Friday, May 19, 2017

5/19 Mount St. Helens, orca celebrations, Anna's hummingbird, fossil fuel export study

Mount St. Helens, July 1980 eruption [Jack Smith/AP]
Mount St. Helens erupted 37 years ago on May 18, 1980
It’s the 37th anniversary of when Mount St. Helens erupted, killing 57 people. The eruption on May 18, 1980, caused the largest landslide in recorded history, knocked down trees 17 miles away, stripped nearly all vegetation from more than 230 square miles and caused more than $1 billion in damages. Stacia Glenn reports. (News Tribune of Tacoma) See also: What 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens looked like from space  Benjamin Woodward reports. (Seattle Times)

Orca celebrations and environmental learning are filling our calendar
From killer whales to native plants, it’s a potpourri of activities and events I would like to share with you. June is Orca Month. But first, on Saturday, we can celebrate the 15th anniversary of the remarkable rescue of a young killer whale named Springer. Also coming in June are gatherings small and large, including a water-based festival in Silverdale later in the month. This Saturday, May 20, folks will come together to celebrate Springer — the lost baby orca who was rescued and returned to her home in British Columbia. The 15th anniversary of the rescue will be commemorated on Vashon Island, at the Vashon Theatre, 17723 Vashon Highway SW. Chris Dunagan reports. (Watching Our Water Ways)

Anna's hummingbird named Vancouver's permanent city bird 
Results from the most important election held in B.C. this year have been announced: Anna's hummingbird has been named the City of Vancouver's official bird following an online vote. Anna's hummingbird beat out the northern flicker, spotted towhee and varied thrush for the title, taking 42 per cent of the vote. (CBC)

Why Whatcom Council wants $150K study into fossil fuel exports from Cherry Point
A study into what Whatcom County can and can’t do when it comes to fossil fuel exports moving through the community drew sharp criticism when it went before the County Council Tuesday night. Opponents, many of them refinery workers at Cherry Point, said it would hurt the ability to compete and ultimately lead to job loss. Council members said the proposal to spend $150,000 to study the county’s authority to limit negative impacts on safety, transportation, the economy and the environment from crude oil, coal, liquefied petroleum gases, and natural gas exports from Cherry Point was being misrepresented. Kie Rleyea reports. (Bellingham Herald)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  318 AM PDT FRI MAY 19 2017  

TODAY
 LIGHT WIND BECOMING NW 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND  WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT AT 5 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
 W WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 4 FT  AT 5 SECONDS. A SLIGHT CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
SAT
 W WIND 10 TO 20 KT BECOMING NW IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND  WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT 6 SECONDS. A SLIGHT CHANCE OF  SHOWERS IN THE MORNING.
SAT NIGHT
 W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL  4 FT AT 5 SECONDS.
SUN
 LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. W SWELL 4 FT AT  5 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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