Thursday, February 23, 2012

2/23 Sea lion deaths, cougar diet, Octopus Week, deer cull, geese cull, spill rules, porous pavements, Port Orchard, OR reserves, John's fish book

PHOTO: Vancouver Sun
A West Coast salmon farm has been charged in the drowning deaths of sea lions and seals that became entangled in nets surrounding fish pens. Grieg Seafood BC Ltd., which operates 21 farms on the British Columbia coast, is charged with violating the Fisheries Act at three different locations. Fish farm operator charged over dozens of seal, sea lion deaths

Researchers in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve found in examining cougar scat that deer comprised only a quarter of the cougars’ diet in the park, and that an unlikely smattering of other animals — notably harbour seals and even sea lions — comprised the remainder. “....[D]eer is not the primary prey species,” said Danielle Thompson, park resource management specialist. “It’s a secondary prey item and raccoons are actually No. 1.” Scientists unlock mysteries of the cougar diet

Octopus activities continue at the Aquarium on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. See divers with octopuses at noon and feeding at 4 p.m. daily.  Octopus Week winds up at the Seattle Aquarium

A greater Victoria citizens advisory committee will be set up to gather information on all ways to deal with deer in the region and will be asked to make finding options for agricultural communities its first priority. Three farmers will be on the 12-member advisory committee that will examine the issue, which is causing concern in most of the region's 13 municipalities. Citizens committee on deer backed at CRD meeting

Meanwhile, the Guardians of Mid-Island Estuaries, a group of retired biologists and other scientists, is asking the Parksville city council to increase their three-year funding from $3,000 to $25,000 to address the destruction they believe is being done by Canada geese on local estuary habitat. Funding boost may lead to Parksville geese cull

If you like to watch: The state Department of Ecology is required by a new law passed last year to enhance the state oil spill contingency plan rule by December. The plan is expected to ensure that the state can mount an aggressive, rapid and well-coordinated response in the event of a major oil spill in state waters. An advisory committee begins meeting today from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM in Lacey. Watch on the web here. Informal public comment taken on first draft of new oil spill rule

Lisa Stiffler at Sightlines reports on how stormwater engineers in Gresham OR and Issaquah WA are using permeable pavement -- porous asphalt and pervious concrete-- to help shrink and clean polluted stormwater runoff. The pavement is safer for drivers because it reduces hydroplaning and the glare from wet pavement, and it can save money by eliminating the need for traditional, costly stormwater pipes and retention ponds or vaults. Surprisingly Ambitious Permeable Projects

Port of Bremerton and the city of Port Orchard leaders have come to share a vision to transform the Port Orchard waterfront from a glorified parking lot to a showcase for visitors, with multiple points to get to the beach, to admire the view, and to live and shop. Less parking, more green space envisioned for Port Orchard waterfront

Kudos to the Oregon state House for overwhelmingly approving the bill to expand Oregon's system of marine reserves and to research how they may help better manage commercial fisheries. The vote sends Senate Bill 1510 to the governor, who said he would sign it. Funded by $1.6 million in lottery money, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will spend two years gathering baseline data on marine populations, as well as social and economic impacts on coastal communities, before restrictions go into effect. Ore. Senate Oks bill creating new marine reserves

Wait’s over: A new edition of "John's fishin' book" is out. That’s the Saltwater Fishing Journal, by local tackle shop owner and piscatorial guru John Martinis, owner of John's Sporting Goods in Everett who has spent decades fishing and boating Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands.  Saltwater Journal a must for local anglers

Finally, from ScienceDaily: The more afraid a person is of a spider, the bigger that individual perceives the spider to be, new research suggests. BTW, you can enlarge the photo of the spider in the story. If You're Afraid of Spiders, They Seem Bigger: Phobia's Effect On Perception of Feared Object Allows Fear to Persist

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 230 AM PST THU FEB 23 2012
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS IN EFFECT
TODAY
W WIND 15 TO 25 KT EASING TO 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT SUBSIDING TO 1 OR 2 FT. W SWELL 13 FT AT 13 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF RAIN IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W SWELL 10 FT AT 12 SECONDS. S WIND 5 TO 15 KT RISING TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT BUILDING TO 3 FT. RAIN.

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