Thursday, September 30, 2021

9/30 Red Irish lord, Day for Truth and Reconciliation, Fairy Cr protest, BC electrification, bird protections, Coexinction

Red Irish lord [seaotter.com]


Red Irish lord Hemilepidotus hemilepidotus
Red Irish lord are common from the Bering Sea, Alaska to Washington, and are rare south to Central California. They are found in shallow rocky waters. Red Irish lord tend to rest on the bottom, blending in with their surroundings. They are found from shallow waters to depths of 450 m (1,476 ft). Red Irish lord can grow up to 51 cm (20 in) in length, and 1.11 kg (2.45 lbs) in weight. Maximum age is at least 6 years old. (WDFW)

Canada marks first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
Singing and drumming were scheduled to ring out at 2:15 p.m. from Kamloops where the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Nation announced in May that ground-penetrating radar had detected what are believed to be 215 unmarked graves at the site of one of the largest former residential schools. Brenna Owen reports. (Canadian Press)

Old growth logging protesters dig in as company prepares to appeal court's injunction denial
A decision by a British Columbia Supreme Court judge refusing to extend an injunction against old-growth logging protesters did little to release pressure in the dispute as all sides hold steadfast to their positions. Forest company Teal Cedar Products Ltd. says in a statement it intends to appeal the decision handed down by a judge on Tuesday. Luke Wallace, a spokesman for the protest group Rainforest Flying Squad, says supporters will stay put at blockade camps at Fairy Creek, a remote area north of Port Renfrew on Vancouver Island. (Canadian Press)

BC lays out $260-million, five-year plan to move away from fossil fuels
B.C. Hydro and the provincial government have announced a new five-year plan for the Crown corporation that provides incentives for people to switch from fossil fuels to electricity to power their homes, businesses and vehicles. Under the plan announced Tuesday, B.C. Hydro will spend nearly $190 million to promote fuel-switching in homes, buildings, vehicles and industry. More than $50 million will be spent to attract industries to B.C. to run their businesses and reduce their carbon footprint by using hydroelectricity. (Canadian Press)

Biden Administration Restores Bird Protections, Repealing Trump Rule
he Biden administration on Wednesday restored protections for migratory birds that were loosened under former President Donald J. Trump, a move celebrated by conservationists but expected to exacerbate tensions between the administration and the oil and gas industry. The move comes as some bird species have been disappearing from the planet. North America has lost almost three billion birds in the past 50 years, scientists said. In addition to suffering from habitat loss and climate change, they are killed by collisions with buildings, power lines and communication towers. They die in oil waste pits and oil spills. Lisa Friedman and Catrin Einhorn report. (NY Times)

VIFF 2021: Orca documentary Coextinction delves into salmon, pipeline, and river issues
Filmmakers Gloria Pancrazi and Elena Jean didn’t start out to make a feature-length documentary about B.C.’s southern resident orcas when they first met in 2017. Pancrazi was tracking J-pod’s members off Saturna Island, at the southern boundary of the Salish Sea’s Gulf Islands, and Jean joined the team studying the salmon-eating marine mammals that some call “killer whales”.  Martin Dunphy reports. (Georgia Straight)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  241 AM PDT Thu Sep 30 2021   
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 1 PM PDT THIS AFTERNOON
THROUGH THIS EVENING
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 8 ft at 10 seconds. A chance of  rain.
TODAY  W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming 10 to 20 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 8 ft at 10 seconds. A chance of  rain.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Wednesday, September 29, 2021

9/29 Shell-boring worm, Fairy Cr protest, TMX treetop camp, ivory-billed woodpecker extinction, boatyard pollution, desalination

Shell-boring worm in oyster shell
(Julieta Martinelli, UW)


Shell-boring worm Polydora websteri
Polydora websteri is most likely not native to the Pacific Northwest and is found all over the world. The global distribution of this parasite is likely due to accidental spread by humans from moving bivalves around the globe for decades or longer. UW researchers have recently found P. websteri (along with other related shell-boring worms) in Pacific oysters in Oakland Bay and Totten Inlet. They want to find out how widespread P. websteri and its friends are in Puget Sound, how long the worms have been here, and how humans can help minimize negative consequences to the area's prized shellfish industry.  (Ecology's Critter of the Month)

'Substantial infringement of civil liberties' cited as court ends injunction against Fairy Creek protests
A British Columbia Supreme Court judge has denied an application to extend an injunction against old-growth logging blockades on southern Vancouver Island, writing that the actions of RCMP officers have put the court's reputation at risk. Justice Douglas Thompson handed down his reasons for judgment on Tuesday, writing that "it is not just and equitable in all the circumstances of the case" to grant Teal Cedar Products Ltd.'s request for an extended injunction order against protests blocking the forestry company's access to its tenure in the Fairy Creek watershed area north of Port Renfrew. Bethany Lindsay reports. (CBC)

Treetop camp protesting Trans Mountain pipeline dismantled
A treetop camp standing in the way of a multi-billion dollar pipeline expansion project has been dismantled following a court ordered injunction against demonstrators. Protesters against the federally-owned Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project watched as contractors accompanied by police sawed away a treehouse camp in the Brunette River Conservation Area that had been occupied since December of last year. Jon Hernandez reports. (CBC)

US says ivory-billed woodpecker, 22 other species extinct
Death’s come knocking a last time for the splendid ivory-billed woodpecker and 22 more birds, fish and other species: The U.S. government is declaring them extinct. It’s a rare move for wildlife officials to give up hope on a plant or animal, but government scientists say they’ve exhausted efforts to find these 23. And they warn climate change, on top of other pressures, could make such disappearances more common as a warming planet adds to the dangers facing imperiled plants and wildlife. Matthew Brown reports. (Associated Press)

Pollution is washing from boatyards into Puget Sound. Who’s responsible?
For about a decade, Washington has been attempting to figure out how to best regulate boatyards and their pollution. It’s trickier than it sounds — while stricter rules improve water quality and benefit marine life, they can also put boatyards out of business, since they have to pay for consulting and equipment, local industry members say. Ysabelle Kempe reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Desalination can make saltwater drinkable — but it won’t solve the U.S. water crisis
The water in the ocean is a tempting resource. Removing salt comes with environmental and economic costs, though. Michael Birnbaum reports. (Washington Post)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  302 AM PDT Wed Sep 29 2021   
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT
  
TODAY
 SE wind 15 to 25 kt easing to 10 to 20 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. W swell 8 ft at 10 seconds. Rain  in the morning then a chance of rain in the afternoon. 
TONIGHT
 E wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SE 15 to 25 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. SW swell 7 ft at 10 seconds. A  chance of rain in the evening then rain after midnight.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Tuesday, September 28, 2021

9/28 Bears and boulders, coat hypoxic areas, Chinook recovery, energy plan, Delta LNG jetty, Black Ball, Bears Ears

[PHOTO: Laurie MacBride]


Bears and Boulders
Laurie MacBride in Eye on Environment writes: "Boulders on many beaches along our coast are always being moved about, and not just by waves – it turns out that bears have a big paw in the process.If you’re anchored fairly close to shore in what we call a “bearable” place, you might see one rearranging the beach at low tide, like the Black bear in these photos."


Low oxygen levels along Pacific Northwest coast a ‘silent’ climate change crisis
Nearly two decades ago, fishers discovered an odd occurrence off the coast of Oregon. They were pulling up pots of dead or lethargic crabs. At first they suspected a chemical spill or a red tide. But instead, they learned, dangerously low levels of dissolved oxygen in the ocean water were to blame...These swaths of hypoxic areas have surfaced every summer on Pacific Northwest shores since it was first recorded in 2002. They are spurred by naturally occurring coastal upwellings and algae blooms, exacerbated by climate change, said Francis Chan, director of the Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies at Oregon State University. Akin to fire season, hypoxia season arrived earlier this year — the earliest start in 20 years, according to Chan. But unlike wildfire, or other visible climate emergencies, it’s gone largely unrecognized. Michael Garrison reports. (Seattle Times)

Chinook salmon recovery efforts continue for Skagit River, Puget Sound populations
Attention to restoring the Puget Sound chinook salmon population, of which Skagit River fish are a major component, continues to grow. Despite billions of dollars invested in research and habitat restoration since Puget Sound chinook were listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1999, the population remains at concerning numbers. The state’s Salmon Recovery Funding Board this week announced another $21 million in grant funding for various projects primarily targeting chinook, and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife announced an effort to expand upon chinook conservation and restoration plans. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

More renewable energy, less energy efficiency in new power plan
The draft Northwest Power Plan is dramatically different from previous versions. People can comment on the plan through Nov. 19. More renewable energy development and less room for energy conservation are two of the biggest changes in the draft of the new regional power plan. The Northwest Power Plan guides the electricity demand decisions of the Bonneville Power Administration over the next 20 years. Courtney Flatt reports. (NW News Network)

Delta wants more answers on LNG jetty project
The City of Delta is asking for further assessment on the application to build a new liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility adjacent to the FortisBC plant in Tilbury. The Tilbury Jetty Limited Partnership is proposing to construct the Tilbury Marine Jetty Project on the Fraser River. The project involves the berthing and transferring of LNG to marine barges and carriers for delivery to mostly offshore export markets, loading product from the FortisBC facility. Sandor Gyarmati reports. (Delta Optimist)

Black Ball receives grant from Port Angeles City Council to keep it afloat
Black Ball Ferry Line has received $500,000 in federal COVID-19 relief funding from the city of Port Angeles, helping the 62-year-old company weather the shutdown of service to Victoria into 2022, if need be. Paul Gottlieb reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Tribes want ‘immediate action’ to reverse Trump’s cut to Bears Ears National Monument
Native American tribes told President Biden they want "immediate action" to enlarge Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, which the Trump administration shrank by 85 percent. Joshua Partlow reports. (Washington Post)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  248 AM PDT Tue Sep 28 2021   
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT
  
TODAY
 W wind 10 to 20 kt becoming 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 14 ft at 14 seconds subsiding to  11 ft at 13 seconds in the afternoon. A chance of showers and a  slight chance of tstms in the morning. 
TONIGHT
 SW wind to 10 kt becoming SE 5 to 15 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 8 ft at 11 seconds. A  slight chance of rain in the evening then a chance of rain after  midnight.


--

"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Monday, September 27, 2021

9/27 American dipper, Makah whale hunt, Fairy Cr protest, Skagit dams, bag ban, Oly Pipeline, Ida's oil, Mazama gophers, Charles Costanzo

 

American Dipper [Gene Helfman]


American Dipper Cinclus mexicanus
Gene Helman reports camping along the Skagit River and watching the pink salmon spawning at the river's edge. A dipper landed, dove into the water and popped out with a salmon egg in its beak. From Wikipedia, "The dipper is also known as a water ouzel. It bobs its whole body up and down during pauses as it feeds on the bottom of fast-moving, rocky streams where it feeds on aquatic insects and their larvae and may also take tiny fish or tadpoles [and fish eggs]. It has an extra eyelid that allows it to see underwater, and scales that close its nostrils when submerged.The presence of this indicator species shows good water quality; it was the favorite bird of famous naturalist John Muir."

Makah whale hunt approval recommended by federal official 
A federal official has issued his recommendation regarding the Makah whale hunt. Judge George G. Jordan, administrative law judge with the U.S. Coast Guard, says he recommends granting the waiver the tribe has requested under the Marine Mammal Protection Act. This is a much-awaited decision after a weeklong public hearing that packed a courtroom in Seattle nearly two years ago. The judge’s response comes much later than expected, slowed by complications from the COVID pandemic. It does not mean the tribe has approval to resume the hunt; there are still several administrative steps that are needed, including approval by the head of NOAA Fisheries, Janet Coit, and permitting that could be more complex than anticipated, based on the ruling. In 1999, the Makahs briefly revived their hunt, after gray whales were de-listed as an endangered species in 1994. The whales had rebounded despite the ravages of the hunting era. That hunt 22 years ago was hugely controversial. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KNKX)

‘Someone Is Going to be Seriously Injured or Killed’
Lawyers, a doctor, a criminology professor and dozens of protesters are warning that RCMP enforcement on the frontlines of the Fairy Creek blockades could lead to serious injury or death. Michelle Gamage reports. (The Tyee)

Legal battles unfold during Skagit River dam relicensing
From Whatcom County where Seattle City Light's three Skagit River dams are located to Seattle where the public utility is headquartered, lawsuits are stacking up as relicensing of the century-old hydroelectric project gets underway. While one lawsuit focuses on "greenwashing" in Seattle City Light advertising and another focuses on the utility's financials, there's a common underlying theme among them: Fish. Skagit River salmon and steelhead populations are in trouble, and the dam relicensing due to be complete in 2025 has placed renewed attention on how Seattle City Light's Gorge, Diablo and Ross dams and powerhouses may affect those species.  Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Ban on single-use plastic bags in WA begins Oct. 1 
Beginning Oct. 1, 2021, a statewide ban of single-use plastic bags will go into effect in Washington. Here’s what you need to know. People in Washington use two billion single-use plastic bags every year, according to the Department of Ecology. Those single-use plastic bags are a major contaminant of Washington’s rivers, streams, roads and basically everything else, according to the department. Henry Stewart-Wood reports. (The Weekly)

Olympic Pipeline project planned in Bow area
Plans are under review for the proposed relocation of a section of the Olympic Pipeline where it crosses Colony Creek in Bow. The Olympic Pipe Line Co. proposes to cut out a portion of the existing petroleum product pipeline where erosion has left it exposed in the creek bed. Also proposed is stabilizing the stream bank in that area and installing a new segment of pipeline 10 feet to the west, according to a Clean Water Act permit application filed with the state Department of Ecology. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

See the Dozens of Offshore Oil Spills Caused by Hurricane Ida
 When Hurricane Ida barreled into the Louisiana coast with near 150 mile-per-hour winds on Aug. 30, it left a trail of destruction. The storm also triggered the most oil spills detected from space after a weather event in the Gulf of Mexico since the federal government started using satellites to track spills and leaks a decade ago. Blacki Migliozzi and Hiroko Tabuchi repoort. (NY Times)

Thurston plan to protect gophers, streamline permit process up for public comment
Residents have a new opportunity to comment on a Thurston County plan to locally manage federally protected species, including three subspecies of Mazama pocket gophers. The county and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released a draft environmental impact statement on the Thurston County Habitat Conservation Plan on Friday, Sept. 24. The move kicked off a 45-day public comment period prior to final federal approval, according to a county news release. MART├ŹN BILBAO Martin Bilbao reports. (The Olympian)

Charles Costanzo named executive director of Puget Sound Pilots
Puget Sound Pilots appointed a new executive director, Charles Costanzo, formerly general counsel and Pacific region vice president for American Waterways Operators (AWO). Puget Sound Pilots is an organization of independent, trained ship captains who help guide large vessels through Puget Sound waterways. Marissa Nall reports. (Puget Sound Business Journal)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  204 AM PDT Mon Sep 27 2021   
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT
  
TODAY
 S wind 15 to 20 kt becoming 10 to 15 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft building to 3 to 5 ft in the  afternoon. W swell 7 ft at 11 seconds building to 14 ft at 10  seconds in the afternoon. A chance of tstms. Showers in the  afternoon. 
TONIGHT
 S wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SW 5 to 15 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 15 ft at 14 seconds.  Showers and a chance of tstms.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, September 24, 2021

9/24 Shield Dapperling, greening Bellingham, giant hornet nest, anchored vessels, Maynard Johnny Jr, arsenic fish, week in review

Shield Dapperling [Dick Culbert/WikiCommons]



Shield Dapperling Lepiota clypeolaria
Shield Dapperling is one of the larger Lepiota species, many of which are poisonous. This woodland mushroom could easily be mistaken for one of the edible Agaricus species that occur in wooded areas. The white and unchanging gill colour should be enough to ring warning bells, and its unpleasant odour is yet another of the features that should help foragers avoid an unpleasant mistake. Thie woolly vellum flakes on the stem are another macroscopic feature that helps identify this toxic toadstool. (First Nature)

Even a green city like Bellingham has learned it’s not easy to cap demand for fossil fuel
In late 2019, mere weeks before the first U.S. case of coronavirus case was detected 60 miles south, the city council of Bellingham, Washington, gathered for a presentation from its Climate Protection Action Plan Task Force: nine community members charged with drawing up a road map for Bellingham to achieve its goals for cutting carbon emissions. Ysabelle Kempe reports. (Investigate What/Grist)

Washington agriculture officials eradicate third Asian giant hornet nest of 2021 in Whatcom County
The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) said Thursday that it has eradicated the third Asian giant hornet nest of the year in Whatcom County. The nest, which was located approximately 20 feet up in a tree, required special equipment and help from the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to remove. A total of 10 combs were removed from the nest. Callie Craighead reports. (Seattle PI)

Coast Guard monitors backlog of anchored vessels in Puget Sound
The Coast Guard continues to monitor containerships anchored in the greater Puget Sound area due to a logistics backlog affecting the entire U.S. West Coast and Canada from Los Angeles to Prince Rupert, British Columbia. The unprecedented backlog has resulted in a greater number of ships, in particular containerships, utilizing anchorages in Puget Sound. Several factors determine what constitutes a suitable anchorage, particularly for a vessel the size of the large containerships that typically transit through Puget Sound ports. (Workboat)

Salish Heron artist named
BC Ferries, in partnership with the First Peoples’ Cultural Council, has selected Coast Salish artist Maynard Johnny Jr. from Chemainus to create the design for BC Ferries’ newest Salish Class vessel, the Salish Heron...Johnny is Coast Salish from Penelakut on his father’s side and is connected to Cape Mudge Kwakwaka’wakw on his mother’s side. (Gulf Islands Driftwood)

Arsenic makes these south Puget Sound fish unsafe to eat
Researchers at the University of Washington and UW Tacoma have been studying arsenic levels in the mud, water and in creatures from lakes in the south Puget Sound area. Eating contaminated fish or snails from these lakes could lead to health risks. Pollution from regional smelter emissions is likely the source of high concentrations of arsenic found at the bottom of lakes in King and Pierce counties. Arsenic is a chemical linked to increased cancer risk.  Kiyomi Taguchi and Sarah McQuate report. (UW News)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 9/24/21: Bluebird Friday, Greenpeace at 50, Bristol Bay, SCL not green, Fairy Cr protest, Bering Sea crabs, Liberal minority, net pen suit, L47, hydrofluorocarbons, greening Bellingham


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  250 AM PDT Fri Sep 24 2021   
TODAY
 E wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft or less. W swell 3 ft  at 10 seconds building to 5 ft at 10 seconds in the afternoon. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell  5 ft at 11 seconds. 
SAT
 W wind to 10 kt becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 5 ft at 11 seconds. A slight  chance of rain. SAT NIGHT  W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming SE after midnight. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 13 seconds. 
SUN
 E wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SE 15 to 25 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. W swell 5 ft at 13 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Thursday, September 23, 2021

9/23 Armillaria ostoyae, SRKW census, Iceland whales, hydrofluorocarbons, TMX protest, feral sheep, save threatened species

Armillaria ostoyae [W.J. Pilsak/WikiCommons]

 
Armillaria ostoyae
Armillaria ostoyae is common on both hardwood and conifer wood in forests west of the Cascade Range in Oregon, United States. In most areas of North America, Armillaria ostoyae can be separated from other species by its physical features: cream-brown colors, prominent cap scales, and a well-developed stem ring distinguish it from other Armillaria. Armillaria ostoyae grows and spreads primarily underground, such that the bulk of the organism is not visible from the surface. In the autumn, the subterranean parts of the organism bloom "honey mushrooms" as surface fruits. Low competition for land and nutrients often allow this fungus to grow to huge proportions, and it possibly covers more total geographical area than any other single living organism. A spatial genetic analysis estimated that an individual specimen of A. ostoyae growing over 91 acres (37 ha) in northern Michigan. (Wikipedia)

Orca census shows some improvement, but many whales still die before their time
The annual census of the endangered Southern Resident killer whales, submitted yesterday to the federal government, shows three births and one death from mid-2020 to mid-2021...[The] actual number of Southern Residents today stands at 73, because another orca — 35-year-old K21 (named Cappuccino) — is believed to have died in late July or early August — after the census cutoff date. The newest whales added to the population are J57, a male named Phoenix born last September to Tahlequah ( J35); J58, a female named Crescent born last September to Eclipse (J41); and L125, a calf (gender unknown) born in February of this year to Surprise! (L86)...The number of whales in L pod now totals 33, J pod has 24, and K pod has 16. This does not include Lolita/Tokitae, an orca from L pod that was captured in Puget Sound and is held at the Miami Seaquarium in Florida. Along with the new census report, Ken Balcomb of the Center for Whale Research sadly confirmed the death of L47, a 47-year-old female named Marina, who has been apparently missing since early summer. Christopher Dunagan reports. (Puget Sound Institute)

Iceland’s Confusing Inter-cetacean Conflict
It’s pilot whales versus killer whales in the waters off southern Iceland—though researchers can’t really explain why. Marina Wang reports. (Hakai Magazine)

EPA Moves To Sharply Limit Potent Gases Used In Refrigerators And Air Conditioners
In what officials call a key step to combat climate change, the Environmental Protection Agency is sharply limiting domestic production and use of hydrofluorocarbons, highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used in refrigerators and air conditioners. The new rule, which follows through on a law Congress passed last year, is intended to decrease U.S. production and use of HFCs by 85% over the next 15 years, part of a global phaseout designed to slow global warming. (Associated Press)

Police in cherry picker remove, arrest anti-pipeline tree-sitter in Burnaby
Police used a white cherry picker to extract and arrest a tree sitter Wednesday for breaching an existing court- ordered injunction at the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion worksite near North Road and Highway 1. The man was suspended 15 metres in a tree in protest of the pipeline. (CBC)

On Lasqueti Island, a Wild and Woolly Issue Has Divided Residents
Of all the fractious debates plaguing communities today, here it’s feral sheep. Can islanders reach a compromise? Andrea Bennett reports. (The Tyee)

Philanthropists pledge $5 billion to save threatened species
A group of philanthropists pledged $5 billion by 2030 to help conservation and protect biodiversity around the world. Steven Mufson reports. (Washington Post)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  233 AM PDT Thu Sep 23 2021   
TODAY
 Light wind becoming N to 10 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 1 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 12 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 Light wind becoming SE to 10 kt after midnight. Wind  waves less than 1 ft becoming 1 ft or less after midnight. W  swell 4 ft at 11 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Wednesday, September 22, 2021

9/22 Insidious gomphidius, L47 death, steelhead net pen, white-nose syndrome, Carbon Recovery Project, septic repair loans, Vancouver conservatives, Columbia Gorge daisy, Dakota pipe, border closure

Insidious Gomphidius [Christian Ferrer/WikiCommons]

 

Insidious Gomphidius Gomphidius oregonensis
Insidious Gomphidius is a mushroom found only in western North America, most commonly on the Pacific Coast. Gomphidius oregonensis was first described in 1897 by botanist Charles Horton Peck. The genus name is derived from the Greek gomphos, meaning "nail" and relates to the shape of the mushroom. Oregonensis simply pertains to the area in which the species was first observed.

Southern resident grandmother orca 'missing and likely dead'
The Center for Whale Research has declared an orca in one of the Puget Sound’s endangered southern resident killer whale pods “missing and likely dead.” Mother and grandmother L47, or Marina as she was also known, was missing from the center’s 2021 census, according to a Monday news release, and she hasn’t been spotted since Feb. 27. The 47-year-old orca “did not appear to be in particularly poor condition” in that sighting, but she was missing from surveys this summer conducted by Fisheries and Oceans Canada in the western Strait of Juan de Fuca. (Associated Press)

Swinomish tribal members say steelhead net pens violate fishing rights, add their voice to state Supreme Court case
...The Swinomish Tribe has joined as a friend of the court in a lawsuit to block permits that allow steelhead farming in a commercial net pen just offshore near Hope Island. The state Supreme Court is scheduled to hear the case next week. In its brief filed in the case, Swinomish tribal leaders, elders and fishers say the pen is a deep cultural insult and violation of their treaty fishing rights. The pen’s anchor lines foul their nets, tangle crab pots and force tribal fishers to keep clear of a productive fishing area they reserved a right to in the Treaty of Point Elliott, tribal members stated in declarations. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

Invasive fungus that harms bats is spreading in Washington
An invasive fungus that causes white-nose syndrome in bats continues to spread in Washington, with the fungus detected in late spring near Rimrock Lake. During spring and summer field work this year, scientists with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Forest Service detected the fungus or disease in Yakima, Chelan and Mason counties. (Associated Press)

In Edmonds, $26M goes to a cleaner way to get rid of poop
If you live in Edmonds, whatever you flush down the toilet will soon be a little better for the world. The city’s new Carbon Recovery Project has a fancy name for a dirty job: reducing the carbon footprint of sludge.  Zachariah Bryan reports. (Everett Herald)

Loans for septic repairs and replacement now available to entire state
Approximately a third of Washington homes use septic systems for wastewater treatment. Well-functioning and properly maintained septic systems can effectively treat household wastewater for many years. Failing septic systems can result in sewage backing up in the home or entering local waterways and groundwater supplies– posing a public health threat. As of Sept. 1, the Regional On-Site Sewage System Loan Program has expanded state-wide, adding 17 counties to this successful program. (Washington Dept. of Ecology)

Conservative losses in Metro Vancouver suburbs mark biggest change for B.C. in status-quo election
Conservatives failed to make inroads in Metro Vancouver — in fact, quite the opposite.  The party lost Cloverdale-Langley City, Port Moody-Coquitlam and both Richmond ridings. They declined in support in four of the five Surrey ridings. Middle-class, suburban, multicultural ridings — key to the Harper government's victories last decade — slipped further away despite the party's best efforts. ustin McElroy reports. (CBC)

Hunting for one of Washington’s rarest flowers
Professor Steven Clark spends his days bushwhacking brushy trails until they turn into rocky scrambles, then vertical cliffs. It’s arduous work in service of a unique goal. He’s searching for the Columbia Gorge daisy, a rare flower that only grows in the trickles of water and tiny pockets of dirt in the wet, cliffside crevices of the Columbia River Gorge. Sarah Hoffman reports. (Crosscut)

Justices Urged To Revive Dakota Access Pipeline Permit
Owners of the Dakota Access pipeline on Monday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the invalidation of a key approval for the controversial project, saying the more extensive environmental review ordered by the D.C. Circuit is unwarranted and could stymie U.S. infrastructure development. (Law360)

US extends land border restrictions with Canada, Mexico through Oct. 21
It's been more than a month since Canada reopened its land borders to travelers from the United States, but the U.S. has no plans to return the favor any time soon. Border restrictions on nonessential travel have been extended again, this time through Oct. 21, White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Jeff Zients said Monday. The restrictions were first implemented in March 2020 and have since been extended on a monthly basis. Bailey Schulz reports. (USA Today)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  134 AM PDT Wed Sep 22 2021   
TODAY
 W wind 5 to 15 kt easing to 10 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 12 seconds. A chance of rain  in the morning. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt easing to 10 kt after midnight. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 13 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Tuesday, September 21, 2021

9/21 Chanterelle, Canada election, Bering Sea crabs, ocean plastic, salmon people mural, Squamish estuary, Bezos green $ pledge

 

Chanterelle

Chanterelles
Chanterelle is the common name of several species of fungi in the genera Cantharellus, Craterellus, Gomphus, and Polyozellus. They are among the most popular of wild edible mushrooms. At one time, all yellow or golden chanterelles in western North America had been classified as Cantharellus cibarius. Using DNA analysis, they have since been shown to be a group of related species. In 1997, the Pacific golden chanterelle (C. formosus) and C. cibarius var. roseocanus were identified, followed by C. cascadensis in 2003, C. californicus in 2008, and C. enelensis in 2017. C. cibarius var. roseocanus occurs in the Pacific Northwest in Sitka spruce forests, as well as Eastern Canada in association with Pinus banksiana.

B.C. virtually split down the middle as Liberals projected to maintain minority government in Ottawa 
While results are still rolling in from across B.C. in Canada's 44th general election, the province seems to be nearly split down the middle, with left-leaning parties dominating the coast and the Conservatives holding onto the Interior. Bethany Lindsay reports. (CBC) The Trudeau era continues — for now  If voters had a message to send, it was this: Get back to work. Aaron Wherry writes. (CBC) Possible Winner in Trudeau’s Status-Quo Result? BC MPs  Candidates from the province are positioned to have influence in a minority government. (The Tyee) What Canada’s environment and climate policies will look like under a Liberal minority government  From eliminating fossil fuel subsidies to support for nature-based climate solutions and protected areas, here are some key things we can expect from the new federal government. Sarah Cox writes. (The Narwhal)

Valuable crab populations are in a ‘very scary’ decline in warming Bering Sea
King and snow crab populations in the Bering Sea have plummeted ahead of the harvest season, some by 99% compared to previous years. Scientists say warmer water could be to blame as protective ice recedes and predators feast on young crab. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times)

Scooping Plastic Out of the Ocean Is a Losing Game
Open ocean cleanups won’t solve the marine plastics crisis. To really make a difference, here’s what we should do instead. Ryan Stuart reports. (Hakai Magazine)

New Bellingham mural illustrates Coast Salish history
Local artists Jason LaClair and Gretchen Leggit pair up to paint the Forest St. mural and tell the story of the "salmon people." Anne Erickson and Alex Moore report. (KING)

New report highlights the value of Squamish estuary
The Squamish River Watershed Society has partnered with the Squamish Nation, the Healthy Waters Initiative and the Fish And Wildlife Compensation Program to release a new report called “Natural Capital Assets: The Squamish Estuary” (The Squamish Reporter)

Jeff Bezos pledges $1 billion to protect 30 percent of the Earth’s land and sea
Bezos’s large donations are transforming climate philanthropy — even as Amazon’s cloud-computing business and shipping operations have a significant carbon footprint. Jay Greene and Steven Mufson report. (Washington Post)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  205 AM PDT Tue Sep 21 2021   
TODAY
 E wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 5 ft  at 10 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind to 10 kt rising to 5 to 15 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 5 ft at 10 seconds. A chance of  rain after midnight.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Monday, September 20, 2021

9/20 Shaggy mane, voting day, foraging, Fairy Cr protest, Seattle Light, Bedwell R, Bristol Bay sockeye, tufted puffin, Greenpeace, BC COVID passport

Shaggy mane

 
Shaggy mane Coprinus comatus
Shaggy Mane has an elongated bullet shaped, shaggy cap, with brownish upturned scales and a straight fairly smooth stem.These grow in summer and fall in grass, wood chips, rocky, or hard packed soil often appearing shortly after a soaking rain. They may grow singly or scattered but often in large, tightly packed groups. Some years they are very common in city and suburban locations, pastures, lawns, gardens, along driveways, etc. Sometimes they are found in huge quantities presenting quite a dilemma since they require almost immediate preparation. (Mushroom Collecting)

It's voting day! Here's what British Columbians need know about the federal election
After a snap election was called on Aug. 15, Canadians will finish voting today to elect a new federal government. Up for grabs in the 44th general election are 338 seats in the House of Commons, 42 of which are in B.C. (CBC)

Foraging for mushrooms this fall? Here are some dos and don'ts
"Focus on the ones you know, and harvest those properly."  Michelle Gomez reports. (CBC)

Fairy Creek’s old-growth logging protests injunction remains temporarily: judge
A British Columbia Supreme Court judge suggested Thursday he will consider new options to address the future of an injunction against blockades by people opposed to logging old-growth trees on part of Vancouver Island. Justice Douglas Thompson expressed concern about the situation that’s unfolding in the Fairy Creek area north of Port Renfrew after hearing from lawyers representing protesters and the RCMP. “Perhaps, the only thing everybody agrees upon right now is what’s being done is not working,” said Thompson, who instructed lawyers to come to court Friday prepared to discuss the structure of the injunction. He said he will not deliver a decision Friday on the company’s application and his ruling will come after Sept. 26. (Canadian Press)

Sauk-Suiattle tribe sues Seattle City Light, demands it can’t call itself ‘green’
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe took the city of Seattle to task in a class-action lawsuit filed Friday on behalf of its members and the public, stating the electric utility’s green power claims are misleading and hurting the tribe. The lawsuit filed in King County Superior Court seeks an injunction restraining Seattle City Light from advertising itself as a fish-friendly, green and environmentally responsible utility until Seattle provides fish passage at its three Skagit River dams. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

‘A lot of salmon died’: Ahousaht Guardians look to watershed restoration amid B.C.’s dangerously dry summer
The province’s prolonged drought is exacerbating the damage done to Bedwell River by decades of forestry around Tofino. Now, First Nations and conservation groups are teaming up to protect salmon and bring the watershed back to life Stephanie Wood reports. (The Narwhal)

The lessons for British Columbia in Alaska’s epic Bristol Bay sockeye
The world’s most abundant sockeye fishery is teeming with 10 million more fish than anticipated this year. Experts on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border are wondering if the six uninterrupted river basins of the Bristol Bay watershed — free of fish farms and hatcheries but currently threatened by the proposed Pebble mine — might hold key insights for salmon populations dwindling all across the province of B.C. Sarah Cox reports. (The Narwhal)

Nonprofit teaching youths, community about imperiled Salish Sea bird
The black-bodied, orange-billed tufted puffin can be difficult to find not only because it’s a seabird that spends most of its time bobbing on the water and obscured by waves, but also because its population has plummeted in Washington. Some local youths, though, got about as close as possible this summer to one of the birds’ two remaining nesting sites in state waters of the Salish Sea...On Sunday, Sept. 12, the Salish Sea School took adults on an outing to Smith Island as a fundraising event that featured tufted puffins at the end of their nesting season. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

At 50, Greenpeace is an environmental success story — with a daunting future
Fifty years ago, an ad-hoc group of environmentalists gathered around living rooms and kitchen tables in Vancouver's Kitsilano neighbourhood with a shared goal of stopping the United States from testing nuclear weapons off the western coast of Alaska.
 hey decided to sail a leaky, 24-metre-long halibut fishing boat directly toward the blast zone as a form of protest. The ship was ultimately forced back, but the move drew international attention. Nuclear testing in the area ended months later. Today, the group with small beginnings in Vancouver has grown into one of the most recognizable environmental organizations in the world. Greenpeace has a presence in more than 55 countries, with nearly three million members globally. (CBC)

B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccine passport system succeeds where Alberta’s incentives failed
On Aug. 23, with the fourth wave of COVID-19 starting to build – and queues at vaccine clinics shrinking – the B.C. government announced plans to require vaccine passports to access restaurants and bars, sports events, theatres and gyms. Angry protests followed. But the policy has also driven a marked increase in vaccination rates. While Alberta tried lotteries and $100 cash cards to entice vaccination holdouts, B.C. health officials, along with those in Ontario, Quebec and other provinces, calculated that it would take a tougher policy to boost rates. This week, after repeatedly ruling out such a policy, Alberta and Saskatchewan announced their own vaccine passport systems. And it seems Alberta is finally getting results. Justine Hunter reports. (Globe and Mail)

Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  202 AM PDT Mon Sep 20 2021   
TODAY  W wind to 10 kt becoming E. Wind waves 1 ft or less. W  swell 11 ft subsiding to 7 ft at 11 seconds. A chance of rain. 
TONIGHT
 Light wind becoming SE to 10 kt after midnight. Wind  waves less than 1 ft becoming 1 ft or less after midnight. W  swell 5 ft at 10 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Friday, September 17, 2021

9/17 Maui Wowie, Mt Baker melt, Howe Sound, steelhead, sea stars, Fairy Cr protest, climate solutions, English River, week in review

Maui Wowie


Maui Wowie Marijuana Strain  80% Sativa / 20% Indica
Maui Wowie, also known as Maui Waui, is a sativa dominant strain, which is mostly found and grown in the Hawaiian Islands. (AllBud)

End-of-summer hike brings home climate effects on Mount Baker
Hotter-than-usual weather — including a heat dome incident — resulted in more extensive snow and glacier melt than usual on Mount Baker this summer. A hike up Heliotrope Ridge Trail yielded dramatic close-up views of how much the mountain has changed over the last several decades. Alan Fritzberg writes. (Salish Current)

B.C.'s Howe Sound designated a UNESCO biosphere region after years of lobbying
Designation will allow local authorities to collaborate more effectively on conservation and development. Akshay Kulkarni reports. (CBC)

Why are Columbia River steelhead having such a bad year?
The bottom has dropped out of the steelhead population this year, and the fish’s mysterious ocean life is making it harder to know why. Bradley W. Parks reports. (OPB)

At Friday Harbor Labs, scientists give sea stars a chance to shine
At the UW's Friday Harbor Laboratories, scientists give sunflower sea stars a chance to shine. Michelle Ma reports. (UW Magazine)

Fairy Creek protesters aren't terrorists, lawyers argue during third day of hearings on injunction
Teal Cedar Products Ltd. is asking for a one-year extension of a B.C. Supreme Court order against blockades. Adam van der Zwan reports. (CBC)

Where federal parties stand on Canada’s sexiest emissions fix: nature-based climate solutions
Canada has a huge role to play in the global fight against the climate emergency — simply by not destroying the intact forests, grasslands and wetlands that naturally store carbon. Here’s how the major parties are leveraging everything from conservation goals to restorative agriculture to Indigenous Guardians programs in their campaign platforms. Stephanie Wood reports. (The Narwhal)

Chip Wilson's Foundation continues its land conservancy efforts through $6 Million donation to The Nature Trust of BC
The Wilson 5 Foundation has doubled down on its pledge to protect and conserve critical habitats of Southwestern British Columbia through its latest donation to The Nature Trust of BC. The $6 Million gift will allow The Nature Trust of BC to purchase Mariner Way in Parksville, a 2.8-hectare in-fill property at the mouth of the iconic Englishman River on Vancouver Island. (Nature Trust of BC)

Salish Sea News Week in Review 9/17/21: Fall weather Friday, scorched earth, Western redcedar, Sunshine Coast, bird migration, pinto abalone, BC fossil fuels, TMX insurance, salmon for orcas, pregnant whales, steelhead, sea stars


Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  234 AM PDT Fri Sep 17 2021   
GALE WARNING IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS EVENING
  
TODAY
 E wind 10 to 20 kt becoming SE 25 to 35 kt in the  afternoon. Combined seas 2 to 4 ft with a dominant period of  10 seconds building to 4 to 7 ft with a dominant period of  8 seconds in the afternoon. Rain. 
TONIGHT
 SW wind 15 to 25 kt easing to 10 to 20 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft. W swell 4 ft at 9 seconds  building to 6 ft at 9 seconds after midnight. Rain. 
SAT
 SW wind to 10 kt becoming S in the afternoon. Wind waves  1 ft or less. SW swell 6 ft at 8 seconds. Showers and a slight  chance of tstms. 
SAT NIGHT
 E wind to 10 kt becoming SE 5 to 15 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 7 ft at 10 seconds. 
SUN
 Light wind becoming NW to 10 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves 1 ft or less. W swell 7 ft at 11 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to mikesato772 (@) gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Thursday, September 16, 2021

9/16 French bulldog, salmon for orcas, Lynda Mapes, right whales, logging and climate, fossil fuel failure, BC fake reef

French bulldog [AKC]



French bulldog
The French Bulldog is a breed of domestic dog, bred to be companion dogs. The breed is the result of a cross between Toy Bulldogs imported from England, and local ratters in Paris, France, in the 1800s. They are stocky, compact dogs with a friendly, mild-mannered temperament. (Wikipedia)

Feds OK plan to cut salmon fishing when needed for orcas 
Federal officials have approved a plan that calls for cutting nontribal salmon fishing along the West Coast when the fish are needed to help the Northwest’s endangered killer whales. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries adopted the plan Tuesday as recommended by the Pacific Fishery Management Council. It calls for restricting commercial and recreational salmon fishing when chinook salmon numbers are especially low. (Associated Press)

Author of ‘Orca’ has a message for the Northwest: hope has a price tag
Science reporter Lynda Mapes’ work takes her to locales such as the Elwha River, where she reported on the science of dam removal. In her new book, Orca: Shared Waters, Shared Home, Mapes says she came to understand that orcas are “the key to what’s going on in this place … If the whales can’t survive, what does that say about us?” Gretchen K. Wing writes. (Salish Current)

Scientists spot rare, mysterious right whales in waters off Alaska
Scientists earlier this summer made a rare sighting of two pairs of North Pacific right whales, noteworthy because only about 30 of the massive, endangered animals are thought to remain in the waters off Alaska. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times) Why Canada is making it harder to go whale watching  New regulations aim to save orcas and humpbacks. Here’s what this means for whale tourism. Johanna Read reports. (National Geographic)

Climate change is reason to deny injunction extension over BC logging
Public concerns over climate change should play a large part in deciding whether a B.C. forestry company is granted an extension to an injunction against protests against the logging of old-growth forests, a court heard Wednesday. The B.C. Supreme Court must weigh the importance to the environment that protecting old-growth trees plays in the Fairy Creek area of Vancouver Island against the economic interests of Teal Cedar Products Ltd., which has applied for a one-year extension to the injunction, lawyer Steven Kelliher said. Dirk Meissner  reports. (Canadian Press)

No federal party offers clear path on how to wind down fossil fuel production
When asked about new scientific research showing much of the country’s oil, gas and coal should stay in the ground so that Canada meets its climate targets, none of the major parties were able to say how they plan to achieve this. Ali Raza reports. (The Narwhal)

Model of navy helicopter to be added to artificial reef in B.C.
A group that transforms decommissioned ships into new marine habitats is hoping to expand one of its artificial reefs north of Vancouver. The Artificial Reef Society of British Columbia has commissioned a full-scale model of a Sea King helicopter to be built and the lowered 70 feet below the ocean surface onto the flight deck of the HMCS Annapolis. Eric Lloyd reports. (CTV News)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  229 AM PDT Thu Sep 16 2021   
TODAY
 SE wind to 10 kt rising to 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 8 seconds subsiding to  4 ft at 9 seconds in the afternoon. 
TONIGHT
 SE wind to 10 kt becoming SW 10 to 20 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 1 to 3 ft after  midnight. W swell 4 ft at 10 seconds. A chance of rain in the  evening then rain likely after midnight.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

9/15 NZ spinach, TMX insurance, Enbridge reroute, SRKW return, BC dams, razor clams, COVID-19 vax, dead zones, Being Frank, green crab, eat weeds

New Zealand spinach


New Zealand spinach Tetragonia tetragonoides
New Zealand spinach is a flowering plant in the fig-marigold family. It is often cultivated as a leafy vegetable. It is a widespread species, native to eastern Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. (Wikipedia)

Trans Mountain Loses 16th Insurer as Industry Giant Chubb Walks Away
The world’s biggest publicly-traded provider of property and casualty insurance, Chubb, has become the 16th insurer to declare that it won’t back the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline, a coalition of climate and Indigenous campaigners announced yesterday. The flurry of social media activity was triggered by a single tweet from Financial Times insurance correspondent Ian Smith... “Chubb does not provide insurance coverage for any tar sands projects,” a spokesperson told Smith, following a protest at the U.S. Open tennis tournament earlier this month. (Energy Mix) Chubb exits from covering tar sands projects  Lyle Adriano reports. (Insurance Business Magazine)

B.C. First Nation demands Enbridge reroute gas pipeline after 2018 explosion
A First Nation in northern British Columbia said on Tuesday it was trying to force Enbridge to reroute a natural gas pipeline off its reserve lands after the line exploded in 2018, causing residents to flee their homes. The Lheidli T'enneh First Nation has written to the Canadian federal and B.C. provincial governments, which grant pipeline rights of way, asking ministers to order the Calgary-based energy company to reroute a 1.5 kilometre section of its T-South pipeline network that crosses the nation's reserve lands. (Reuters/CBC)

Southern Resident orcas return to Salish Sea area
After a long absence from the Salish Sea, some Southern Resident orcas found salmon near the San Juan Islands last week before making a one-day trip farther south into the Puget Sound Sept. 7. Normally, the endangered whales don’t head south until early October. Members of J pod passed close to Bush Point on Whidbey Island during their Sept. 7 visit. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Audit found 87 high-risk B.C. dams with ‘deficiencies,’ but doesn’t say where
B.C.’s auditor general is urging people not to be alarmed after releasing a 35-page report that found provincial officials weren’t doing enough to prevent dam failures that could lead to deaths and destruction. Sarah Cox reports. (The Narwhal)

The Aquaculture Industry Needs a Heat-Loving Salmon
Climate change is a huge threat to salmon farming. Scientists are on the hunt for a fish that can handle the heat. Chris Baraniuk reports. (Hakai Magazine)

First razor clam digs for 2021-2022 get green light
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has given final approval to the first nine razor clam digs of the 2021-22 season, with early-morning digs kicking off beginning this Friday. Shellfish managers with WDFW approved the digs after results of marine toxin tests showed clams at all open beaches were safe for human consumption. The state Department of Health finalized the results early Monday. Pierre LaBossiere reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

COVID-19: Over 70 per cent of all British Columbians now fully vaccinated  David Carrigg reports. (Vancouver Sun)  VA) Washington State COVID-19 Data Dashboard As of September 13, 68.1% of Washingtonians 12 and older are fully vaccinated. This number is higher than the DOH data dashboard because it includes state Immunization Information System (IIS) data, as well as aggregate data from the Department of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs.

Experts seek ways to avoid 'dead zones' in Puget Sound caused by excess nutrients from humans
The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDOE) says that excess nutrients from humans are contributing to low oxygen levels in Puget Sound. If oxygen levels drop low enough, it could lead to what’s called “dead zones,” or areas where aquatic life cannot be sustained because of the lack of oxygen. The current levels of dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound do not meet water quality standards and is “bad news for aquatic life,” according to WSDOE. (KING)

Being Frank: We have no time to slow down our recovery efforts
The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission lost an irreplaceable leader last month when our chairperson, Lorraine Loomis, walked on. Lorraine’s contributions to protecting treaty rights can’t be overstated. Before she was elected NWIFC chairperson, she served as a commissioner for more than 40 years, many of those sitting beside Billy Frank Jr. as vice chair. Shawn Yanity writes. (Sequim Gazette)

Flipping the 'genetic paradox of invasions'
A new study led by Carolyn Tepolt, an associate scientist of biology at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, is investigating the adaptive mechanisms of the green crab along the west coast of North America, where it has shown extensive dispersal in the last decade despite minimal genetic diversity. The study was published recently in Molecular Ecology and is a collaboration between WHOI, the University of California at Davis, Portland State University, and the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. (Phys.org)

5 weeds a Northwest horticulturist says you should try eating
Dandelion, white clover, purslane, creeping woodsorrel and bittercress. Monika Spykerman reports. (Columbian)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  247 AM PDT Wed Sep 15 2021   
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS EVENING
  
TODAY
 NW wind to 10 kt becoming W 15 to 25 kt in the  afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less building to 2 to 4 ft in the  afternoon. W swell 6 ft at 10 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 15 to 25 kt becoming NW 5 to 15 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 to 4 ft subsiding to 2 ft or less after  midnight. NW swell 6 ft at 10 seconds.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

9/14 English sparrow, pregnant orcas, Tumwater hatchery, pinto abalone, Canada climate issues, shorebird migration, old growth protest, Mount Polley mine, dying deer

English sparrow [All About Birds]



English sparrow Passer domesticus
The House Sparrow is perhaps the most adaptable and prolific bird species on the planet. Often called English Sparrow, its scientific name Passer domesticus is Latin for small, active bird belonging to the house. It is native to Europe and has spread to all corners of the world. Its adaptation follows human civilization.  Where there are people, there are House Sparrows. (Whitescarver)

With 3 pregnant J pod orcas, boaters told to keep away
With three pregnant J pod orcas in local waters, boaters are being asked to keep their distance and commercial tour operators are being told to stay at least a nautical half-mile from the whales. The intention of the rule is to help the pregnant whales, J36, J37 and J19, carry their pregnancies to full terms. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

Renovated Tumwater salmon hatchery ready to welcome over 3.8 million chinook annually
Located in Brewery Park at Tumwater Falls in Tumwater, WA. the renovated facility features an easily accessible elevated viewing walking path and a series of glass observation windows located in the lower level for up-close viewing. Steve Bloom reports. (Olympian)

Recovery effort aims to restore pinto abalone mollusks that once flourished in Salish Sea
Tiny as a fingernail, these babies don’t look like much. But there is a lot of hope riding on their progress. These pinto abalone are being raised by the tens of thousands in dozens of 30-gallon tanks at the Seattle Aquarium. It’s a conservation venture to restore a native species at grave risk of extinction in the Salish Sea. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

Where Canada’s federal parties stand on three big climate and environment issues ahead of the election h
Canadians who watched the English-language leaders’ debate learned little about the differences between the climate policies of Justin Trudeau’s Liberals, Erin O’Toole’s Conservatives, Jagmeet Singh’s NDP and Annamie Paul’s Greens. Here’s what the federal election debate missed. Emma Gilchrist writes. (The Narwhal)

Flying by the Fat of the Sea
Scientists may have cracked an essential secret of shorebirds’ marathon migrations.  Amorina Kingdon reports. (Hakai Magazine)

Old-growth forestry protesters in Nanaimo say unchecked climate change is a death sentence
Protesters stood on blocks of ice under a mock gallows with nooses around their necks in front of the Nanaimo Courthouse today. Dan Woodward, Chrissie Rousseau and Howard Breen were among a group of about 50 people including members of Extinction Rebellion Nanaimo who assembled on Front Street on Monday, Sept. 13, to protest old-growth logging, Indigenous peoples’ rights and the RCMP’s enforcement of a court injunction against protesters blocking roads leading into the Fairy Creek watershed. Chris Bush reports. (Nanaimo News Bulletin) Fairy Creek protesters sue logging company after vehicles towed, $2,500 demanded for release  Akshay Kulkarni reports. (CBC)

Mount Polley loses appeal of $9,000 penalty for violating new wastewater permit
The Environmental Appeal Board found the mining company responsible for the worst mining disaster in Canadian history has failed to investigate and test long-term water treatment systems at the Mount Polley mine site, which currently relies on discharging waste into Quesnel Lake, one of the world’s deepest glacial lakes and a source of drinking water. Judith Lavoie reports. (The Narwhal)

Northwest deer dying of drought-related viral disease
More white-tailed deer are dying in the Northwest of viruses that often cause more die-offs after hot summers and droughts. While numbers could continue to climb, lab testing has found more white-tailed deer than normal have been infected with either bluetongue or epizootic hemorrhagic disease, known as EHD. Deer contract both viruses from biting gnats, commonly known as “no-see-ums.” Courtney Flatt reports. (NW News Network)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  216 AM PDT Tue Sep 14 2021   
TODAY
 NE wind to 10 kt becoming E in the afternoon. Wind waves  1 ft or less. W swell 3 ft at 10 seconds. Showers likely in the  morning then rain in the afternoon. 
TONIGHT
 SW wind 5 to 15 kt becoming W 10 to 20 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 1 to 3 ft. W swell 4 ft at 14 seconds. A  chance of rain.


--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow on Twitter. 

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Monday, September 13, 2021

9/13 China rockfish, BC old growth, Sunshine Coast, Western redcedar, California salmon, rec shellfish closure, WA wildfires


China rockfish [Jeanne Luce/WikiCommons]


China rockfish Sebastes nebulosus
China rockfish are found from Kechemak Bay, Cook Inlet, Alaska, to San Nicolas Island in southern California. They are found at water depths between 3 and 128 m (10-420 ft). This is a solitary species inhabiting high-energy, high-relief rocky outcrops with numerous crevices. They are very territorial and rarely move less than 10 m (33 ft) from their home site. China rockfish can grow up to 45 cm (18 in) in length. Maximum age is at least 79 years old. (WDFW)

B.C. government continues logging of old growth as 2-year protest in the woods drags on
The battle at Fairy Creek, a fight over some of the planet’s oldest trees, has raged for two summers and has led to the most arrests ever for a protest in modern Canadian history. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times) RCMP make 27 more arrests at B.C. old-growth logging blockades  RCMP say officers have made 989 arrests since enforcement began around the Fairy Creek watershed (Canadian Press) Police treatment of Indigenous protesters differs starkly from white protesters, experts say  Angela Sterritt reports. (CBC)

More old-growth logging deferrals coming, says B.C. on anniversary of review promising forestry overhaul
B.C's Forests Ministry says more deferrals for old growth logging will soon be announced as officials work toward meeting 14 changes the province committed to a year ago over how large, old trees in ecologically rich landscapes are logged. Chad Pawson reports. (CBC)

No longer a rainforest: B.C.’s Sunshine Coast improvises to survive long-term drought
Farmers, gardeners, brewers and regional managers are banding together in a beautiful partnership to both store and distribute water across the extraordinarily parched coastal region, just north of Vancouver. As the area’s reservoirs continue to shrink, residents are experimenting with new ways to manage their relationship with watersheds. Judith Lavoie reports. (The Narwhal)

An iconic tree is dying off in Whatcom — what’s causing it and how can you help save it?
The grim reaper is coming for the region’s Western redcedar. Across the Pacific Northwest, a concerning number of the species are dying, forest health experts say. And they’ve determined a likely culprit: climate change, caused by the massive amounts of greenhouse gases humans have pumped into the planet’s atmosphere. Ysbella Kempe reports. (Bellingham Herald/paywall)

California’s disappearing salmon
The drought, along with man-made impediments, has placed the state’s wild Chinook population at grave risk. Scott Wilson reports. (Washington Post)

Recreational shellfish harvesting closed because of health risks
While the commercial harvesting of oysters has been closed in Samish Bay since July 16 because of the presence of the illness-causing bacteria vibrio, the recreational harvesting of shellfish was also closed this week on area beaches. The state Department of Health announced Thursday the closure of recreational shellfish harvesting in south Skagit Bay, Similk Bay and Deception Pass. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Scorched Earth: Why Washington wildfires are getting bigger
The wildfire trends are unmistakable in Washington state and around the western United States. There are more wildfires, they are bigger and they are more and more devastating. "Scorched Earth" examines how climate change and old forest management practices are impacting wildfires now – and how new practices may lead us out. Glenn Farley reports. (KING)


Now, your tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  215 AM PDT Mon Sep 13 2021   
TODAY
 Light wind becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves less than 1 ft becoming 2 ft or less in the afternoon. W  swell 3 ft at 10 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming to 10 kt after midnight.  Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 3 ft at 9 seconds. A chance of  rain after midnight.


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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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