seeking to block a major natural gas project, the latest in a string of climate-change related lawsuits by youths arguing that government policies promoting fossil fuels violate their rights. The Anchorage state court lawsuit, brought by a group of plaintiffs ranging in age from 11 to 22, alleges that an Alaska law mandating the project's development infringes on their due process rights and other constitutional protections by causing the release of greenhouse gases that harm their health and livelihood. Clark Mindock reports. (Reuters)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  217 AM PDT Thu May 30 2024    
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 10 kt, rising to 10 to 15 kt this afternoon.  Seas 3 to 4 ft. Wave Detail: W 4 ft at 9 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 15 kt, easing to around 5 kt after  midnight. Seas around 3 ft. Wave Detail: W 3 ft at 9 seconds.

---

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate



Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told