Wednesday, May 31, 2017

5/31 NDP-Green gov't, BC pipe, WA carbon, salmon smell, boat poop, safe seafood, oil spill data

Cabezon [Photo: Steve Lonhart, SIMoN/MBNMS]
Cabezon Scorpaenichtys marmoratus
One of the largest scuplins, ranging from Southeastern Alaska to Baja California, the cabezon can grow to over 30 inches and 15 pounds and is often encountered by divers in rocky areas near wrecks and in kelp beds. Adult spawns during winter; red eggs laid in large masses on rocks or seaweed, intertidal to subtidal. Juvenile (found near shore) is often splotched shades of pink and red; blends with pink encrusted algae. Feeds on isopods, crustaceans, fishes and mollusks. Hunted by scuba divers and anglers. Eggs are toxic. (Marine Life of Puget Sound, the San Juans, and the Strait of Georgia)

NDP-Green alliance to focus on electoral reform, stopping Kinder Morgan and banning big money
British Columbia's NDP and Green parties have signed a detailed agreement outlining how they will work together in government for the next four years. The 10-page accord outlines dozens of policy issues that two sides will work on. Both parties have pledged to work to stop the federally approved $7.4-billion Kinder Morgan pipeline project that would triple the amount of bitumen moved from just north of Edmonton to B.C.'s coast…. The pact will only come into effect if Premier Christy Clark resigns, or if the Liberals are defeated in a confidence motion in the legislature. Richard Zussman and Karin Larsen report. (CBC)

Beginning of the end: a chastened Clark acknowledges her premiership is likely coming to a close 
Changes of government in Canada are often quick, dramatic affairs: Years of rule crashing down in a few hours, a contrite loser accepting democracy at one rally, an exuberant victor heralding the dawn of a new political era at another. This is not that. But 22 days after the votes were cast in British Columbia's seemingly never-ending provincial election, a turning point was reached. Justin McElroy reports. (CBC) And: Trudeau stands by decision on Trans Mountain pipeline despite B.C. result  (CBC)

Despite Trump rollbacks, Washington state moves ahead on pollution limits
Even as the Trump administration seeks to roll back Obama-era rules to curb greenhouse-gas emissions at coal-fired power plants, Washington state is forging ahead with its own rules to cap carbon pollution from big industrial facilities. But the state faces legal challenges as it begins requiring large polluters to gradually reduce carbon emissions over time to combat climate change. Four natural-gas utilities and eight industry groups are seeking to invalidate Washington’s so-called clean-air rule, which took effect in January and affects such facilities as power plants, fuel and natural-gas distributors, oil refineries and manufacturers. A Thurston County Superior Court judge is set to hear arguments Friday on one aspect of the case. Arguments on the merits of the challenge are expected later. Phuong Le reports. (Associated Press)

Salmon's sense of smell suffers as seas sour, Seattle scientists say
…. Salmon are starting to lose their sense of smell and their fear of predators, according to research from federal and university scientists in Seattle. Their preliminary work, presented in May at a symposium on ocean acidification at the University of Washington, documents yet another way carbon dioxide emissions are messing with the world's oceans. UW post-doc Chase Williams said changing ocean chemistry is making it harder for salmon to smell danger. Salmon use smell to navigate, to hunt and to avoid predators. John Ryan reports. (KUOW)

President's EPA counsel calls meeting over boat discharge in Puget Sound
The Washington Department of Ecology is near the end of an effort to ban boats from discharging raw and partially treated sewage into Puget Sound. Except, the waters may soon muddy. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's senior counsel called a meeting with Ecology Director Maia Bellon Wednesday morning…. The Regional EPA director has already approved the designation of a "No Discharge Zone." The process is still awaiting a public comment period, and boats will get five years to comply…. President Donald Trump's EPA counsel is reacting to a petition from Washington maritime stakeholders. They're critical of the NDZ designation, arguing it will be too costly for maritime business and doesn't do much to stop pollution. It will require some boats spend $175,000 in upgrades for storage tanks. Alison Morrow reports. (KING)

Most Of The Imported Seafood We Eat Isn't Inspected 
Hawaii experienced a hepatitis outbreak last year due to tainted scallops and may be on the verge of another due to bad ahi….. The fact that tainted scallops and ahi made it into Hawaii’s food supply is hardly a surprise: The FDA lets in the vast majority of imported seafood without so much as a cursory inspection. Saddled with budget constraints, the FDA typically inspects less than 3 percent of the more than 5 billion pounds of imported seafood each year — and tests even less for pathogens like E. coli, hepatitis A and salmonella. Rui Kaneya reports. (Honolulu Civil Beat)

Now Available: Pacific States/British Columbia Oil Spill Data Summary
The Pacific States/British Columbia Oil Spill Task Force has just completed our Summary of West Coast Oil Spill Data for 2016. The Task Force began collecting data in 2002 on oil spills of 42 gallons or larger in AK, HI, WA, OR and CA. We have been compiling details on the volume, location, medium impacted and cause of crude and non-crude spills annually ever since. The data is compiled using the Task Force’s Data Dictionary, also available on our website.  In 2016, we began tracking the number of small spills (smaller than 42 gallons) and our first year of this data is provided on pg. 6 of the summary. View and download from the Oil Spill Task Force site. Sarah Brace reports. (Oil Spill Task Force)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  300 AM PDT WED MAY 31 2017  

TODAY
 E WIND TO 10 KT BECOMING N IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1  FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 4 FT AT 15 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS IN THE  AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
 NE WIND TO 10 KT BECOMING E AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1  FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 5 FT AT 14 SECONDS. SHOWERS LIKELY.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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