Monday, January 30, 2012

1/30 Shot sea lions, no coal trains, enviro assault, leaded gas, golden sewage, schooled salmon, Groundswell, Pete Knutson

ABC News
Climate scientist Cliff Mass describes how the recent storm damaged two of his “sacred weather sites”-- Ivar's Mukilteo restaurant and the Langley Hill radar. Destruction Hits Two Sacred Weather Locations  

Our Lady of the Slough blogs on the claim headlined in the local paper: "Conservation group gives tour of successful cleanup projects in the Samish Watershed." Red Herrings in the Samish Watershed  

Damn, who does this s**t? Eight sea lions have been found shot dead in the US state of Washington in the past few weeks. Sea lions found shot on Puget Sound, US   

About 200 folks kicked off the "Coal-Free Bellingham" campaign for a citizen initiative to outlaw coal trains through a city ordinance. Hundreds turn out to launch Bellingham anti-coal train initiative  

Rolling back requirements for city storm water controls, writing loopholes into growth management rules and redefining “clean energy” are battleground issues in this let’s-make-a-deal session of the legislature. Environment again a source of friction in Olympia  

John Ryan at KUOW reports on how lead was banned from paint and gasoline, leading to a 90 percent reduction in the amount of lead found in human bloodstreams. But what about the hundreds of thousands of airplane engines that still run on leaded gas? Flying The Leaded Skies: Small Planes Still Pour Lead Into America's Air  

“Cities are huge sinks for nutrients. All the nutrients, all the food we generate are consumed in these cities and it is a great central location to recover those nutrients,” says Phillip Abrary, whose company Ostara Nutrient Recovery Technologies Inc. sifts out nutrients from waste sludge, producing high-value, slow-release phosphorus for fertilizer. Ostara and other companies are convening this week at Cities Summit, a City of Vancouver-sponsored forum looking into ways cities can cope with the growth anticipated over the next four decades.  Vancouver's Cities Summit targets a greener future

“It was really cool because when you first hatch they still look like the egg except their head and tail are out because they still have the sack and use the food inside of it for their first week or two and then it finally goes away and they start looking like fish.” That’s Mahala Mrozek, a student at Seattle’s Viewlands Elementary, one of about 500 schools in Washington involved with the Salmon in Schools program.  Salmon Go To School  

If you like to watch: Take a sneak peek at Groundswell: the wave of opposition to Northern Gateway, a documentary by Chris Darimont, science director for the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, who got inspired while surfing and figured out how surfers could speak for the marine mammals of the Great Bear Rainforest and the threats they would face from oil tankers in northern B.C. waters if the Enbridge Gateway pipeline was approved.  Surfers' documentary speaks for sea life  

“My story begins on November 9, 2011 when, acting on a tip from an unnamed private citizen, a harbor manager for the Port of Seattle reported me as a polluter to the Department of Homeland Security. His report alerted a chain of agencies, including, among others, Customs and the Border Patrol, the Coast Guard, the National Guard, FEMA, NOAA,  EPA, the Washington State Department of Ecology, the Port of Seattle, and the Oregon Titan and Washington State Fusion Centers, federal intelligence clearinghouses created in the aftermath of 9/11.” Fisherman and clean water advocate Pete Knutson on A little oil and a ton of trouble  

Next week’s Feb. 8 Wooden Boat Wednesday talk at Port Townsend's Northwest Maritime Center & Wooden Boat Foundation features Chuck Fowler and Dan Withers, authors of Patrol and Rescue Boats on Puget Sound. Rich history of patrol, rescue boats chronicled  

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 900 AM PST MON JAN 30 2012
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS IN EFFECT
TODAY
W SWELL 10 FT AT 12 SECONDS. SW WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS...INCREASING IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W SWELL 10 FT AT 13 SECONDS. S WIND 10 TO 20 KT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. RAIN.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service.

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