Thursday, November 3, 2016

11/3 Kiwi, DAPL reroute, "Blob" hangover, world whale health, KM 'parallel' panel

Fall bounty (Laurie MacBride)
When Life Hands You Kiwis
Laurie MacBride in Eye on Environment writes: "Fifteen years ago, one of the selling features of our new home was its extensive food garden. From artichokes all the way to zucchini, there was an abundance of veggies and a diversity of berries, vine and tree fruits. Pure bliss for two mostly-vegetarian foodies with itchy green thumbs! But sometimes you should be careful what you wish for – our Hardy kiwis (Actinidia arguta) being a case in point…. " (read more)

In major shift, new route for Dakota Access Pipeline under review, Obama says
In a dramatic move after months of protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline, President Obama on Wednesday said a reroute of the pipeline is under consideration to account for Native American concerns. “My view is that there is a way for us to accommodate sacred lands of Native Americans. And I think that right now, the Army Corps (of Engineers) is examining whether there are ways to reroute this pipeline,” Obama said in an interview with Now This News. “We are going to let it play out several more weeks and determine whether or not this can be resolved in a way that I think is properly attentive to the traditions of First Americans,” the president said. Lynda Mapes reports. (Seattle Times)

The Blob, Hangover Edition: Lingering Pool Of Warm Ocean Water Messing With Us
A vast pool of warmer-than-normal ocean water off of the West Coast continues to mess with our weather and sea life. It's nicknamed "The Blob.” University of Washington research scientist and Washington State Climatologist Nick Bond coined the name for The Blob when he first noticed it offshore in 2014. It has swelled and waned and shifted around since. "The Blob is fading, but it is like a New Year's Day hangover that is kind of lingering especially for the marine ecosystem," Bond said. "It is taking its sweet time going away." The Blob has several important effects. It warms the air that prevailing winds carry our way off the ocean. It also disrupts the ocean food web, which shows up in seabird die offs, harmful algal blooms and starving marine mammals. Tom Banse reports. (KNKX)

Mixed prospects for world's whales, meeting told
As concerns rise about the West Coast's southern resident orca population, an international meeting is offering a mix of optimism and lament for cetacean species around the world. OrcaLab director Paul Spong returned this week from the International Whaling Commission's meeting in Slovenia. Spong told On the Island host Gregor Craigie the IWC meeting heard that populations of great whales, including North Pacific blue whales and humpbacks, are rebounding. Meanwhile, he said "the news for small whales, small cetaceans is, in many cases, quite disastrous." Deborah Wilson reports. (CBC)

Kinder Morgan pipeline ‘parallel’ panel panned by environmentalists
a coalition of environmental groups is attacking the credibility of a federal panel report that is to be made public Thursday on Kinder Morgan’s $6.8-billion pipeline expansion project. The three-person panel was appointed earlier this year as a “parallel” review process along with the National Energy Board’s more detailed and formal review of the project proposal. The NEB, which was criticized by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals when they were in opposition, recommended approval of the controversial pipeline expansion, subject to 157 conditions. Trudeau’s new panel was intended to solicit more input from the public and First Nations on the company’s plan to triple the Edmonton-to-Burnaby pipeline system to 890,000 barrels a day. Peter O'Neil reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Extremely heavy sunfish spotted in Squaxin Passage
A fisherman spotted a very large sunfish last Sunday in Squaxin Passage. Fisherman Jim Byrne told Washington’s Department of Fish & Wildlife he was looking for cutthroat trout when the huge Ocean Sunfish swam pass. The sunfish is also known by its Latin name Mola mola. South Puget Sound fish biologist James Losee says the Mola mola is one of the heaviest known bony fishes in the world. An average adult fish weights 545 to 2,205 pounds, but some have grown to 3,500 to almost 5,000 pounds. (KCPQ)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  300 AM PDT THU NOV 3 2016  

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR WIND IN EFFECT UNTIL NOON PDT TODAY

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY FOR HAZARDOUS SEAS IN EFFECT FROM NOON PDT
 TODAY THROUGH FRIDAY AFTERNOON  
TODAY
 SE WIND 15 TO 25 KT...BECOMING 5 TO 15 KT IN THE AFTERNOON.  WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 11 FT AT 14 SECONDS...BUILDING TO  17 FT AT 14 SECONDS IN THE AFTERNOON. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
TONIGHT
 SE WIND TO 10 KT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 16 FT  AT 15 SECONDS...SUBSIDING TO 13 FT AT 14 SECONDS AFTER MIDNIGHT.

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