Tuesday, September 30, 2014

9/30 Seattle waterfront, indoor air, train notification, Enbridge challenge, BC kokanee

Kokanee salmon (BC Environment/Vancouver Sun)
With costs up, mayor wants to roll back Seattle waterfront plan
Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says the city should save money by scaling back its ambitious downtown waterfront-redevelopment plan — including a proposed swimming-pool barge. In a presentation to the City Council on Monday, Murray staffers said cost estimates have gone up, and the plan would eat up about $200 million more than previously thought unless modifications are made. That’s partly because much of the work can’t begin until the Highway 99 tunnel is completed and the Alaskan Way Viaduct is brought down. David Beekman reports. (Seattle Times)

EPA working with South Seattle residents to clean up air quality inside homes
The EPA is teaming up with the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition to help homeowners clean up the air indoors. "This area of South Park and Georgetown have some of the worst air quality anywhere in the city. Also higher rates of asthma (than) anywhere in the city," said James Rasmussen, coordinator for the Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition. He said back in July the nonprofit entered into a cooperative agreement with the federal agency, which contributed $120,000 for the cause. The money will go toward in-home air quality assessments for residents primarily in South Park and Georgetown. David Ham reports. (KIRO)

Senators ask for more oil train notifications
Four West Coast senators are asking the federal government to expand a recent order for railroads to notify state emergency responders of crude oil shipments. The letter, sent Monday to U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx, says railroads should supply states with advanced notification of all high-hazard flammable liquid transports — including crude from outside the Bakken region of North Dakota and Montana, as well as ethanol and 71 other liquids. The letter was signed by Oregon senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, and California senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer. Gosia Wozniacka reports. (Associated Press)

BC First Nation wins bid to challenge pipeline
A First Nation from British Columbia's North Coast says the Federal Court of Appeal has agreed to hear its legal challenge of the Northern Gateway pipeline project. The Gitxaala Nation filed the court action in July over a federal cabinet decision to approve the project that would link the Alberta oilsands with a marine terminal on the B.C. coast. The Gitxaala say it has now been given the green light for a judicial review of the controversial $7-billion pipeline project proposed by Calgary-based Enbridge (TSX:ENB). The First Nation is challenging the Joint Review Panel report that the government based its decision for approval on, claiming Canada failed to provide reasonable accommodation and consultation over aboriginal rights and title. (Canadian Press)

Genomic tools eyed to reverse kokanee fishery collapse
New genomic tools are being developed in an attempt to halt and reverse the “invisible collapse” of B.C.’s kokanee salmon stocks. Funding from Genome BC, the provincial government and local stakeholders will be used to identify unique regional stocks and migratory patterns, and to support hatchery programs aimed at bringing the province’s landlocked freshwater salmon back from the brink. Randy Shore reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 1215 AM PDT TUE SEP 30 2014
TUE AND TUE NIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS.
 W SWELL 6 FT AT 10 OR 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.

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