Tuesday, October 9, 2012

10/9 Orcas, fishermen's coal, ocean acid, Enbridge pipe, watersheds, Port Angeles waterfront, Adventuress wheel

(Photo: Seattle Aquarium)
For those who like to watch: Puget Sound's killer whales have begun venturing south into Central Puget Sound as they do each fall during their annual hunt for chum salmon. J Pod and possibly members of K and L pods were spotted Monday morning off Point No Point in North Kitsap and later in the day off Bainbridge Island, according to Susan Berta of Orca Network. Chris Dunagan reports. Orcas moving south into Puget Sound  When you see them: How to report whale sightings   And watch: Orcas swimming off Point No Point  And: West Seattle Whale Watch: Orca photos, round 1

Tribal and non-tribal fishermen on Monday lined up their boats on their unified opposition to plans for a coal export facility at Cherry Point. A plan to ship coal from Montana and Wyoming to the site near Ferndale for export overseas is currently being studied. Both groups are concerned the plan would increase train traffic that would disrupt the daily lives of citizens. They also worry the increased shipping traffic on the water could increase chances of a major accident and spill in the productive crab and fishing area.  Gary Chittim reports. Lummi Tribe takes on coal plan 

One way to measure the urgency of the scientific response to ocean acidification is by its carbon footprint. In 2004, 125 marine scientists gathered in a single room in Paris to ponder the effects that surging loads of human-generated carbon dioxide into the atmosphere might have on the sea below. They heard 24 research presentations, nearly the sum total of papers published on the subject worldwide that year. Four years later, 227 researchers gathered in Monaco for the second installment, with 44 presentations. Two weeks ago, 542 racked up the air miles to get to Monterey, California for the Third International Symposium on the Ocean in a High-CO2 World. Eric Scigliano reports.  Science faces the fate of the sea    At home: Ocean use planning, acidification subjects of Oct. 10 public meeting

Organizations founded by an American oil baron and a Silicon Valley philanthropist are among the foreign charities being targeted by Enbridge in its battle against critics of the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. Tens of millions of dollars have been donated to conservation groups and initiatives in B.C., for everything from Earth Day celebrations to aboriginal salmon recovery programs. It’s a point of contention for the pipeline proponent, which has asked the environmental review panel examining the Northern Gateway project to compel funding information from its critics. The panel returns to B.C. this week for final hearings on the controversial project. Northern Gateway pipeline critics questioned on Rockefeller foundation, Seattle philanthropist    And: Energy advocate doubts Enbridge’s ability to get Northern Gateway pipeline built  

Hey, this is cool. Finally got a chance to look over what Tony Meyer of Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission sent me and I think you'll find it interesting, too: State of our Watersheds Report

The first phase of the $3.9 million waterfront esplanade began Monday, as crews closed off the western half of Railroad Avenue. Traffic is now blocked on Railroad Avenue between Laurel Street — at the MV Coho ferry terminal — and Oak Street to the west for the start of the $17 million Downtown Waterfront Development Project. Arywn Rice reports. Work begins on Port Angeles waterfront face-lift

Ah, this is sick and sickening: In case someone steals the wooden wheel aboard your 99-year-old schooner, it's good to know there's a spare nearby. The ship's wheel on the Port Townsend-based schooner Adventuress was stolen in Olympia on Saturday night. A loaner wheel was secured in time and installed by Sunday night for a previously scheduled educational program that is the specialty of Sound Experience, the nonprofit that sails the Adventuress. Charlie Bermant reports. Schooner Adventuress wants its wheel back — but using loaner in meantime

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 900 PM PDT MON OCT 8 2012
TUE
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 20 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG IN THE MORNING.
TUE NIGHT
NW WIND 10 TO 20 KT BECOMING W 5 TO 15 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 3 FT AT 18 SECONDS. PATCHY
 FOG AFTER MIDNIGHT.

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