Friday, June 19, 2015

6/19 Oil transport, oil trains, US Open, cleanup, sturgeons, rockfish, Vic sewer, goose cull

 Play Chambers Bay (Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images/CBS)
Increasing oil transport threatens orcas with extinction, Vancouver conference told
Increased transport of oil in the Salish Sea — including from the planned expansion of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline — is putting endangered southern resident killer whales at risk of extinction from a spill, a Washington state official said Thursday. Don Noviello, a biologist with the Washington department of fish and wildlife, said the worst-case scenario would be a spill occurring when three pods get together to form a “superpod” representing the majority of the estimated population of 80. “They’re on the brink and need all the protection they can get,” he told the Clean Pacific conference, a spill-prevention and response convention in Vancouver. “One ill-timed oil spill could be the event that pushes this population over the brink to extinction. Larry Pynn reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Battle Over New Oil Train Standards Pits Safety Against Cost
The federal government's new rules aimed at preventing explosive oil train derailments are sparking a backlash from all sides. The railroads, oil producers and shippers say some of the new safety requirements are unproven and too costly, yet some safety advocates and environmental groups say the regulations aren't strict enough and still leave too many people at risk. David Schaper reports. (NPR)

Environmentalist Group Plans To Protest Chambers Bay U.S. Open
….Besides the criticism about the actual layout of the golf course, much fodder has been drawn from the fact that freight trains run through the golf course on a popular route along the Puget Sound. Reports have stated that an average of 60 trains per day make their way through the course and will continue to do so at their usual rate throughout the duration of one of golf’s biggest tournaments. While this might be quirky of flat out funny for some, it’s troublesome and a major point of contention for others. The People’s Climate Action Fleet, an environmentalist group based in Seattle, Washington, have organized a protest, specifically targeting the trains that carry oil and other potentially damaging materials through the the area. The protest is scheduled to take place in the Puget Sound on Sunday, June 21. Bryan Altman repots. (CBS)

If you like to watch: Western Canada Marine shows how it cleans up oil spills in B.C.  
There have already been two oil spills this year in and around B.C., and the unfortunate reality is it will likely happen again.  CBC got a look at Western Canada Marine, the company commissioned with cleanup of environmentally dangerous slicks, as it showed off some of its technology. (CBC) See also: Anacortes refineries practice oil spill response  Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Sturgeon scientist battles huge fish in Fraser River to implant tracking device
You might call Erin Stoddard the surgeon to the sturgeon. The B.C. government biologist often finds himself chest deep in the mighty Fraser River, scalpel in hand, carrying out operations on live fish weighing hundreds of kilograms. It's all part of his job solving the mysteries of the province's largest freshwater sport fish. The white sturgeon and its relatives are remarkable survivors. They've endured 200 million years of global climate change and continue to eke out an existence in the face of serious modern day threats. Greg Rasmussen reports. (CBC)

Research on rockfish in Puget Sound reveals intriguing findings
Chris Dunagan writes; "This week’s announcement that the coastal population of canary rockfish had dramatically rebounded got me to wondering what new information might be coming from research on the threatened and endangered rockfish of Puget Sound. Dayv Lowry, research scientist at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, shared some intriguing new information about Puget Sound rockfish that could link into the coastal population. In fact, if limited genetic findings hold up, a delisting of one type of Puget Sound rockfish could be in order." (Watching Our Water Ways)

Now the westside: 20 potential sewage-plant sites selected
Twenty “technically feasible” sewage treatment sites on the westside were identified on Thursday by Esquimalt Mayor Barb Desjardins and Colwood Mayor Carol Hamilton, who now want the public to weigh in on the options. The mix of private, public and First Nations properties includes two sites in Langford, 12 in Colwood, one in View Royal, four in Esquimalt and one on Esquimalt First Nations property. Bill Cleverley reports. (Times Colonist)

Capital region’s goose cull a first — but probably not the last
This month’s planned cull of 250 resident Canada geese represents a first for Vancouver Island and the Lower Mainland, Capital Regional District directors have been told. But if some of them have their way, it won’t be the last. Some are so keen to clear Canada geese from parks and playing fields, they are willing to use gas tax grants to pay for culls. Bill Cleverley reports. (Times Colonist)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 230 AM PDT FRI JUN 19 2015
TODAY
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 9 SECONDS. CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
TONIGHT AND SAT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 2 FT AT 8 SECONDS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 5 SECONDS.
SUN
VARIABLE WIND 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 5 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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