Wednesday, February 8, 2012

2/8 Dicks earmarks, Oregon reserves, bag ban, Great Bear, steelhead regs, local plans, Swinomish dredging, magic mud

Snowy Owl Photo: Carl Safina
Carl Safina does Snowy Owls:  Snowy Owls of 2012: The White Album By Carl Safina

Kimberly Kindy of the Washington Post goes deep in reporting on how Rep. Norm Dicks and former Puget Sound Partnership director and son David Dicks worked together, with the congressman directing millions more to Puget Sound recovery, including a $1.82 million earmark and more than $14 million in grants and other funds that went to his son’s agency. There were no competitors for the funds.  "It was a difficult time," the younger Dicks said. "I left a lucrative law practice to help save Puget Sound. No one was expecting the response that me and my father got." Dicks channeled federal money to Puget Sound project his son ran

Cassandra Profita at OPB reports that the Oregon Senate overwhelmingly voted to approve three new marine reserves in state coastal waters that restricts fishing near Cape Falcon, north of Manzanita, Cascade Head, north of Lincoln City, and Cape Perpetua, between Florence and Newport. The bill needs approval from the Oregon House of Representatives and a signature from the governor to become law. Oregon Senate Passes Marine Reserves Bill  

Washington House and Senate bills to ban plastic bags at groceries haven't passed but have lots of support among San Juan County grocers. Banning the bag: Local grocers get on board with banning plastic bags at checkout stands

ForestEthics, the Sierra Club and Greenpeace have charged that the B.C. government is not meeting conservation targets set six years ago in the Great Bear Rainforest agreement to preserve 70 percent of the central coast forest but allow commercial logging on the rest.  The work on a new approach to logging, called eco-system-based management, is behind schedule and only 50 per cent of the land is protected because the government mapwork is incomplete. Eco groups urge government to complete protection promise for Great Bear Rainforest  

The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission met last week and among its actions closed fishing early for steelhead and other game fish in several river systems in Puget Sound and along the Strait of Juan de Fuca to protect wild steelhead. WDFW Commission changes steelhead fishing regulations to protect wild fish

After nearly two years of debate, Kitsap County and its four cities have approved a set of policies to guide their land-use planning efforts, as required by the state's Growth Management Act. County planning policies finally approved   Meanwhile, Whatcom County leaders will decide at a special meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 8, whether to appeal a January 9 state board decision that invalidated zoning and growth policies on 2,575 acres. Whatcom council to consider appealing state board ruling on rural zoning, policies

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ 2012 work plan now includes $2.3 million in federal funding to dredge the Swinomish Channel.  Feds to save Swinomish Channel from silting over

Gooey, paper-thin biofilm can make up to 70 per cent of the diet of small shorebirds, which slurp up the stuff like energy drinks, making it a key bird food. The "magic" in the mud was first uncovered just south of Vancouver where up to half the world's western sandpipers touch down to refuel as they migrate north.  'Magic mud' on tidal flats key to shorebird populations

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 243 AM PST WED FEB 8 2012
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT
TODAY
SE WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 9 FT AT 13 SECONDS. RAIN IN THE MORNING...THEN A CHANCE OF RAIN IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
SE WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. SW SWELL 9 FT AT 11 SECONDS. RAIN.

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3 comments:

  1. The link to article about dredging Swinomish Slough does not work for me.

    I still wonder if your sleuthing can come up with an explanation of why the Swinomish Slough silts up. Is it tidal action? Is it the sloughs that drain into it? Did it silt up "in the old days" or is the silting the result of farming or building or diking or ????

    Maybe the silting could be prevented and thus avoid this endless begging for money to save it by dredging.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Correct link is http://threesheetsnw.com/blog/2012/02/feds-to-save-swinomish-channel-from-silting-over/ I'll see if anyone knows where the silt's coming from.

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  2. According to the Port of Skagit: "Silt from the North Fork of the Skagit River enters the Swinomish Channel from the south end, but there’s also a buildup of silt from Padilla Bay at the north end. In addition, earth occasionally sloughs off of the banks at various points along the length of the channel."

    ReplyDelete