Thursday, October 18, 2012

10/18 Stormwater, ocean fertilization, Puget Sound encyclopedia, Japanese Gulch salmon, Vic sewage

What Sank People For Puget Sound?
New blog: “My colleague Joan Crooks of Washington Environmental Council wrote me a nice email on Monday dressed up just like a message from People For Puget Sound. She even got the typography of capitalizing the “F” in “For” right. Maybe it was meant to be new wine in old skin or maybe old wine in new skin or old wine in old skin —somebody help me here— but it just tasted weird and strange...” Saving Puget Sound: Brand, Re-brand, No Brand

At least since the 1970s, scientists and engineers have been devising methods to intercept contaminant-laced rainwater that sloughs off hard surfaces. Yet these methods still are not widely mandated, making stormwater a leading reason the Clean Water Act –- passed into law 40 years ago today -– has failed to meet its goals. Robert McClure reports. If Green Roofs And Rain Gardens Are So Great, Why Aren’t There More?   See also: Urban stormwater runoff beat out a number of other water pollution sources as a top concern in a poll commissioned by EarthFix and conducted by Davis, Hibbitts & Midghall (DHM Research). EarthFix Poll: Do NW Residents Care About Stormwater?

Government bodies knew about a controversial experimental project in which 100 tonnes of a dust-like material enriched with iron was dumped into the ocean off B.C.'s north coast, the project's leader says. John Disney, the president of the Haida Salmon Restoration Corp, which initiated the $2-million ocean fertilization project, told CBC News that various federal government departments were aware of his controversial plan. An experimental project in which 100 tonnes of a dust-like material was dumped into the ocean off B.C.'s north coast is sparking controversy. The chemical compound was dumped about 300 kilometres west of the islands of Haida Gwaii in a process called ocean fertilization.  Iron fertilization project in Pacific known to government  Meanwhile: An ocean iron-dumping experiment, resulting in a massive algae bloom off Haida Gwaii, will provide valuable, previously unattainable data, says John Nightingale, Vancouver Aquarium president. Dumping of iron in the ocean stirs wave of controversy

Representatives of the Encyclopedia of Earth and the Encyclopedia of Life will be on the University of Washington campus Wednesday, Oct. 24, for the public launch of an encyclopedia unique to Puget Sound. Spearheaded by the UW-based Puget Sound Institute, the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound is meant to be a synthesis of the best available information for Puget Sound recovery from experts with state and federal agencies, academic institutions, tribes and organizations. A key starting point for the project, for example, was to incorporate the latest science update from the Puget Sound Partnership, a state agency and encyclopedia partner. Organizers of the online-only encyclopedia want to create a network of researchers and students to provide content that regional scientists will review to ensure it is current and authoritative.  Scientists building crowdsourced encyclopedia to further Puget Sound recovery  

The city of Mukilteo, Paine Field Airport, and Edmonds Community College have won an award from the Puget Sound Regional Council for the Japanese Gulch Fish Passage Improvement Project. The VISION 2040 award recognize innovative projects and programs that help ensure a sustainable future as the region grows. The Japanese Gulch Fish Passage Improvement Project is the result of a partnership to eliminate fish barriers and daylight the Japanese Gulch Creek with the hopes of returning salmon to a stream as part of the environmental mitigation for Paine Field. Japanese Gulch Fish Passage wins vision award  http://mukilteobeacon.villagesoup.com/news/story/japanese-gulch-fish-passage-wins-vision-award/911686

Greater Victoria municipalities are looking at whether a last-ditch attempt to fix underground pipes could cut the bill for sewage treatment, but it's too late to affect the project's $783-million sticker price, they have been told. Politicians on the Capital Regional District's sewage committee mused last week about whether a quick blitz of repairs to leaky pipes, which let rainwater into the system, could cut flow - and costs - to the planned sewage treatment system. New estimates show households could pay between $232 and $391 a year for sewage treatment, depending on the municipality. The treatment system is set to go online in 2018. Sewage: Fixing pipes won't cut treatment bill, official says

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PDT THU OCT 18 2012
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM PDT THIS MORNING THROUGH THIS EVENING
TODAY
E WIND 10 TO 20 KT...RISING TO 15 TO 25 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT...BUILDING TO 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 6
 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN THIS MORNING...THEN RAIN LIKELY IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
S WIND 20 TO 30 KT...BECOMING W 10 TO 15 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 3 TO 5 FT...SUBSIDING TO 1 TO 2 FT. W SWELL 7
 FT AT 10 SECONDS. RAIN...THEN RAIN LIKELY AFTER MIDNIGHT.

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