Monday, January 16, 2012

1/16 Snow, lege session, ship discharge, Ocean Policy, Tsawwassen Band, Olympic Park glaciers, new voting maps

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Seattle Times)
Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day!  There are still some holiday weekend events to take part in. Celebrations of MLK's legacy

New blog:Invoking God

New blog
from the Lady of the Slough: “Who’s Going to Clean Up This County?


While Western Washington drivers cope with their first snow of the winter, the National Weather Service says another 1-to-3 inches are possible by Tuesday and another 4-to-8 inches by Wednesday before turning to rain. More snow forecast by Wednesday across Washington

Snow has once again started falling on Metro Vancouver this morning, with the regional cold spell expected to continue through much of the week.  Snow flurries and bitter weather set to continue across Metro Vancouver  

And, if you’re still interested in the white stuff, Cliff Mass blogs on Interesting Differences in Local Snow

Listen up: Martha Baskin of Green Acre Radio reports on whether the environmental community’s top priorities for the 2012 legislative session can be sustained under the most intense attacks the community has seen in decades remains to be seen. Pollution Free Prosperity: Is It Possible in an Economy that looks like this?

If you want to see some of the action first hand, register for the January 25 annual Environmental Lobby Day
.


Fred Felleman with Friends of the Earth describes why the cruise ship industry should support new regulations banning discharge of treated sewage and graywater from cruise ships within 3 miles of the coast of Washington and Puget Sound.  New Regs Proposed For Cruise Ship Wastewater in Washington

The National Oceans Policy now has an action plan with a goal to base decisions on how the nation’s shorelines are used on solid science and on a philosophy of openness and responsiveness to all interests.  Whew.  Toward a National Coastline Policy

The Way of Whales annual workshop to be held January 28 at the Camp Casey Conference Center in Coupeville brings together whale experts and educators. Register here. 

Tsawwassen First Nation’s land settlement treaty expanded its land holdings in the fertile farmlands of the Fraser Delta. In a few weeks the band will pave over and begin transforming the land into subdivisions, an industrial park and the second-largest shopping mall complex in the province. “We are no longer a colony. We can make our own decisions,” says chief Kim Baird. “We can enjoy what other communities have had the ability to do for the past century or so, right? We are a player.” Tsawwassen band paves way for controversial mini-metropolis near Delta

Bill Baccus, Olympic National Park physical scientist reports that the glaciers in the North Olympic Peninsula's national park have shrunk by an average of 15 percent of their mass since the 1980s. “One glacier has completely disappeared.”  Olympic National Park glaciers continue to shrink, most recent study finds

The Seattle Times has online a nice map of Washington state’s newly reapportioned congressional districts— and demographic profiles of each district. Washington's new congressional districts  

And, from Ron Judd, two items in The Wrap--

“A Little Gas Turbo-Tax: Oil refiners reacted in abject horror to Gov. Chris Gregoire's call for a $1.50-a-barrel "fee" on state-produced petroleum products. Reason: They're unfairly targeted, tiny-profit-margin middlemen. Just like every other last soul involved in the oil-production chain, from drillers to station owners to CEOs and stockholders. Further evidence that all those hundreds of billions in oil-company profits are simply being dumped into a big hole somewhere.”

“Ding-dong drivers scrambling to avoid toll really take the cake: Just a small suggestion to all you local drivers who, feeling an urge to get from the Eastside to downtown or vice versa, make the reasoned, logical decision that it would be much better to drive around, going 10 miles out of your way, burning a quarter-tank of gas, pumping out enough pollutants to make Bothell smell like Gary, Ind., and turning Interstate 5 from Lake City Way south into a WallyPark annex — just to save a whopping two or three bucks:

Suck it up and pay the lousy 520 toll, already.”

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 300 AM PST MON JAN 16 2012
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM NOON PST TODAY THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
TODAY
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...RISING TO 15 TO 25 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT...BUILDING TO 2 TO 5 FT IN THE
 AFTERNOON. W SWELL 7 FT AT 10 SECONDS. ISOLATED SHOWERS OR SNOW SHOWERS IN THE MORNING...THEN SHOWERS IN THE AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...BECOMING NW 5 TO 10 KT AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 9 SECONDS. SHOWERS.

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1 comment:

  1. Mike - a couple of your items today got me to thinking back, again, about that first Earth Day and what was going on then. It strikes me that there was very little concern regarding our oceans and near shores. The water pollution issues were much about lakes and rivers and there wasn't even much study of oceans then.

    But now it is a huge activity and certainly recognized as an important subject to know scientific details about and to treat it well. Even arguments about aquafish-farming tend to swirl around impacts on the oceans, for example.

    And so for me, even though this is "hard budget times" and "hard economic times", the trajectory is in the good direction and the force is with us and we have much reason to be optimistic and keep shoulders to the wheel - so to speak!

    ReplyDelete