Friday, July 29, 2022

7/29 Deer tick, Richmond restoration, derelict vessel removal, GasLink cost, heat on birds, Cathlamet crash

Deer tick
[Scott Bauer/Ag Research Service]


Deer tick Ixodes scapularis
The deer tick or black-legged tick is a vector for several diseases of animals, including humans (Lyme disease, babesiosis, anaplasmosis, Powassan virus disease, etc.) and is known as the deer tick owing to its habit of parasitizing the white-tailed deer. It is also known to parasitize mice, lizards, and  migratory birds, especially while the tick is in the larval or nymphal stage. (Wikipedia)

Richmond $61M biosolids facility will help reclaim bird habitat
Lands and lagoons previously used at the Iona Island Wastewater Treatment Plant will be turned into ecological restoration projects. Valerie Leung reports. (Richmond News)

B.C. cleaning up 30 derelict vessels, 1,000 km of shoreline
Richmond-based non-profit Ocean Legacy Foundation will clear 400 kilometres of shoreline debris from North Vancouver Island to the south coast of the Sea to Sky region. Nono Shen reports. (Times Colonist)

Cost of Coastal GasLink pipeline leaps 70% to $11.2B as TC Energy settles dispute
The projected cost of the contentious Coastal GasLink pipeline spanning northern British Columbia has jumped 70 per cent to $11.2 billion in the wake of a freshly inked deal between operator TC Energy Corp. and the group building a liquified natural gas terminal on the West Coast. (Canadian Press)

Extreme heat a strain for birds already burdened by habitat loss
Habitat conservation and action on climate change are needed to lessen the threat to at-risk species. Ainslie Cruickshank reports. (The Narwhal)

Ferry crashes into West Seattle dock, disrupting service to Vashon Island
The MV Cathlamet crashed into the Fauntleroy ferry dock yesterday morning causing significant damage to the vessel and the ferry dock structure. (KUOW)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 7/29/22: Tiger, nix 'Audubon,' Terry Williams, Northern giant hornet, AK water warming, pathogens on plastic, pervasive plastic, bird heat strain


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  244 AM PDT Fri Jul 29 2022   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 3 ft at 9 seconds. Areas of dense  fog. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell  3 ft at 9 seconds. Areas of dense fog. 
SAT
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW in the afternoon. Wind waves  1 ft or less. W swell 4 ft at 8 seconds. Areas of dense fog. 
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. NW swell 4 ft at 8 seconds. 
SUN
 Light wind. Wind waves less than 1 ft. NW swell 5 ft at  8 seconds.  SUN NIGHT 


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Thursday, July 28, 2022

7/28 Cat flea, heat warnings, shellfish heat, microplastics, offshore wind turbines

Cat flea [U of Florida]


Cat flea Ctenocephalides felis
The cat flea is an extremely common parasitic insect whose principal host is the domestic cat, although a high proportion of the fleas found on dogs also belong to this species. This is despite the widespread existence of a separate and well-established "dog" flea, Ctenocephalides canis. (Wikipedia)

Heat warnings cover most of B.C. as records set and risk of heat stress rises  (CBC) Excessive heat warning remains in effect through Saturday (KUOW)

Low tides go out a bit earlier amid heat wave, endangering fewer shellfish
Some potentially welcome news for shellfish and their fans: While Puget Sound is having fairly low tides this week, exposing tidepool life to extreme heat, they're mostly morning lows — before the worst heat of the day — at least in Seattle and central Puget Sound. Low tides are predicted between about 10:15 a.m. and noon this week in Seattle, according to tidal forecasts by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In south Puget Sound, the tides will go out about an hour later, as late as a 1:07 p.m. low tide on Friday in Olympia. John Ryan reports. (KUOW)

From mountaintops to ocean bottoms, scientists are discovering just how pervasive plastic is
With a rising interest in microplastics research over the last decade, scientists are starting to understand where those pollutants come from, which can help guide decision-making and inform policy change. Samantha Wohlfeil reports. (Investigate West)

Offshore Wind’s Turbulent Future
The realization that turbulence created by deepwater wind turbines could upset the spring phytoplankton bloom has researchers warning the rapidly emerging industry to proceed with caution. Doug Johnson reports. (Hakai Magazine)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  240 AM PDT Thu Jul 28 2022   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 3 ft at 9 seconds. Areas of  dense fog in the morning. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell  2 ft at 10 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Wednesday, July 27, 2022

7/27 Blue dasher, wildfire smoke, Rock Bay land, BC ferries, Storm Petrel, Swiftsure, gray whale, pathogens on plastic

Blue dasher [Lea Maimone/WikiCommons]

 

Blue dasher Pachydiplax longipennis
The blue dasher  is a dragonfly of the skimmer family. It is the only species in the genus Pachydiplax. It is very common and widely distributed through North America and into the Bahamas, and is found in many types of habitats of some kind of body of water, like a stream, river, or lake. (Wikipedia)

Wildfire smoke drifting into Western Washington from Canada amid heat wave
If a heat wave wasn't enough, here's another good reason to try to stay indoors today — smoke from a wildfire in British Columbia is now drifting south toward parts of Western Washington. The smoke is already drifting into Whatcom County, but Canadian forecasters say some smoke could reach as far south as Olympia by this evening. john Ryan reports. (KUOW)

Air quality advisory issued for eastern Metro Vancouver and Fraser Valley
Metro Vancouver says ground-level ozone concentrations are expected to remain high for several days (CBC)

First Nations officially take over B.C. Hydro lands in Rock Bay
The chiefs of the Songhees and Esquimalt First Nations made official the purchase of 4.5 acres of their traditional lands in Rock Bay from B.C. Hydro on Tuesday, a land sale decades in the making. It started with conversations the chiefs’ late uncles, former Songhees chief Robert Sam and former Esquimalt chief Andy Thomas, had with B.C. Hydro years ago. Andrew Duffy reports. (Times Colonist)

Gulf Islands ferry cancellations linked to lack of affordable housing for ferry workers
Officials on Salt Spring Island and Quadra Island are concerned about ferry service, with each pointing out the need for affordable housing for ferry crew members. Carla Wilson reports. (Times Colonist)

NOAA christens newest research vessel
A year after it was delivered to the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, the 52-foot RV Storm Petrel was christened at the La Push Marina. The Storm Petrel replaces the 38-foot RV Tatoosh, which the sanctuary acquired in 1994. It was designed by Teknicraft in New Zealand and built by All American Marine in Bellingham. Brian Gawley reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Puget Sound Express launches new 149-seat whale-watching vessel
Whale-watching company Puget Sound Express has launched a new, custom-designed vessel – the M.V. Swiftsure – that will operate out of its Edmonds location. Designed by Teknicraft and built by All American Marine, Inc. in Bellingham, the larger 77-foot Swiftsure was modeled after M.V. Saratoga, which was launched in spring 2018. (MyEdmondsNews)

Scientists: Gray whale spotted at Mukilteo waterfront was a newcomer
The whale has lingered around Possession Sound. It’s unclear if it will join a group of regular visitors known as the Sounders. Ellen Dennis reports.

Human Pathogens Are Hitching a Ride on Floating Plastic
Studies show that various human pathogens cling to microplastics in seawater. Michael Allen reports. (Hakai Magazine)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  235 AM PDT Wed Jul 27 2022   
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming NW 10 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 4 ft at 9 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 3 ft at 9 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Tuesday, July 26, 2022

7/26 Bumble bee, giant hornet, AK salmon, young lamprey

Golden northern bumble bee [WikiCommons]

 
Golden northern bumble bee Bombus fervidus
The golden northern bumble bee or yellow bumblebee is a species of bumblebee native to North America. It has a yellow-colored abdomen and thorax. Its range includes the North American continent, excluding much of the southern United States, Alaska, and the northern parts of Canada. (Wikipedia)

'Murder hornets' officially named Northern giant hornet
Asian giant hornets, commonly referred to as "murder hornets," officially have a new common name: the Northern giant hornet.  The scientific name, Vespa mandarinia, remains unchanged, but the new common name will be adopted this month. Julia Lerner report. (CDN)

As waters warm, Alaska experiences salmon booms and busts
Chaotic salmon returns leave some Alaskans with an abundance of salmon, and others with none. Victoria Petersen reports. (High County News)

Scientists use tiny tags to learn how young lamprey travel through dams
Lampreys aren’t doing well, and scientists don’t know exactly why. But they do know lamprey have struggled getting around large concrete dams in the Pacific Northwest. Courtney Flatt reports. (NW News Network)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  241 AM PDT Tue Jul 26 2022   
TODAY
 E wind to 10 kt becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 4 ft at 9 seconds. TONIGHT  W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell  4 ft at 9 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Monday, July 25, 2022

7/25 Lorquin's admiral, heat watch, BC ferries, Terry Williams, Seattle Audubon, Big Oil lawsuit, Happy Birthday Deception Pass

 Lorquin's admiral [Amy Nelson]


Lorquin's admiral Limenitis lorquini
Lorquin's admiral is a butterfly in the Nymphalinae subfamily. The butterfly is named after Pierre Joseph Michel Lorquin, a French naturalist who came to California from France during the Gold Rush, and made important discoveries on the natural history of the terrain. The Lorquin's admiral can mostly be found across the Upper Sonoran to the Canadian Zone, east to western Montana and Idaho. Known areas include southern British Columbia (including Vancouver Island, north of Emerald Lake), and Cypress Hills in southwestern Saskatchewan as well as southwestern Alberta. The butterfly resides mostly in forest edges, mountain canyons, parks, streamsides, fencerows, orchards, and groves of cottonwood and poplar. Usually the butterflies feed on California buckeye, yerba santa, privet, bird droppings, and dung. They are extremely territorial and will attack any intruders into their habitat, including large birds.(Wikipedia)

Excessive Heat Watch: heatwave to impact Washington this week
Monday will largely see temperatures in the 80s for the Puget Sound lowlands away from water, with coastal areas staying a touch cooler, but the typically warmer spots in Mason, Lewis, Thurston, Pierce, and King counties could see an isolated 90-degree reading. Most of the Puget Sound lowlands from Seattle south will see temperatures in the 90s from Tuesday through Friday. (KING)

B.C. Ferries fires president and CEO after 173 cancelled sailings in 28 days
After a tumultuous few years marked by staffing challenges, sailing cancellations and pandemic losses, B.C. Ferries has fired its president and CEO, Mark Collins. The corporation announced the decision in a statement on Friday. Collins led the company since 2017. (CBC) Staffing shortage forces B.C. Ferries to cancel evening sailings to and from Salt Spring Island  (CBC)

Terry Williams, Tulalip’s ‘champion of climate issues,’ dies at 74
The bolo tie-wearing elder shaped state and national environmental policy. He was both soft-spoken and a powerful advocate. Isabella Breda reports. (Everett Herald)

Seattle chapter of the Audubon Society dropping "Audubon" from its name to be more inclusive
The Seattle chapter of the Audubon Society announced that it is dropping "Audubon" from its name because of its association with white supremacy. There are hundreds of state and local chapters of the National Audubon Society, the nonprofit dedicated to protecting birds and their habitats, but Seattle Audubon is one of the largest in the country. Earlier this month, the board voted to change the chapter’s name because the man the organization is named after – illustrator, painter and bird lover John James Audubon, author of the seminal work "The Birds of America" – owned enslaved people and opposed abolition. Lilly Ana Fowler reports. (KNKX)

Vancouver’s Big Oil Lawsuit, Explained
Companies such as ExxonMobil — which owns the Canadian oil sands producer Imperial Oil —are being singled out because they privately researched climate change decades before it was a mainstream issue and determined that burning fossil fuels creates grave global threats, according to extensive documentation surfaced by researchers and journalists. But instead of acting on that life-saving information, Exxon and others then ran media campaigns throughout the 1990s and 2000s — crucial decades for getting the climate emergency under control — to convince the public that human-induced warming isn’t real. It’s an alleged disinformation campaign that continues to this day.  Geoff Dembick reports. (The Tyee)

Deception Pass State Park celebrates 100 years
Deception Pass State Park celebrated its 100th anniversary Saturday with a community picnic at East Cranberry Lake...Thousands of people came to the park on Saturday for Deception Pass’ busiest day of the year. The most visited state park in Washington, Deception Pass welcomes more than 3 million visitors a year who enjoy camping, hiking, kayaking and sightseeing. Oliver Hamlin reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  216 AM PDT Mon Jul 25 2022   
TODAY
 Light wind becoming NW to 10 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 1 ft or less. W swell 4 ft at 8 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. W swell 4 ft  at 8 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 22, 2022

7/22 Nootka rose, WA trust lands, Intalco restart, spirit bear, low oxygen, BC caribou, Webb telescope, week in review

Nootka Rose [Native Plants Pacific NW]


Nootka Rose Rosa nutkana
Nutkana is derived from Nootka; Nootka Sound is a waterway on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia that was named after the Nuu-Chah-Nulth tribe that live in the area.  Nootka Rose is sometimes called Common, Wild, or Bristly Rose.  There are four recognized varieties whose names suggest differences in bristling. (Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest)

WA Supreme Court rules on multiple benefits of trust lands
The Washington state Supreme Court on Thursday ruled the Department of Natural Resources can continue to manage state trust lands for the financial benefit of schools and other institutions, but can also look at other ways to ensure that such lands are managed to benefit all residents. In a unanimous decision, the justices decided that while the present system was legal, there were additional uses of trust lands to benefit the public. Nicholas K. Geranios reports. (Associated Press)

Intalco restart: can ‘green’ aluminum get ‘clean’ power?
Options for a clean-power source are narrowing for a buyout firm with a sustainability ethos that wants to restart and upgrade the Intalco aluminum plant near Ferndale. Eric Scigliano reports. (Salish Current)

B.C. government, First Nations ban hunting to protect spirit bear
Scientists and First Nations hope a ban on killing black bears will protect the gene that codes for the existence of the spirit bear, the rarest subspecies in the world. Stefan Labbé reports. (Times Colonist)

Low-oxygen problems to be scrutinized in talks about research, modeling efforts
For decades, researchers have been advancing their understanding of what causes the harmful and sometimes deadly low-oxygen problems afflicting some areas of Puget Sound. Computer models have been developed to replicate conditions and point the way to possible solutions. Experts generally agree that excess nitrogen flowing into Puget Sound contributes to the low-oxygen conditions. Chris Dunagan reports. (Puget Sound Institute)

Fighting to protect B.C.’s northern caribou before they ‘disappear in front of our eyes’
Why wait until caribou herds are on the verge of collapse to protect them? Researchers say we should act now to conserve northern B.C. habitat. Ainslie Cruickshank reports. (The Narwhal)

The new science coming from the James Webb telescope has astronomers
In the week since the first images from the James Webb Space Telescope were unveiled, astronomers have been poring through all the observations it's made so far — and they're happily overwhelmed. Nell Greenfieldboyce reports. (NPR)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 7/22/22: Spooner, natural gas, sea gardens, Atlas Network, climate clock, Canadian oceans, Tribes for Puget Sound, "Big Oil" fight, Springer's 20th, WA forest logging, 'green' aluminum 'clean' power, spirit bear 


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  243 AM PDT Fri Jul 22 2022   
TODAY
 SW wind to 10 kt becoming W 10 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 5 ft at 7 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 5 ft at 6 seconds. 
SAT
 NE wind to 10 kt becoming NW 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 5 ft at 7 seconds. 
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SW to 10 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 6 ft at 7 seconds. SUN  Light wind becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 8 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Thursday, July 21, 2022

7/21 Currant, fight 'Big Oil,' cooling off, Springer's 20th

Red-flowering Currant
[Tim Hagen/WA Native Plant Society]

 

Red-flowering Currant Ribes sanguineum
The name sanguineum means 'blood-red' or 'bloody'— rather violent epithets to apply to the beautiful reddish-pink flowers, which are harbingers of spring and hummingbirds. This shrub was introduced to European horticulture by plant-hunter David Douglas. (Plants of the NW Pacific Coast)

Vancouver council agrees to spend up to $660,000 to fight 'Big Oil' in court
Vancouver mayor Kennedy Stewart breaks tie with vote in favour of fighting the world's five largest oil and gas companies to help cover climate-change related costs. David Carrigg reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Bacteria, sharks, man o' wars: Why Canadians can't find a place to cool off in the sweltering heat
Temperatures are creeping above 30C— but E. Coli, high bacteria due to wastewater and even algae are making it hard for some to beat the heat. Courtney Greenberg reports. (Vancouver Sun)

North Island event celebrates 20 years since Springer reunited with pod
Springer, the orca orphan returned to her pod in a dramatic rescue two decades ago, is being celebrated this week as an example of what humans can do when they co-operate. Springer, also known as A73 and a member of the northern resident killer whales, was just two when she was discovered in early 2002, separated from her pod and alone after losing her mother. She was severely undernourished and starting to bond with humans.Darron Kloster reports. (Times Colonist)


Now, your tug weather--West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  255 AM PDT Thu Jul 21 2022   
TODAY
 NW wind to 10 kt rising to 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 4 ft at 9 seconds. Patchy fog. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt easing to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 5 ft at 8 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Wednesday, July 20, 2022

7/20 Snowbrush, WA tribes, Skagit farmlands, ocean protections, flood mitigation, Everett Herald union, kelp forests

Snowbrush {Native Plants PNW]


Snowbrush Ceanothus velutinus
Ceanothus is a Greek name for a spiny shrub.  Velutinus means soft and velvety, referring to short, dense, silky hairs on the undersides of the leaves.  This feature is more pronounced on shrubs found in drier areas east of the Cascades.  When in bloom, it is covered with clusters of tiny white flowers, hence the name “Snowbrush.”  It is also commonly known as Tobacco Brush or Red Root; other common names: Cinnamon Brush, Sticky Laurel, Shiny-leaf Ceanothus, and Mountain Balm allude to its sticky, scented leaves.  Although it is also sometimes called Deerbrush, that name is more often applied to the related species, C. integerrimus.

Washington tribes to get $50M to restore Puget Sound
Tribes in Western Washington will receive $50 million in federal funding from the infrastructure bill, effectively doubling support for restoration and protection of Puget Sound. The Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday in Sequim that it will give the money over the next five years to the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, which supports 20 treaty tribes. Previously, the EPA provided the commission with $50 million over 10 years to support habitat restoration, infrastructure updates, water quality, commercial fisheries, flood protection and climate resiliency. Nicholas Turner reports. (Seattle Times)

Skagit County moves to protect farmland in fish habitat debate
Skagit County on Monday approved a six-month moratorium on certain salmon habitat projects in an attempt to counter Seattle City Light as it works to relicense its dam operations on the Skagit River. Converting agricultural land in the Skagit River delta to salmon habitat is on the rise, but puts at risk a core Skagit County industry if it isn’t done carefully, according to Will Honea, a lawyer with the county handling natural resources issues. “If you lose enough farmland, you lose farming,” he said Monday to the county commissioners ahead of their unanimous 3-0 vote approving the moratorium. Honea said the moratorium was spurred by the county’s concerns that Seattle City Light will propose such offsite mitigation as compensation for the environmental impacts of its Skagit River dams 70 miles away, as it pursues a license to continue operating these facilities. Brandon Stone reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Trudeau announces expanded oceans protection plan
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced new details of the federal government's $3.5-billion plan to protect the oceans and boost coast guard facilities on the world's longest national coastline. In its most recent budget, the government pledged to add $2 billion over nine years to the $1.5 billion already set aside for ocean protection. (Canadian Press)

Ottawa, B.C. deliver $81.5 million for funding for flood mitigation
The program is meant to help communities protect people, homes and infrastructure from floods and related hazards such as landslides. Gordon Hoekstra reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Everett Daily Herald staff forms union, asks for fair pay and working conditions
The Everett Herald newspaper journalists have announced they plan to organize a union. They're asking Sound Publishing, the Herald's owner, to voluntarily recognize their union in lieu of holding a vote through federal labor regulators. A news release from the Everett NewsGuild says about 95% of the Herald's eligible newsroom employees have signed cards in favor of unionizing. According to the guild's Twitter account, the union represents 23 staff members, including reporters, photographers, page designers, and web producers. Paige Browning reports. (KUOW)

How Urchins and the Blob Tag Teamed Kelp Forests
From 2013 to 2016, the Blob derailed the ecosystem in the northeast Pacific. Years later, scientists are still uncovering new consequences wrought by this extreme heatwave. Michael Allen reports. (Hakai Magazine)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  244 AM PDT Wed Jul 20 2022   
TODAY
 NW wind to 10 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 5 ft at 10 seconds. Areas of  dense fog. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell  5 ft at 10 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Real journalism. Local. Powerful.

 

Tuesday, July 19, 2022

7/19 Ocean Spray, climate change, ferry crew shortage, WA voter poll

Ocean Spray [Native Plants PNW]

Ocean Spray Holodiscus discolor
Holodiscus means entire disc, referring to the unlobed disc lining the hypanthium (in the rose family, the hypanthium is an enlarged cup or rim that supports the sepals, petals and stamens).  Discolor means two-colored; the leaves are green on the upper surface, paler beneath.  It is also known as Creambush, Creambush Rock Spirea or Ironwood.  Both Oceanspray and Creambush refer to its cascading, creamy-white flower clusters.  It is called Ironwood due to the strength of its wood. (Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest)

The U.S. plan to avoid extreme climate change is running out of time
In 101 months, the United States will have achieved President Biden’s most important climate promise — or it will have fallen short. Right now it is seriously falling short, and for each month that passes, it becomes harder to succeed until at some point — perhaps very soon — it will become virtually impossible. That’s true for the United States, and also true for the planet, as nearly 200 nations strive to tackle climate change with a fast-dwindling timeline for doing so. Chris Mooney and Harry Stevens report. (Washington Post)

Crew shortages persist for both B.C. Ferries and Washington State Ferries
As crew shortages force B.C. Ferries to cancel sailings during the peak summer season, the same problem is afflicting Washington State Ferries across the border. In B.C., sailings have been cancelled, sometimes at short notice, when crew numbers fall below levels set by Transport Canada, while Washington State Ferries has been forced to adopt a scaled-back schedule on most routes to deal with lower staff numbers while meeting requirements, set by the U.S. Coast Guard. Carla Wilson reports. (Times Colonist)

Poll: Inflation, cost of living top of mind for WA voters
One third of the state's residents are most concerned about the economy in the upcoming election, a new Crosscut/Elway poll  found. Josh Cohen reports. (Crosscut)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  213 AM PDT Tue Jul 19 2022   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 2 ft at 19 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt easing to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft subsiding to 1 ft or less after midnight. W  swell 1 ft at 8 seconds building to 3 ft at 10 seconds after  midnight.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Monday, July 18, 2022

7/18 Spiraea, Atlas Network, mud snails, endangered plants, heat pumps, devil's club, sea gardens

Douglas Spiraea [Native Plants]  

           
Douglas spiraea Spiraea douglasii Hook.
The word Spiraea comes from a Greek plant that was commonly used for garlands.  Douglas Spiraea is named after David Douglas.  It is also commonly known as Hardhack, Steeplebush, or as Western, Pink or Rose Spiraea.  There are two recognized varieties, var. douglasii, which has grayish wooly hairs on the undersides of its leaves; and var. menziesii, (sometimes known as S. menziesii) which has smooth or only slightly hairy leaves. (Native Plants of the Pacific NW)

How a conservative U.S. network undermined Indigenous energy rights in Canada
A U.S.-based libertarian coalition has spent years pressuring the Canadian government to limit how much Indigenous communities can push back on energy development on their own land, newly reviewed strategy documents reveal. The Atlas Network partnered with an Ottawa-based think tank — the Macdonald-Laurier Institute — which enlisted pro-industry Indigenous representatives in its campaign to provide “a shield against opponents.” Geoff Dembicki reports. (The Narwhal)

Billions of mud snails in Padilla Bay
The Japanese mud snail arrived on the West Coast in the 1930s after hitchhiking on Pacific oysters transported from Japan to save the oyster industry, which was collapsing from pollution and overharvesting. Now, as many as 15 billion Japanese mud snails cover the shorelines of Padilla Bay.Benjamin Leung reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Endangered plants being 'trampled into extinction' at Oak Bay's Cattle Point
Jacques Sirois kneels on the bank of a Garry oak maritime meadow at Cattle Point in Uplands Park, gently pulling aside some vegetation to reveal a flowering plant called tall woolly-heads — Psilocarphus elatior. While it is an endangered plant, what is rarer still is that it has not been trampled by the sheer number of people who have visited the park since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. “The park is just being loved to death,” said Sirois, a biologist and naturalist. Pedro Arrais reports. (Times Colonist)

Climate change prompts a push away from natural gas
What's an effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions? Heat pumps, advocate say. And new building codes could require them. Julie Titone reports. (Everett Herald)

In search of devil's club, a prickly shrub long used as medicine by Northwest tribes
Deep in the forests of the northwest, a peculiar shrub with palm-like leaves and stingers on its spines holds within it medicines that have been used by local tribes for thousands of years. Azure BourĂ© is specially trained to pierce the prickly defenses of devil's club, peeling the outer layers of its stems to find a remedy inside that's been used to treat everything from arthritis to indigestion.  Josh Farley reports. (Kitsap Sun)

How Indigenous Sea Gardens Produced Massive Amounts of Food for Millennia
By focusing on reciprocity and the common good—both for the community and the environment—sea gardening created bountiful food without putting populations at risk of collapse. Ashley Braun reports. (Hakai Magazine)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  216 AM PDT Mon Jul 18 2022   
TODAY
 Light wind becoming W 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves less than 1 ft becoming 2 ft or less in the afternoon. W  swell 4 ft at 7 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell  2 ft at 15 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Friday, July 15, 2022

7/15 Newt, BC prosecution, Gabriola gardens, Snake R dams, pine demise, week in review

Rough-skinned newt [Burke Museum]

 
Rough-skinned newt Taricha granulosa
The eggs and the skin of larvae and adults contain a powerful neurological poison, tetrodotoxin, which protects them from predators. When disturbed, the poison is released from glands as a milky white substance. Humans should avoid hand-to-mouth contact after handling a newt. (Wikipedia)

A ‘revolt’ against the court may be why B.C. is prosecuting 19 arrested on Wet’suwet’en territory
Defence lawyers say the province’s decision to pursue criminal contempt charges against land defenders opposed to the Coastal GasLink pipeline could be tied to concerns that the integrity of the court is at risk. Matt Simmons reports. (The Narwhal)

‘Wildlife-friendly gardens’ popping up on Gabriola Island
Islands Trust Conservancy supports Gabriola Land and Trails Trust’s stewardship efforts. (Nanaimo News)

Advocates show support for removal of Snake River dams
On Thursday, Tribal members and advocates with the Salmon Orca Project met with federal officials, calling for the removal of the Snake River dams. They held a series of speeches, songs and dances as they called on Congress to act...However, groups such as Northwest RiverPartners are pushing back, saying the data doesn't show that removing the dams would necessarily recover salmon. The group, which represents community-owned electric utilities and clean energy agencies, says the hydropower produced is essential to fighting climate change. (KING)

The world’s longest-lived trees couldn’t survive climate change
After outlasting millennia of disruptions and disaster, human-caused climate change is proving too much for bristlecone pines to bear. Sarah Kaplan reports. (Washington Post)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 7/15/22: Orange chicken, First Foods, K45, green crab whiskey, BC sea life, SCOTUS tribal ruling, Snake R dams, big-tree hunter, BC prosecution


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  245 AM PDT Fri Jul 15 2022   
TODAY
 SE wind to 10 kt rising to 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 4 ft at 9 seconds. A chance of  showers in the morning then showers likely in the afternoon. 
TONIGHT
 SW wind 5 to 15 kt in the evening becoming light. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 4 ft at 9 seconds. A chance of  showers in the evening then a slight chance of showers after  midnight. 
SAT
 Light wind becoming W 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 4 ft at 10 seconds. A slight chance  of showers in the morning. 
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 4 ft at 10 seconds. 
SUN
 W wind to 10 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 3 ft at 9 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Thursday, July 14, 2022

7/14 Sato's whale, low tide, Daajing Giids, Grieg Seafood, bit-tree hunter, P.A. jetty, Springer!

Sato’s beaked whales [Chika Sugita/Hakai Magazine]

Scientists Had Never Seen This Elusive Whale Alive—Until Now With DNA evidence, scientists confirm the first live sighting of the Sato’s beaked whale, which they previously knew only from whalers’ reports and carcasses. Devon Bidal reports. (Hakai Magazine)

Beachcombers get to explore B.C.'s lowest tides in a decade
The lowest tides in about a decade will grace B.C.'s South Coast on Thursday, with a combination of natural factors creating the perfect situation for combing the beach for creatures and treasures.  Low tide is expected to hit just after noon in Vancouver, and just before noon in White Rock, a municipality south of Vancouver near the U.S. border. The lowest tides in Victoria are expected at about 9:30 a.m. and 8:45 p.m. PT. Courtney Dickson reports. (CBC)

Haida Gwaii village officially restores ancestral name
A village in B.C.'s Haida Gwaii archipelago has had its ancestral name restored effective immediately — the first in the province to do so, according to the province. The village, formerly known as the Village of Queen Charlotte, will henceforth be known as Daajing Giids, pronounced "daw-jean geeds." Dickson reports. (CBC)

New technology allows hatchery to retain fish longer before release into ocean
The first transfer of juvenile Atlantic salmon has been made to Grieg Seafood B.C. Ltd.’s Gold River Hatchery Expansion Project, which was completed this spring. Grieg Seafood B.C. is part of the Norwegian multinational Grieg Group and operates 22 fish farms in the province. One of the largest salmon-farming companies in B.C., Grieg is aiming to harvest 22,000 metric tonnes of fish in 2022. The new facility will nearly double the smolt capacity at Grieg’s hatchery and the advanced technology will allow the company to explore retaining fish in the hatchery for longer. Melissa Renwick reports. (Ha-Shilth-Sa/Times Colonist)

A Day in the Life of a Big-Tree Hunter
On the afternoon of June 19 in the foggy depths of old-growth forest, Colin Spratt finally found what he was looking for: a 2,000 year-old western red cedar. The north shore giant stood in a clearing in the remote reaches of Lynn Headwaters Regional Park. The 5.8 metre-thick base of the tree was hollow; its labyrinth of roots, each one wider than a human body, extended outwards and into the surrounding earth. Kate Helmore reports. (The Tyee)

Port of Port Townsend approves jetty project
The Port of Port Townsend commissioners unanimously approved a construction contract Wednesday for improvements to the Port Hudson breakwater jetty after learning federal grant money had been approved. Capital Projects Director Matt Klontz told the commission the port had received a low bid from Orion Marine Contractors, Inc. of roughly $10.2 million, well below the engineer’s estimate of $14.3 million. Peter Segall reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Celebrate Springer at West Seattle Summerfest!
Celebrate with The Whale Trail the 20th anniversary of Springer's rescue at the SummerFest from July 14, 5-8 p.m. at the West Seattle Junction through July 17. Kids can get an orca-themed passport and visit local stores to spot hidden orcas, check them off their list and bring them back to The Whale Trail for orca-themed rewards. Orca Rescue! Presentations on July 16 and 17 from 3-6 p.m. at the West Seattle Senior Center feature talks about Springer. More information here. https://thewhaletrail.org/connect/events/#event=72519439;instance=20220714170000?popup=1


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  256 AM PDT Thu Jul 14 2022   
TODAY
 NW wind to 10 kt rising to 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the afternoon. W  swell 3 ft at 9 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SW to 10 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft subsiding to 1 ft or less after  midnight. W swell 3 ft at 11 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Wednesday, July 13, 2022

7/13 Ceratium, Snake R dam breaching, Webb views, Pulling Together, coastal climate grants

Ceratium [Brittanica]

Ceratium
Genus of single-celled aquatic dinoflagellate algae (family Ceratiaceae) common in fresh water and salt water from the Arctic to the tropics. As dinoflagellates, the organisms have two unlike flagella and have both plant and animal characteristics; their taxonomic placement as algae is contentious. Members of the genus form an important part of the plankton found in temperate-zone seas, and several are known to cause red tides and water blooms. (Brittanica)

White House weighs in on Lower Snake River dam breaching in unusual power play 
The Biden administration released two reports finding dam removal is needed on the Lower Snake to recover salmon to fishable levels in the Columbia and Snake rivers and that replacing the energy produced by the Lower Snake River dams is feasible. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

Baby stars, dancing galaxies: NASA shows new cosmic views
A sparkling landscape of baby stars. A foamy blue and orange view of a dying star. Five galaxies in a cosmic dance. The splendors of the universe glowed in a new batch of images released Tuesday from NASA’s powerful new telescope. Seth Borenstein reports. (Associated Press)

Pulling Together: An eight-day Shuswap canoe journey drawing in Indigenous, law enforcement and public service communities
It was hot — boy, was it hot — but also a perfect day on Tuesday for more than 400 people in 25 canoes to push off from Enderby River Beach and begin an eight-day paddle to Green Lake. The journey is called Pulling Together, a chance for Indigenous peoples and public agents that have historically oppressed their rights to their own language and culture — police, armed forces, child welfare officials — to pursue a shared goal and get to know one another during a canoe journey through the Shuswap. Gordon McIntyre reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Federal grants available for coastal climate change projects
Coastal communities in the state that are threatened by climate change are eligible for $225 million in federal grants. Cities, counties and tribes can apply for coastal resilience projects under the Climate Ready Coasts initiative. The funding is through the $2.855 billion set aside for salmon habitat recovery and coastal resilience in the Biden-Harris Infrastructure Law. (Peninsula Daily News)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  252 AM PDT Wed Jul 13 2022   
TODAY
 NW wind to 10 kt rising to 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the afternoon. W  swell 6 ft at 9 seconds subsiding to 4 ft at 7 seconds in the  afternoon. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 4 ft at 12 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Tuesday, July 12, 2022

7/12 SMACS 0723, SCOTUS tribe decision, Indigenous marine protection, BC sea life, drinking green crabs, Celebrate Springer

SMACS 0723, 4.6 billion years ago [NASA]

 

NASA’s Webb Delivers Deepest Infrared Image of Universe Yet NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has produced the deepest and sharpest infrared image of the distant universe to date. Known as Webb’s First Deep Field, this image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 is overflowing with detail. Thousands of galaxies – including the faintest objects ever observed in the infrared – have appeared in Webb’s view for the first time. This slice of the vast universe covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on the ground. The image shows the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 as it appeared 4.6 billion years ago. (NASA)

Supreme Court threw a ‘punch to the gut,’ PNW Native leaders say
Native leaders and Indigenous rights lawyers in the Puget Sound region and beyond are raising the alarm about a recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, saying it threatens tribal sovereignty with regard to criminal prosecutions and beyond. Some local tribes are still digesting the June 29 ruling that deals with state power over Native lands, while others are calling it a blow to centuries of legal history and tradition. Daniel Beekman and Omar Shaikh Rashad report. (Seattle Times)

From Nunavut to B.C.'s North Coast, Indigenous knowledge leads the way in marine protection
Canada's marine environments are increasingly threatened by pressures such as plastic pollution, biodiversity loss and climate change. But across the country, Indigenous stewards, scientists and environmental advocates are trying to help protect the health of the oceans. Connel Bradwell reports. (CBC)

B.C.’s sea life is bouncing back, slowly, after the 2021 heat dome
Barnacles are making a return, but one scientist says his early estimation that a billion creatures died from record-high temperatures was too low. Ainslie Cruickshank reports. (The Narwhal)

A distillery is fighting invasive crabs by turning them into whiskey
They're small. They're green. They're crustaceans. And now, they're in whiskey...Tamworth Distilling's Crab Trapper whiskey gets some of its flavor from green crabs caught off the coast of New Hampshire. Kai McNamee reports. (NPR)

Celebrate Springer at West Seattle Summerfest!
Celebrate with The Whale Trail the 20th anniversary of Springer's rescue at the SummerFest from July 14, 5-8 p.m. at the West Seattle Junction through July 17. Kids can get an orca-themed passport and visit local stores to spot hidden orcas, check them off their list and bring them back to The Whale Trail for orca-themed rewards. Orca Rescue! Presentations on July 16 and 17 from 3-6 p.m. at the West Seattle Senior Center feature talks about Springer. More information here.


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  240 AM PDT Tue Jul 12 2022   
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT
  
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 15 kt rising to 15 to 25 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 2 ft or less building to 2 to 4 ft in the  afternoon. W swell 6 ft at 12 seconds. Patchy fog in the morning. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 25 kt easing to 10 to 20 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. W swell 4 ft at 12 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Monday, July 11, 2022

7/11 Nightshade, K45, deep dive, first foods, climate engineering, urban tree canopy

Bittersweet nightshade (King County)

Bittersweet nightshade Solanum dulcamara
Bittersweet nightshade is a slender perennial vine or semi-woody shrub found throughout King County, especially in creeks and wetlands, as well as field edges, gardens, parks, and roadsides. This plant is toxic to people, pets, and livestock. Leaves are dark green to purple-tinged. Mid-May to September, produces star-shaped purple flowers with stamens fused in a prominent yellow cone. Flowers followed by round or egg-shaped berries that ripen from green, to orange, to bright red. All stages of berry can grow on same plant. Spreads by seed, as well as stem and root fragments.(King County)

Orca calf spotted off San Juan Islands, first in K-Pod since 2011
It's estimated the young calf is only a few months old, and its future is still up in the air. Video shared by the Orca Behavior Institute shows mom and baby off the shores of the San Juan Islands along the Haro Strait on Saturday. The Center for Whale Research said the two were also spotted on the west side of Vancouver Island. Kalie Greenberg reports. (KING) Researchers name newest baby orca spotted in B.C. waters  The Center for Whale Research (CWR) based in Washington state says it has dubbed the latest addition to the K pod as K45. (CBC)

Deep dive: Expedition explores deep-sea habitat never seen before
“We know more about the surface of the moon than we do the deep sea,” says Cherisse Du Preez, head of DFO’s deep-sea ecology program. A local expedition hopes to change that. Melissa Renwick reports. (Ha-Shilth-Sa/Times-Colonist)

First foods: How Native people are revitalizing the natural nourishment of the Pacific Northwest
Five or six generations ago, Native people of this region ate a complex diet that changed with the seasons. Called First Foods, these are the staples they always relied on. Today a movement in tribal communities is promoting First Foods traditions and decolonizing Native diets and taste buds to restore bodily, cultural and spiritual health. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

Podcast | Can we engineer our way out of the climate crisis?
The New Yorker's Elizabeth Kolbert says human ingenuity may offer some solutions. (Crosscut)

New tree canopy assessment provides tree-planting tools for Puget Sound region
Trees in urban areas provide a number of benefits, from shade to cleaner air. Authors of a new assessment hope Puget Sound cities and towns will keep that in mind as the region sees rapid growth. The Urban Tree Canopy Assessment provides planning resources so forest managers can better prioritize where they plant trees in central Puget Sound. Hannah Kett, urban program director for The Nature Conservancy in Washington, which led efforts on the report, said the goal of the assessment is to provide tree-planting tools for the region. (My Edmonds)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  247 AM PDT Mon Jul 11 2022   
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH
 TUESDAY AFTERNOON   
TODAY
 NW wind to 10 kt rising to 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the afternoon. W  swell 3 ft at 9 seconds. Areas of fog with vsby 1 NM or less in  the morning. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 25 kt. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. W swell 4 ft


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 8, 2022

7/8 Fennel, big quake big wave, GasLink, BC COVID, Snohomish return, Mill Cr wildlife, week in review

Fennel [David B. Williams]


Has Blackberry Met its Match?
David B. Williams in Street Smart Naturalist writes: "Recently while biking on the Burke Gilman Trail near Gas Works Park, I was struck (not physically mind you, in case you worried that I suffered a shrubbery injury) by the lush fennel along the trail. In some places, the plants formed great thickets that were dense enough to preclude the growth of another non-native invasive, Himalayan blackberry. (Actually a native of Western Europe, these blackberries arrived in our part of the world because of horticulturalist Luther Burbank.) If fennel is that aggressive, and able to replace blackberries, that could be an intriguing development, perhaps inspiring more people to use this fragrant plant..."

Earthquake would trigger 20-foot tsunami in Seattle within 3 minutes, state report says
A tsunami triggered by a major earthquake beneath Puget Sound would arrive at our shores sooner and reach farther inland than previously understood, according to a study published Thursday by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. Models showed a tsunami following a magnitude 7.5 quake would inundate Seattle’s shoreline under more than 20 feet of water, and reach parts of Bainbridge Island, Elliott Bay and Alki Point within 3 minutes. Nicholas Turner reports. (Seattle Times)

More Criminal Charges in Gas Pipeline Conflict
The Crown will proceed with criminal charges against four people arrested in November at a worksite for the Coastal GasLink pipeline project currently under construction through northern B.C. Gidimt’en Clan member Molly Wickham, Sleydo’, is among four facing criminal contempt for breaking injunction. Amanda Follett Hosgood reports. (The Tyee)

B.C. enters third Omicron wave as COVID hospitalizations jump 35% over last week
B.C.'s health minister confirmed the province is entering its third wave of the Omicron COVID-19 variant as hospitalizations jumped 35 per cent in the last week. Eva Uguen-Csenge reports. (CBC)

Canoe trip seeks to reawaken dormant Northwest tribe
The Snohomish Tribe is returning to its native land through a canoe trip across Puget Sound. On Thursday, they stopped at Langley on Whidbey Island. Erik Wilkinson reports. (KING)

Wildlife finds a new home at mitigation site near Mill Creek
Public works crews planted trees and piled up “woody debris” to mimic nature. It’s to make up for environmental impacts. Zachariah Bryan reports. (Everett Herald)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 7/8/22: Math 2.0 Friday, Saturna Is, kelp crisis, Snake R dams, Makah whale hunt, green crabs, Cayou Channel, big quake big wave


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  234 AM PDT Fri Jul 8 2022   
TODAY
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 10 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the  afternoon. W swell 2 ft at 9 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt easing to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft subsiding to 1 ft or less after midnight. W  swell 2 ft at 9 seconds. 
SAT
 W wind to 10 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 2 ft at 9 seconds. 
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SW to 10 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft subsiding to 1 ft or less after  midnight. W swell 2 ft at 9 seconds. 
SUN
 Light wind. Wind waves less than 1 ft. W swell 2 ft at  8 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Thursday, July 7, 2022

7/7 Sanddab, green crab, manure-to-energy, lasers, Cayou Channel, Meares Is totem, foraminifera, shipping containers


Pacific sanddab [WikiCommons]


Pacific sanddab Citharichthys sordidus
Sanddabs are called lefty or left-handed flounders because their right eye migrates to the left side of their body. Pacific sanddabs are common on sand below 50-ft depth and feeds inamphipods, sysidsm shrimp and worms. An important year-round sport fish from Bering Sea to Baja California. (Marine Life of Puget Sound, the San Juans, and the Strait of Georgia)

Green crabs in Hood Canal raise questions about invasion; further response is coming
The discovery of a green crab in Central Hood Canal was fairly shocking for those involved. Despite an extensive trapping effort, green crabs had never been spotted in Central or South Puget Sound, and this green crab in Hood Canal was more than 30 miles by water to the nearest confirmed sighting. Chris Dunagan writes. (Puget Sound Institute)

Cow pie power! Monroe manure-to-energy project expands
Cow manure may soon power as many as 675 homes thanks to a new partnership between the Snohomish County Public Utility District, Tulalip Tribes and Werkhoven Dairy. Qualco has been turning cow poop into electricity since 2008. A new generator could turn on by mid-August. Jacqueline Allison reports. (Everett Herald)

Lasers help WA scientists find potential landslide hazards
Eight years after the deadly Oso slide, researchers are using the LiDAR program to scan landscapes that could be dangerous. Michael Crowe reports. (High Country News/Crosscut)

State approves proposal to rename San Juan Islands channel after Indigenous leader
The proposed name, Cayou Channel, would honor one of the first Indigenous elected officials in Washington state, Henry Cayou. Adel Toay reports. (KING)

New totem pole raised on Meares Island, the first in decades
About two years ago, Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation master carver Joe Martin was asked to carve a totem pole by his brother, Nookmis. As the head of their family’s house of Ewos, Nookmis wanted it to be carved in remembrance of “the pandemic we all faced together,” Martin said. With the help of various local artists, including his daughter Gisele, Gordon Dick, Patrick Amos, Robin Rorick, Ken Easton, Robinson Cook and Nookmis, Martin began carving the totem pole on June 18, 2021. Over a year later, it was transported from the Naa’Waya’Sum Coastal Indigenous Gardens (formerly the Tofino Botanical Gardens) in Tofino to the Tla-o-qui-aht’s ancient village site on Meares Island in preparation for its raising on July 1. Melissa Renwick reports. (Ha-Shilth-Sa/Times-Colonist)

This single-celled sea critter could help scientists learn about climate change
Foraminifera, or forams for short, are a single-celled oceanic organism that could provide big answers to questions about climate change. Courtney Flatt reports. (NW News Network)

What Lurks Inside Shipping Containers
Seizure-inducing methyl bromide and carcinogenic formaldehyde are only some of the poisonous chemicals scientists found inside cargo containers. Chris Baraniuk reports. (Hakai Magazine)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  238 AM PDT Thu Jul 7 2022   
TODAY
 SW wind to 10 kt becoming NW 10 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft in the  afternoon. W swell 2 ft at 10 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 10 to 20 kt easing to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft subsiding to 1 ft or less after midnight. W  swell 2 ft at 10 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told