Friday, May 17, 2024

5/17 Columbine, Nooksack flooding, tidal marshes, orca superpower, boat invasives rule, week in review

Columbine
 

Columbine
Aquilegia is a genus of about 60–70 species of perennial plants that are found in meadows, woodlands, and at higher altitudes throughout the Northern Hemisphere, known for the spurred petals of their flowers. (Wikipedia)

Today's top stories in Salish Current: Jail, behavioral health, community policing challenge new Whatcom County sheriff / Lopez author’s debut novel rooted in people and place

Crossborder Nooksack teams have met 10 times since October
Ten meetings in 10 months might not sound like a lot, but given recent history, the nine governments trying to prevent another devastating Nooksack River flood might as well be teenagers who can’t get off the phone with one another. Whether they’ll ever be able to take things to the next level remains to be seen. Tyler Olsen reports. (Fraser Valley Current)

Rare tidal marshes set the table for salmon recovery

Tidal wetlands are crucial to Chinook salmon recovery but are among the most threatened habitats in Puget Sound. In 2012, The Nature Conservancy began restoring a 150-acre section of tidal marsh on Port Susan Bay at the mouth of the Stillaguamish River. That project is entering a new phase and may soon connect with other adjacent restoration efforts put forth by the Stillaguamish Tribe. Eric Wagner reports. (Salish Sea Current Magazine)

UBC discovery of orca’s superpower makes them even more scary as yacht attacks rise
In a story that is becoming terrifyingly common, another yacht was sunk this week by a gang of orcas in the Strait of Gibraltar. And new research from scientists at the University of British Columbia shows that these killer whales are so efficient at breathing, they can perform a dive on just a single breath of air. The researchers combined drone footage with data from tags suction-cupped to 11 orcas off the coast of B.C. to gather information on the animals’ habits. They found that the whales in their study took about 1.2 breaths per minute while resting, and 1.5 to 1.8 per minute while travelling or hunting. (National Post)

B.C. imposes new rules on boaters to stop spread of parasite
British Columbia's chief veterinarian has issued an order making it illegal to transport boats or other watercraft without removing the drain plug to prevent the spread of whirling disease. Whirling disease, which is fatal in fish, is caused by a microscopic parasite that mainly targets salmon and trout. The Ministry of Water, Land and Resource Stewardship says the order takes effect on Friday and is also intended to keep invasive mussels out of B.C. waterways.(Canadian Press)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 5/17/24: ESA Day, chinook runs, peregrine falcons, MPAs, cultural burns, jet noise danger, Oly Peninsula marmots, ship pollution, Nooksack flooding.

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Here's your weekend tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  202 AM PDT Fri May 17 2024    
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 AM PDT THIS MORNING
   
TODAY
 W wind 15 to 25 kt becoming 15 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. NW swell 8 ft at 9 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 20 kt easing to 5 to 15 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. NW swell 7 ft at 9 seconds  subsiding to 5 ft at 9 seconds after midnight.  
SAT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt rising to 15 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 6 ft at 9 seconds.  
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt easing to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft subsiding to 1 ft or less after midnight. W  swell 4 ft at 8 seconds.  
SUN
 Light wind becoming W to 10 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 1 ft or less. W swell 5 ft at 8 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Thursday, May 16, 2024

5/16 Spearnose poacher, cruise ship pollution, humans and pollinators, DFO salmon farm virus

Northern Spearnose Poacher


Northern Spearnose Poacher Agonopsis vulsa
The northern spearnose poacher, also known as the window-tailed sea-poacher or the windowtail poacher, is a fish in the family Agonidae. It was described by David Starr Jordan and Charles Henry Gilbert in 1880, originally under the genus Agonus. It is a marine, temperate water-dwelling fish which is known from the eastern Pacific Ocean, including southeastern Alaska to southern California. It dwells at a depth range of 0 to 163 metres (0 to 535 ft). Males can reach a maximum total length of 20 centimetres (7.9 in). (Wikipedia)

Today's top stories in Salish Current: Tales of tricksters and triumphs: 35th year of Vancouver’s Shakespeare festival opens June 11 /Campus protests over Gaza part of a proud tradition

Endangered orca habitat sullied by Canadian cruise ship pollution
Cruise ships are jeopardizing endangered southern resident killer whales by dumping billions of litres of polluted wastewater into the ocean, new federal government documents reveal.There was a 14-fold increase in the total number of ships employing scrubber technology in coastal waters between 2018 and 2022, recent data submitted by Environment and Climate Change Canada to an international environment organization revealed. Rochelle Baker reports. (Canadian Press)

New Indigenous-led PacSci exhibit connects humans and pollinators
The living pathway invites Pacific Science Center guests to form relationships with their surrounding environment through observation. Skylar Stekly reports. (Crosscut)

B.C. First Nation to reactivate judicial review of DFO’s salmon farm virus policy
A B.C. First Nation says it has lost faith in federal plans to remove open net-pens from the province’s ocean salmon farms and is reluctantly relaunching legal action it had on hold that challenges Fisheries Department aquaculture policy. (Canadian Press)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  244 AM PDT Thu May 16 2024    SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH  FRIDAY MORNING    
TODAY
 SW wind 5 to 15 kt becoming W 10 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 4 ft at 11 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 25 kt becoming NW after midnight. Wind  waves 2 to 4 ft. W swell 4 ft at 13 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Wednesday, May 15, 2024

5/15 Sturgeon poacher, Navy jet noise, marmots, carbon emissions, owl housing

Sturgeon poacher
 

Sturgeon Poacher Agonus acipenserinus
The Sturgeon Poacher can grow up to 12 inches in length. They have a slender, tapering body that is covered with scales that are actually modified bony plates. Found from Northern California to the Bering Sea in Alaska, in shallow waters to depths of about 200’, these fish have very small mouths, that are surrounded by clumps of cirri. These cirri actually contain their taste buds which are used to grovel through the sand and silt bottoms it prefers to inhabit in search of a tasty shrimp or other very small invertebrate. (Scott Boyd)

Today's top story in Salish Current: What tighter fed PFAS mandates mean for local contaminated communities

Navy jet noise could mean long-term health impacts for Whidbey Island
More than 74,000 people on Whidbey Island could face long-term health impacts from the U.S. Navy jet noise that’s blasted over residents several days a week for over a decade, new research shows.  A study  from the University of Washington, published last week in the Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, reports the noise from the Boeing EA-18G Growlers and their training drills present a “substantial risk” to two-thirds of Island County residents. Elise Takahama reports. (Seattle Times)

Environmentalists seek protections for marmots on Olympic Peninsula
Environmentalists say the species is in trouble, with around 2,000 to 4,000 of the animals believed to be left after a sharp population decline from the 1990s to mid-2000s. With this in mind, the Center for Biological Diversity this week petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to grant the marmots, which can grow to around 32 inches long and weigh up to 20 pounds, new protections under the federal Endangered Species Act. Bill Lucia reports. (Washington State Standard)

The carbon cost of return-to-office mandates
Many companies made headway during the pandemic on promises to go green. But with work commutes required again, emissions are rising. Kate Yoder reports. (Grist/Crosscut)

Climate Change and Housing Adaptation: Owl Edition
After scores of barn owls died in overheated nest boxes, conservationists set out to give the birds less heat-prone homes. Larry Pynn reports. (Hakai Magazine)

Have you read the Salish Current? 
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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  241 AM PDT Wed May 15 2024    
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt rising to 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the afternoon. W  swell 3 to 7 ft at 7 seconds becoming NW 3 to 4 ft at 7 seconds  in the afternoon.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. NW swell 4 ft at 10 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Tuesday, May 14, 2024

5/14 Pygmy poacher, WA summer, marine protected areas, Skagit fishing, saving old-growth, controlled burns, First Nations rent, sunken boat

Pygmy poacher [Mark Lloyd]
 

Pygmy poacher Odontopyxis trispinosa
The pygmy poacher is a species of poacher that is native to the eastern Pacific Ocean along the North American coast from southern Alaska to northern Mexico. This species occurs at depths of from 9 to 373 metres (30 to 1,224 ft). This species grows to a length of 9.5 centimetres (3.7 in) total length. Common but inconspicuous. (Wikipedia)

Today's top story in Salish Current: OPALCO proposes to harness tidal power for San Juans

How warm will Washington state get during summer 2024?
Weather forecasters have long been talking about a warmer-than-normal summer 2024 in Washington state, but as the season gets closer, it appears the region may only get slightly warmer than average. Natalie Akane Newcomb and Angela King report. (KUOW)

OSU Scientists, Marine Biodiversity Opportunities are Being Lost
An international collaboration that includes two Oregon State University scientists says the world’s largest marine protected areas aren’t collectively delivering the biodiversity benefits they could be because of slow implementation of management strategies and a failure to restrict the most impactful human activities. Steve Lundeberg reports. (Corvallis Advocate)

Skagit River closing to salmon fishing
The Skagit River will close Wednesday to salmon fishing until further notice. The river will be closed from the Highway 536 bridge in Mount Vernon to Gilligan Creek. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife made the decision to close the river based on harvestable numbers of hatchery spring Chinook forecast to return to the Marblemount Hatchery. Vince Richardson reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Not Too Wet To Burn
Amid an uptick in wildfires, scientists search for lessons on how to save old-growth rainforests from a fiery future. Madeline Ostrander reports. (Hakai Magazine)

‘A Good Fire’: How Prescribed Cultural Burns Protect Communities
They’re rooted in generational knowledge. And they’re long overdue. Aaron Hemens reports. (The Tyee)

On Vancouver Island, residents are paying voluntary rent to First Nations
‘It’s a good step towards mending our relationship’: a growing network of reciprocity trusts allow settlers to contribute to the communities whose lands they live on. Julie Gordon reports. (The Narwhal)

Sunken fishing vessel raised, fuel offloaded at Henry island
Divers used a pump truck onboard a barge to retrieve more than 1,900 litres of diesel fuel from the Chief Joseph, which sank May 3. Darron Kloster reports. (Times Colonist)

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Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  243 AM PDT Tue May 14 2024    
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 2 PM PDT THIS AFTERNOON
 THROUGH THIS EVENING    
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 15 to 25 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 2 to 4 ft in the  afternoon. W swell 3 to 7 ft at 9 seconds subsiding to 4 ft at  9 seconds in the afternoon.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 25 kt easing to 5 to 15 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft subsiding to 2 ft or less after  midnight. W swell 3 ft at 12 seconds building to 5 ft at  14 seconds after midnight.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Monday, May 13, 2024

5/13 Paper birch, chinook run, peregrine falcons, Bear Divide, First Nation land, BC drought, Whatcom Co housing

Paper Birch
 

Paper Birch Betula papyrifera
Paper Birch gets its name from the way the bark on older trees will peel in thin, white, papery sheets.  It is also sometimes called Canoe Birch or White Birch. Paper Birch is widely distributed throughout the northern regions of North America from Alaska to Newfoundland. West of the Cascades, Paper Birch is mostly found north of the Skagit in Washington State, but may also occur in the southern Puget Sound region. (Native Plants of the PNW)

Today's top story in Salish Current: San Juan and Skagit county council candidates file for August primary

Low Chinook runs endanger prime fishing rivers in Snohomish County
Even in pristine salmon habitat like the Sultan, Chinook numbers are down. Warm water and extreme weather are potential factors. Ta'Leah Van Sistine reports. (Everett Herald)

Peregrine falcons laced with banned chemicals, Canadian scientists find
The fastest animal on the planet, peregrine falcons can't seem to escape contamination from banned toxic flame retardants, a new study has found. Stefan Labbé reports. (Times Colonist)

On this unassuming trail near LA, bird watchers see something spectacular
Bear Divide is unique because it's like a passageway through the wall of the San Gabriels. Birds are funneled through, says Kelly Reckling, a PhD student at UCLA who studies bird migration, and fly low enough for researchers to identify, catch and study the species as they pass. On a really good day, Reckling says, you can see up to 20,000 birds zooming by as they travel north for the summer. Kai McNamee reports. (NPR)

B.C. returns land on Island to Lyackson First Nation
Lyackson Nation and Cowichan Tribes are holding the land in partnership until there is a plan to divide the land between the two. Michael John Lo reports. (Times Colonist)

Space program captures images of B.C.'s dry riverbeds as drought continues
Images from Canadian mission show narrow waterways reflecting lack of rain, snow. Andrew Kurjata reports.(CBC)

With state policy stuck, a county charts its own path to allow more rural housing
State lawmakers heard from Whatcom County leaders about efforts there to allow more backyard cottages and other accessory dwelling units. Laura Demkovich reports. (Washington State Standard)

Have you read the Salish Current? 
Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.


Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  239 AM PDT Mon May 13 2024    
TODAY
 W wind 10 to 20 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 2 to  5 ft at 11 seconds building to 4 to 6 ft at 10 seconds in the  afternoon.  
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SW to 10 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft subsiding to 1 ft or less after  midnight. W swell 6 ft at 10 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Friday, May 10, 2024

5/10 Blue elderberry, GiveBIG, TMX, Point Defiance aquarium, BC drought, ash borer, Zodiac, Esutarium

Blue Elderberry


Blue Elderberry Sambucus nigra ssp. cerulea
Blue Elderberry was sometimes known as S. glauca; it is more commonly known as Sambucus cerulea (or cerulean), but many botanists feel that it and the American Elderberry, Sambucus canadensis, are just a subspecies of the well-known European species, the Black Elder, Sambucus nigra. Elder trees were important in Celtic folklore and mythology; they were considered sacred to fairies and were used for making wands. 

Today's top story in Salish Current: Trans Mountain is a metaphor for larger economic and political forces at play

Thank you for GivingBIG!
We did our best to meet our $10,000 GiveBIG match challenge and thank readers who supported nonprofit, no-paywall community journalism. There's still time to double your one-time or monthly donation by making a GiveBIG donation to support Salish Current. Mike Sato.

Have you read the Salish Current? 
Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.

Groups opposed to pipeline call for B.C. to push for oil spill evacuation plan
Dozens of health officials, Indigenous and environmental groups and city councillors opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion are calling on B.C. to push the federal government for a more robust oil spill response plan. Tiffany Crawford reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Point Defiance aquarium set to reopen after $7M renovation
Point Defiance Zoo is expected to reopen its Tropical Reef Aquarium this summer, the zoo announced this week. Formerly called the “South Pacific Aquarium,” the 25,000-square-foot area will boast colorful fish and sharks in a tropical coral-reef environment, according to a news release. The June 14 reopening comes after years of repairs and restorations to habitats, life-support systems and animal-care structures. Simone Carter reports. (Tacoma News Tribune)

'Every drop counts': B.C. prepares for impacts of ongoing drought
Parts of British Columbia will likely enter "unfamiliar territory" with drought if they see another hot, dry summer, says the head of the province's River Forecast Centre. Dave Campbell says persistent drought conditions in B.C. stretch back to 2022, so the province is heading into this summer with "multi-year" precipitation deficits. Brenna Owen reports. (Canadian Press)

Invasive ash-tree-destroying beetle found in B.C. for 1st time
A highly destructive invasive beetle that kills ash trees has been found in B.C., marking the first time it has been officially recorded in the province. Larvae of the emerald ash borer were recently found in Vancouver by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, indicating that the bug has been on the move into B.C. from other provinces. Tessa Vikander reports. (CBC)  See: State crews remove trees in Washington County [OR] to slow spread of emerald ash borer. Cassandra Profita reports. (OPB)

Schooner Zodiac Celebrates a Century at Sea
On a beautiful spring or summer day, it’s not uncommon to glimpse the two-masted schooner Zodiac bobbing on the waters of the Salish Sea. For decades, it has conducted private charters and public cruises, transporting locals and tourists from the Bellingham Cruise Terminal into the splendor of the San Juan Islands and beyond. Matt Benoit writes. (WhatcomTalk)

Puget Sound Estuarium
The Puget Sound Estuarium was created in 2007 by the South Sound Estuary Association. According to their website, their mission is to, “foster learning opportunities that inspire people of all ages to connect with, protect, and enjoy the unique estuary environment of Puget Sound.” Kristina Lotz writes. (ThurstonTalk)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 5/10/24: Mandela Friday, Elwha fishery, youth climate suit,Ksi Lisims LNG, bumblebees, Hood Canal summer chum, tides, fish pens, TMX.

Here's your weekend tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  203 AM PDT Fri May 10 2024    
TODAY
 E wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. W swell 3 ft at  11 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 NW wind to 10 kt in the evening becoming light. Wind  waves 1 to 2 ft. W swell 4 ft at 11 seconds.  
SAT
 NW wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 4 ft at  10 seconds.  
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 to 3 ft. W swell  5 ft at 10 seconds.  
SUN
 W wind to 10 kt rising to 15 to 25 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft building to 3 to 5 ft in the afternoon. W swell  4 ft at 9 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



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Thursday, May 9, 2024

5/9 Turkish washcloth, GiveBIG, 'green' hydrogen, spongy moth, fish pens, tides, ptarmigan, BC drought, kelp octopus

 

Turkish washcloth [UPS]

Turkish washcloth Mastocarpus papillatus
Reddish-brown to blackish, it grows in abundance on rocky substrates in the high to mid intertidal zones of Pacific Northwest coastal waters. The coloration of red algae is an adaptation to growing in deeper water, as their red pigment (phycoerythrin) involved in photosynthesis reflects red and absorbs blue wavelengths, which penetrate into deeper water. Not really used by Turks as a washcloth. [UPS]

Today's top story in Salish Current: Pipeline explosion: Part 2 — Healing and aftermath / Mariner Musing: The Mariners are in first place atop the AL West Division

It's not too late to GiveBIG

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AltaGas outlines economic potential of ‘green’ hydrogen plant at former Intalco site
A Canadian energy company described plans for a “green” hydrogen manufacturing and storage facility at the site of the former Intalco aluminum smelter in the Cherry Point industrial area west of Ferndale. If brought to full fruition, the AltaGas Ltd. project could cost $850 million to $1 billion and provide hundreds of living wage jobs in Whatcom County during its construction phase, a company official said Wednesday. Robert Mittendorf reports. (Bellingham Herald)  See: Green hydrogen plans take shape for former Alcoa site at Cherry Point (Salish Current, Jan. 24, 2024)

Emergency declared for spongy moth invading Washington state
A foreign invader, of the pest variety, is posing imminent danger to plants in Washington state. The spongy moth has been sighted in Thurston and Skagit counties. The state is now revving up airplane engines to go spray two large areas to get rid of the moths...The state is specifically calling out two spongy moth hot spots: a 920-acre area in Concrete, and 1,383 acres at Steamboat Island Road and Highway 101 near Olympia. Last year, 103 spongy moths were captured in these areas. Paige Browning reports. (KUOW)  See: Giant hornet effort approaches milestone as another pest shows up (Salish Current, Feb. 26, 2024)

Diverse cast calls for end to B.C.'s open-net fish pens, as PM promised
Alliance of Indigenous, commercial and sports fishers ask Prime Minister to keep a promise to transition away from the pens by 2025. Gordon McIntyre reports (Vancouver Sun)

Extra-low (and high) tides coming to Puget Sound this week
Extra-low tides on Puget Sound May 8 to May 12 bring opportunities to witness sea stars and other colorful creatures along local shorelines. Near Seattle, the lowest tides are expected midday on Thursday and Friday. The U.S. Coast Guard warns that extra-low tides are often followed by extra-high tides. Sea level is expected to yo-yo as much as 17 feet this week near Olympia. John Ryan reports. (KUOW)

Deadline set for decision on North Cascades bird
The Center for Biological Diversity announced April 25 that it has reached an agreement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over a deadline for the Endangered Species Act listing of a rare bird found in the North Cascades. The Mount Rainier white-tailed ptarmigan is a plump white and brown bird in the grouse family...As part of the April 25 agreement with the Center, the Fish and Wildlife Service agreed to make a decision whether or not to list the Mount Rainier ptarmigan subspecies by June 26. Emma Fletcher-Frazer reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Community mourns thousands of fish lost as B.C. drought risk looms again
Scientists and others like Shepherd worry that climate change and the threat of another year of drought could have further dire consequences for populations of salmon, trout and other fish in B.C. Nono Shen reports. (Canadian Press)

One Great Shot: Curious Creature in the Kelp
A photographer diving off the coast of British Columbia captures an encounter with an inquisitive octopus. Bennett Whitnell reports. (Hakai Magazine)

Have you read the Salish Current? 
Independent, fact based news for Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties. Community supported, free from ads. Read the latest weekly newsletter here.


Here's your tug weather—
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  205 AM PDT Thu May 9 2024    
TODAY
 E wind to 10 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 4 ft at 10 seconds.  
TONIGHT
 NW wind to 10 kt becoming E after midnight. Wind waves  1 to 2 ft. W swell 4 ft at 10 seconds.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. It is included as a daily feature in the Salish Current newsletter. Click here to subscribe. Questions? Email mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.



Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate



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