Monday, September 8, 2014

9/8 L120, toxic fish, Strait sewage, Elwha fish, oil spill mapping, Canadian forests, sea star wasting, Adventuress

L120 & pod ( PHOTO: Dave Ellifrit, Center for Whale Research)
Orca calf born to Puget Sound resident L pod
The Center for Whale Research is celebrating the birth of an orca calf in the Salish Sea, the first one since 2012. The proud mother is 23-year-old L86, and this is her second calf. The newborn has been designated L120. Susan Wyatt reports. (KING)

Tribes reject Inslee's water quality plan, will ask EPA to act
An alliance of tribes is rejecting Gov. Jay Inslee’s approach to revising the state's water quality standards and will ask the Environmental Protection Agency to enact new rules for Washington. The Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission sent Inslee a letter on Thursday in which members express their “dissatisfaction” with a proposal they say won’t change the status quo. “The tribes’ principal objective for revised water quality standards is to protect the health of future generations, and we have determined that your proposal does not meet this goal,” reads the letter. Jerry Cornfield reports. (Everett Herald)

Ron Judd in "The Wrap" writes: "Brown Trout Derby Update: Port Angeles accidentally released about a million gallons of “insufficiently disinfected effluent” into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Across the “natural toilet” known as the Strait, giddy Victoria, B.C., officials promptly invited the town to become an official Sewage Sister City." (Seattle Times)

Fish migrate into upper Elwha River for first time in century
Fish have migrated into the upper Elwha River for the first time in a century.  Olympic National Park biologists confirmed last week that two radio-tagged bull trout had migrated from the lower river through the former area of Glines Canyon Dam and reached at least as far as Rica Canyon above the former Lake Mills, some 15½ miles from the mouth of the Elwha River.  Four bull trout had been detected earlier as they passed a telemetry station upriver from the former Glines dam.  Leah Leach reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

DFO looking to map ocean floor of B.C. to prep for potential tanker spills
Fisheries and Oceans Canada is looking for someone to map the ocean floor near the British Columbia coast, an area it says could be affected by spills with the expected increase in tanker traffic. The department issued a request for proposals Friday for mapping the floor of the Pacific Ocean around the Haida Gwaii archipelago, and the Queen Charlotte and Johnstone straits. DFO also wants an update to the current map for the Strait of Georgia, between the mainland and Vancouver Island. (Canadian Press)

Canada's degradation of pristine, intact forests leads world
The world's precious few remaining large forests are fragmenting at an alarming rate, and the degradation in Canada leads the world, a new analysis shows. The degradation of such pristine "intact" forests threatens species such as Canada's woodland caribou and Asia's tigers that rely on huge unbroken expanses of natural ecosystems in order to survive, said Nigel Sizer, global director of forest programs with the World Resources Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based research institute focused on resource sustainability. Emily Chung reports. (CBC)

Sea stars wasting in local waters
Witnesses describe the phenomenon as a grisly scene. Colorful creatures hang limp, lose their limbs and eventually disintegrate. Sea star wasting syndrome has baffled beach-goers and scientists along the West Coast, including observers of Skagit County’s marine shorelines, over the past year. Researchers say what causes the disease, how it’s spread and whether the dwindling populations of sea stars will recover still isn’t certain. But it has ravaged the invertebrates along Washington’s coast, including the Salish Sea, which escaped its grasp for the greater part of the year. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Her 'voice': Tall ship Adventuress officially gets its long lost bell back
The 101-year old Adventuress has been reunited with its original bell. The lost bell, recently discovered and brought to Port Townsend in June, was installed onto the historical ship in a 15-minute ceremony over the weekend. “The Adventuress is a very lucky boat,” said Port Townsend Mayor David King during the ceremony, which drew about 400 spectators to City Dock. Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT MON SEP 8 2014
TODAY
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 7 SECONDS. AREAS OF DRIZZLE AND FOG IN THE MORNING. A CHANCE OF
 SHOWERS IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 7 SECONDS.

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