Tuesday, November 29, 2016

11/29 BC pipe decision, oil spills, green abuse app, sewer overflow, Saanich dead zone, beluga deaths

Anna's hummer (Gregg Thomnpson/BirdNote)
Who Was Anna, The namesake of the Anna's Hummingbird?
The Anna's Hummingbird is the only hummer that stays in the Northwest and West for the winter. How did this lovely jewel get its name? Anna's Hummingbird was named for Princess Anna de Belle Massena. John James Audubon himself was charmed by her, but it was actually naturalist René Primevère Lesson who named the bird in her honor.

Ottawa to announce decisions today on Northern Gateway, Line 3 pipelines
The federal cabinet is expected to announce its decision Tuesday on two major Enbridge-backed pipeline projects — Line 3 and the controversial Northern Gateway, CBC News has confirmed. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his fellow ministers reached their decision last week, but held off publicly announcing their position until this week, after Trudeau returned from a trip to Africa for la Francophonie summit. A third pipeline, Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain, will also be reviewed at a regularly scheduled cabinet meeting in Ottawa, CBC News has learned. John Paul Tasker reports. (CBC)

Can we contain oil spills? The answer is in the sheen
If the Trudeau government approves the expansion of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline, B.C.'s oil cleanup industry will be in line for the biggest infusion of cash in its history. Kinder Morgan will be forced to fund the majority of a $200-million spill-response upgrade on the West Coast for new bases, equipment and 150 staff. Harder to quantify is how much confidence people should have that crews can actually remove oil from water if a major tanker spill occurs. Chris Brown and Chris Corday report. (CBC) See also:  Timeline of the sinking and recovery of the Nathan E. Stewart Justin McElroy reports. From Day 1 to Day 33, a look at why and how the process took as long as it did. (CBC)

New app seeks to crowdsource reporting of B.C. environmental abuses 
When it comes to protecting the environment in British Columbia, the most powerful tool available may soon be your smartphone. The BC Wildlife Federation is hoping a new app it developed with researchers at the University of British Columbia – Okanagan will be used by tens of thousands of people to record and report environmental abuses across the province. The app, released by the BCWF Monday, comes after years of budget cuts at both the provincial and federal levels that left environmental agencies with reduced enforcement capabilities. Mark Hume reports. (Globe and Mail)

Seattle, King County to pay for sewage flow into local waters
The City of Seattle and King County have been cited for discharging sewage into local bodies of water beyond allowable limits. The Department of Ecology has fined King County $63,500 and the City of Seattle $33,500. Ecology essentially found that the city and county discharged sewage into neighboring bodies of water beyond what is allowed…. King County was cited for 23 violations, and Seattle was cited for 10 violations. All incidents happened throughout 2015. Ecology found that King County exceeded pollutant limits from its treatment plants 18 times. Ecology also notes that two out of the four county treatment plants were found in violation of solids removal limits. Dyer Oxley reports. (KIRO)

Saanich Inlet offers scientists hints to oceans’ ‘dead zones’
Scientists from around the world are looking to the Saanich Inlet for clues about new ocean “dead zones.” More than 20 researchers from Canada and abroad are involved in a new project studying the inlet, which is a naturally occuring oxygen-minimum zone, or “dead zone,” almost devoid of marine life. The data could help scientists and policy-makers understand what to expect, as global temperatures rise and new dead zones appear around the globe, said Jeff Sorensen, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Victoria…. The Saanich Inlet is a deep glacial fjord. Its entrance is very shallow, which prevents water from mixing with the Strait of Georgia, except near the surface. The inlet’s deeper water stays where it is, Sorensen said. Amy Smart reports. (Times Colonist)

Scientists, police called in over Vancouver Aquarium's beluga deaths
The deaths of two beluga whales – a mother and calf in the same tank – within two weeks at the Vancouver Aquarium have sparked a global mystery, with police being consulted, and marine experts examining possible causes that include the animals’ food, an infection or even poisoning. The facility has kept whales since the 1960s, when it acquired its first orca, and several have died in that time, but never two so close together. Necropsies have so far failed to pinpoint a cause of death, and aquarium staff said they had not ruled anything out and had been in contact with the police. Ian Bailey reports. (Globe and Mail)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  230 AM PST TUE NOV 29 2016  
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH
 WEDNESDAY EVENING  
TODAY
 E WIND 5 TO 15 KT...RISING TO 15 TO 25 KT THIS AFTERNOON.  WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS...BUILDING TO 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 11 FT AT  15 SECONDS...SUBSIDING TO 9 FT AT 14 SECONDS THIS AFTERNOON.
TONIGHT
 E WIND 15 TO 25 KT...BECOMING S AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND  WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 7 FT AT 11 SECONDS. RAIN.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato at salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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