Friday, June 12, 2015

6/12 Sea Aquarium, Shell $, Hood Canal, more coal, BC LNG, Vic sewer, saving steelhead, EPA rule, parking lot

Seattle Aquarium
Seattle Aquarium aims to make splash with huge expansion
The Seattle Aquarium is planning a grand expansion that will add at least 40 percent more exhibit space and cost at least $90 million to build. The expanded aquarium will be equipped to attract nearly twice as many visitors as today along the future park-like post-viaduct waterfront. Steve Goldsmith reports. (Puget Sound Business Journal)

Port commissioner getting donations from executives involved in Shell deal
As Port of Seattle Commissioner Bill Bryant raises money for his gubernatorial campaign, he’s getting help from executives in companies involved in the deal to bring Shell Oil drilling equipment to a Seattle port terminal. Bryant, a Republican who declared his run last month to challenge Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee, has received $2,500 in campaign donations from Paul Stevens, CEO of Foss Maritime, according to campaign filings. Records also show that Mark Tabbutt, listed as the chairman of Saltchuk Resources, the maritime conglomerate that owns Foss, has given $1,500. Joseph O'Sullivan reports. (Seattle Times)

New website reveals strategies for improving Hood Canal ecosystem
If you want to know how the Hood Canal Coordinating Council is working to protect and restore Hood Canal, take a look at a new website created by the council. It is called OurHoodCanal.org. The website is an attractive and functional companion to the “Hood Canal Integrated Watershed Plan” (PDF 325 kb), a five-year strategic plan focused on programs that can be accomplished by the coordinating council and its members. Hood Canal Coordinating Council is made up of county commissioners from Kitsap, Mason and Jefferson counties, along with leaders from the Skokomish and Port Gamble S’Klallam tribes. Christopher Dunagan reports. (Watching Our Water Ways)

Coal is coming: Wyoming company aims to ship 24M tons of coal through Washington ports
If the terminals in Longview and Bellingham are approved, more than 20 million tons of coal a year could move through them. That's just from one company. Washington state is well positioned to become the next major hub for oil and gas refinement and exporting because of its proximity to Asia. Now, the coal industry wants in on the action. Wyoming-based Cloud Peak Energy Resources LLC (NYSE: CLD), a major player in U.S. coal mining, wants to see the contentious proposed Gateway Pacific Terminal in Bellingham and Millennium Bulk Terminal in Longview, Wash. developed. Then, it wants to use the terminals to ship huge quantities of coal to Asia. Sarah Aitchison reports. (Puget Sound Business Journal)

Petronas-led group gives conditional okay for B.C. LNG project
A Malaysian-led consortium has given conditional approval to press ahead with plans to export B.C. liquefied natural gas. State-owned Petronas and its Asian partners said Thursday that the Pacific NorthWest LNG joint venture will proceed, subject to the completion this fall of a federal environmental assessment of the terminal to be built near Prince Rupert in northern British Columbia…. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) launched its review of Pacific NorthWest LNG in April, 2013, but has halted the process several times since then because the regulator sought more information from the proponent. Brent Jang reports. (Globe and Mail)

Eight sites favoured for Victoria’s sewage plant
Eight sites, including Clover Point and the University of Victoria, are considered to have a high level of public support for at least a secondary sewage-treatment plant, according to results of a public consultation. Victoria, Saanich and Oak Bay are in the midst of deciding where to build a sewage-treatment plant with the hope of narrowing down sites by the end of this month…. The eight top-ranked sites are: four spots in the Rock Bay area, including a public works yard, sites owned by B.C. Hydro and Transport Canada, and privately owned land; coast guard land beside Ogden Point; Clover Point; the University of Victoria; and the Saanich public works yard. Cindy E. Harnett reports. (Times Colonist)

Steeled courage from state lawmakers needed for steelhead habitat
A last legislative push is needed to save Nisqually River’s storied steelhead run. If you want to know why Puget Sound salmon are disappearing, you need to head upstream. In the case of the Nisqually River’s vanishing wild steelhead, 40 miles upstream. It’s here, high on the western flank of Mount Rainier, you’ll find Busy Wild Creek, the upper reach for spawning steelhead. Mark Higgins writes. (Seattle Times) See also: Fate of Pierce County’s steelhead in the balance  Matt Driscoll writes. (Tacoma News Tribune)

Clean Water Rule Celebrated As Advocates Launch Renewed Campaign To Keep It Intact
The wetlands and tributaries which supply major waterways also must be protected, the federal Environmental Protection Agency ruled last month when it expanded the Clean Water Act to regulate upstream pollution.  This expansion the landmark 1972 environmental law -- which has joint backing from the Army Corps of Engineers -- was celebrated in Seattle Thursday by a handful of  environmental advocacy groups including WASHPIRG  and Environment Washington.  They joined EPA Region 10 Administrator Dennis McLerran  at the Fremont Brewing Company to talk about the importance of clean water for businesses such as micro-breweries and agriculture. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KPLU)

County shows off its low-impact development parking lot
When Skagit County Public Works employee Randy Nelson released 2,200 gallons of water from the holding tank of a water truck Thursday, some onlookers had the urge to flee to keep from getting their feet wet. But they didn’t have to. The water disappeared in seconds into the surface of a parking lot outside the Skagit County government offices, leaving only a ring of alder seeds as proof it was spilled. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT FRI JUN 12 2015
TODAY
NW WIND 10 TO 15 KT...BECOMING W 10 TO 20 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 9 FT AT 14 SECONDS...
 SUBSIDING TO 6 FT AT 14 SECONDS IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...EASING TO 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 12 SECONDS.
SAT
W WIND 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 5 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
SUN
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 10 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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