Wednesday, May 7, 2014

5/7 Herring, Hoyt, Frank Jr., Kinder Morgan, BC crabs, species at risk, North Creek, Shell train, building ban, giant squid

Pacific herring roe (Herring School)
New blog: On The Subject of Herring
There’s a new website from Herring School that will tell you almost everything you need to know about Pacific herring. Well, almost everything. Pacific Herring Past, Present and Future will show you why herring is important in the ecosystem, in culture, in the economy— and how climate, harvest and habitat determine the species’ future.

Erich Hoyt on The Whale Trail in Port Townsend and Port Angeles May 7 and 8
Whale expert and author Erich Hoyt talks whales on May 7 at the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s annual meeting and on May 8 at the Port Angeles Red Lion Inn. Brown Paper Tickets

If you like to watch: Salmon Fights Lingcod (Vancouver Island)
Wow!

Some fine words have been said about Billy Frank, Jr. Tony Angell said Billy was one of a kind. "Made you feel that he had looked forward all day to seeing you when you finally got together.  Sincere, knowledge based and genuinely rooted to place.  His model will inspire for a long time but it will be difficult to match." More fine words from Chris Dunagan, To many, Billy Frank will remain an unforgettable force,  and from Martha Kongsgaard, A remembrance of Billy Frank Jr.

Group calls on NEB to revise Kinder Morgan hearing proceedings
National Energy Board restrictions on who can participate in the Kinder Morgan pipeline review are being challenged by a group of people who say they have been robbed of their right to free speech. In a notice of motion, the NEB is being asked to reject as unconstitutional recent federal legislative changes to the National Energy Board Act that limit public participation in hearings on Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion proposal.... The motion was filed on Tuesday by eight individuals and ForestEthics Advocacy Association, an environmental organization. If the NEB rejects it, the applicants say they will take the case to Federal Court. Mark Hume reports. (Globe and Mail)

Canadian Dungeness crab doubles in price
Canadian Dungeness crab prices are skyrocketing, as B.C. fishermen try to meet growing demand for the luxury crustacean in China. The crab variety has become hugely popular in high-end Shanghai restaurants, leading most crab buyers in Vancouver to ship to China rather than sell locally. Duncan Cameron, who has been fishing for Dungeness crab off the coast of B.C. for years, says within moments of arriving at the Granville Island dock, his entire catch is gone. (CBC)

Species at risk in waters off Parksville Qualicum Beach double
The number of species at risk in the waters off Parksville Qualicum Beach has doubled in the last 10 years, according to a SeaDoc report unveiled at the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference in Seattle last week. The report states that scientists recorded 119 at-risk species in 2013, up from 60 in 2002 — leading environmentalists to call for a special international body to co ordinate research and conservation in the three bodies of water that make up the Salish Sea: the Strait of Georgia, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Puget Sound. "The border is a false line," said SSEC executive director Christianne Wilhelmson. "We (Canada and the United States) need to connect." Candace Wu reports. (Parksville Qualicum Beach News)

Bothell’s Friends of North Creek Forest Work Day May 10
Whale Scout Helpin' Out invites you to a restoration work party at North Creek Forest in Bothell 10 am to 2 pm. To save the whales, it takes salmon and to save salmon, it takes healthy creeks, streams and forests. Orca recovery begins in the tree tops. Save whales and the forest.

Shell Anacortes rail project target of regional oil-by-rail concerns
Skagit County officials should take action to prevent explosive oil trains from rolling through Skagit Valley farm fields, splitting downtown Mount Vernon and Burlington, and crossing the Skagit River and valuable marine waters. That was the message locals and visitors from Seattle, Bellingham and other Western Washington communities shared with the Skagit County Commissioners Tuesday. The group gathered largely in opposition to an oil-by-rail proposal at the Shell refinery in Anacortes. The proposal is the last of four projects to bring more oil to refineries in Whatcom County and Skagit County from the Bakken fields in North Dakota. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Snohomish County retreats from proposed slide building ban
Snohomish County has backed away from a proposed moratorium on home construction in landslide-prone areas. Instead, county officials said Monday they’ll consider less sweeping measures, such as wider setbacks and additional geotechnical studies for homebuilding near hillsides. The emergency moratorium, floated last month by Snohomish County Council Chairman Dave Somers, would have halted new building permits for residential construction within a half-mile of hills considered landslide hazard zones. Jim Brunner reports. (Seattle Times)

If you like to watch: How we found the giant squid
Humankind has been looking for the giant squid (Architeuthis) since we first started taking pictures underwater. But the elusive deep-sea predator could never be caught on film. Oceanographer and inventor Edith Widder shares the key insight — and the teamwork — that helped to capture the squid on film for the first time. (TED Talks)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT WED MAY 7 2014
TODAY
SW WIND TO 10 KT...BECOMING W 10 TO 20 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS...BUILDING TO 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT...BECOMING SW AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 FT AT 11 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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