Tuesday, May 13, 2014

5/13 Ice sheet melt, Kinder Morgan, Erich Hoyt, 'Granny,' logging, slides, ocean health, sewage sniff, trail talk

Rescued, rehabed river otter released at Port Renfrew
(BC SPCA Wild ARC/Times Colonist)
UW researchers: Polar ice sheet doomed, but how soon?
It’s too late to halt the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet into the sea, triggering several feet of sea-level rise, scientists have found. But UW researchers say the speed of that collapse depends on our response to climate change. Craig Welch reports. (Seattle Times)

Kinder Morgan pipeline questions raised by B.C.
The British Columbia government has questions for Kinder Morgan about the proposed expansion of its Trans Mountain pipeline through the province. After reviewing the company's application to the National Energy Board, the province submitted 70 requests Monday for more information on oil spill prevention and response plans on land and at sea. Under revised federal rules, the province and hundreds of other interveners will not be allowed to directly cross-examine company experts on their testimony at the review hearings. Instead, they must submit information requests in advance.

Erich Hoyt on The Whale Trail
Killer whale expert and author Erich Hoyt completes Orca Tour 2014 with presentations in Seattle on May 18 and in Vancouver BC on May 20. Hoyt is the author of the books, Orca: The Whale Called Killer and Marine Protected Areas for Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises, and will speak on “Adventures with Orcas in the North Pacific—From A1 Stubbs to Iceberg, the White Russian Bull.” Tickets for Seattle are at Brown Paper Tickets; the Vancouver event is free.

World's oldest orca, 103-year-old 'Granny,' spotted off B.C. coast
Whale researchers had an extra happy Mother’s Day on news that the world’s oldest known orca has survived another year. J2, also known as "Granny," estimated by The Center for Whale Research to be 103 years old, was sighted Friday by Pacific Whale Watch Association crews. The matriarch of the Southern Resident Community is believed to have been with her pod just eight days ago off the coast of California near the mouth of the Russian River. (KING)

New timber-harvest rules not enough, state board told
An environmental attorney Monday asked Washington state to adopt an emergency rule to temporarily ban logging around landslide-prone areas in the wake of the deadly Oso disaster. Testifying at a meeting called by the Forest Practices Board, Peter Goldman of the Washington Forest Law Center said new guidelines for proposed timber harvests near landslide-hazard areas “are welcome steps in the right direction, but they’re hardly enough.” Under the requirements issued Friday by Commissioner of Public Lands Peter Goldmark, applicants who want a harvest permit will need to provide a detailed site review by a qualified geologist if the state determines that logging near unstable slopes could affect public safety. But Goldman said the new requirements do not identify the locations of deep-seated landslides or how logging can be conducted safely in those areas. (Associated Press) See also: USGS Geologist Doubts Cause Of Oso Landslide Will Ever Be Pinned Down  Tom Banse reports (KPLU) See also: Landslide risk prompts warning to Pemberton-area homeowners Kelly Sinoski reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Community Forum on Ocean Health http://www.snocomrc.org/uploads/Event%20Flyers/Ocean_Health-Everett-051414_FINAL.pdf
The Snohomish Marine Resources Committee convenes guest speakers Dr. Terrie Klinger, Betsy Peabody, and MRC members Simon Geerlofs and Franchesca Perez to talk about ocean health. May 14, 6:30 p.m., Everett Station, Weyerhaeuser Room.

Dogs sniff out bacteria contamination in Kirkland waterways
The City of Kirkland is calling in the dogs to help figure out a bacteria problem in their waterways. Juanita Creek is a five mile stretch of water that moves through the heart of Kirkland before flowing into Lake Washington. Over the next two days the city's Department of Public Works is taking water samples along the route to try and determine if and where harmful bacteria is getting in.... the Kirkland and King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks have hired specially trained dogs from Environmental Canine Services Inc.  The dogs will be specifically be searching for human fecal matter. Roberta Romero reports. (KING)

Telling tales on the Tommy Thompson
The Anacortes waterfront and waters of Fidalgo Bay have a rich history, including native cultures, wildlife, the growth of the local economy through the timber industry and projects to repair environmental damage. About two dozen locals walked the Tommy Thompson Trail Thursday to explore a piece of that history with the Friends of Skagit Beaches Trail Tales program. Friends of Skagit Beaches President Betty Carteret introduced the day’s theme as “a legacy of toxic contamination” that has been repaired at the historic Custom Plywood mill site near 34th Street through the state’s cleanup efforts. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT TUE MAY 13 2014
TODAY
E WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 2 TO 4 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
TONIGHT AND WED
VARIABLE WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 TO 4 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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