Tuesday, October 25, 2016

10/25 Owl, sunk tug, pipe protest, BC sea gate, flushing, Duwamish Alive!, Edmonds Marsh

‘Owl’ a captivating peek at the wise-looking birds
“You do not find owls,” writes Paul Bannick in his new book, “Owl: A Year in the Lives of North American Owls.” Instead, “owls find you.” Bannick, a Magnolia resident and “fourth-generation Seattleite,” is a wildlife photographer whose work has won many awards and appeared in numerous books (including his own previous book, “The Owl and the Woodpecker”), newspapers, magazines and calendars. And he’s long been captivated by owls. Moira Macdonald reports. (Seattle Times)

Divers provide clearer idea of damage to sunken tug on B.C. coast
A report says two tanks containing oil or contaminants from a submerged tug west of Bella Bella, off British Columbia’s central coast, were either torn open or severely damaged when the vessel ran aground. Despite bad weather that has complicated salvage efforts, divers were able to check the bottom of the Nathan E. Stewart on Sunday, as it rests in nine metres of water in a channel about 500 kilometres north of Vancouver. A joint situation report issued by the American tug owner and federal, provincial and First Nations groups says divers found the lube tank torn and pumped out nothing but water on Sunday from the severely damaged bilge tank. (Canadian Press) See also: Coast Guard chief defends response to sunken tug in B.C.   Chris Brown and Chris Corday report. (CBC)

Police issue 99 trespass citations during pipeline protest on Parliament Hill
The Liberal government's conflicting climate and pipeline policies were thrown into sharp relief Monday as more than 200 protesters marched on Parliament Hill demanding Prime Minister Justin Trudeau reject any new oilsands infrastructure. The protest resulted in the brief detention of 99 individuals, all of them issued citations by the RCMP for trespassing after climbing over police barricades near the foot of the Peace Tower. The immediate focus of the demonstration was the proposed expansion of Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline from Alberta to Burnaby, B.C., which the Liberals have said they'll decide upon by mid-December. Bruce Cheadle reports. (Canadian Press)

Vancouver eyes dikes, even a sea gate, to handle rising ocean levels
The City of Vancouver is floating the idea of constructing a sea gate — a storm surge barrier — under the Burrard Bridge to prevent future flooding of Granville Island and the False Creek Flats, from the coastline to Clark Drive. With the local sea level projected to rise by as much as a metre over the next century and the one-two punches of storm surges and king tides already hammering coastal infrastructure, staff are preparing options to present to councillors next month.  Those options range from doing nothing and hoping for the best to intricate and complex solutions. And the options vary by neighbourhood. The most significant among them would be a sea gate at the mouth of False Creek. Sea gates are large, complex, and often-expensive, barriers that can be closed as needed to hold back surging seas and protect valuable, low-lying land. The best-known examples are in the Netherlands, including its Oosterscheldekering, a three-kilometre-long structure that some herald as a wonder of the world. Matt Robinson reports. (Vancouver Sun)

To flush or not to flush?
Metro Vancouver is stepping up the fight to prolong the life of the region's sewer pipes by educating people who dump grease, fats and oil down the drain. "At this point, we don't consider anything flushable other than the three P's: pee, poo and toilet paper," says Devin Kiyonaga, a project engineer for liquid waste services at Metro Vancouver. Many products claim to be flushable, but the region says they can become costly problems, especially when combined with grease in sewer pipes. David Horemans reports. (CBC)

If you like to watch: See how hundreds of Duwamish Alive! volunteers gave TLC to our river & its watershed
So much happened in West Seattle this weekend … but we would argue, this is the most important. On the Duwamish River and in its watershed, hundreds of volunteers gathered to offer some help via the twice-yearly Duwamish Alive! habitat restoration and cleanup gatherings.  Leda Costa reports. (West Seattle Blog)

Mayor weighs in on marsh setbacks: Says 50-foot buffer ‘a real world solution’
Rebuffing the Edmonds City Council’s Sept. 28 vote, Edmonds Mayor Dave Earling on Monday announced that he has sided with the Washington State Department of Ecology in supporting a narrower buffer for the Edmonds Marsh. In a letter to Washington State Department of Ecology Director Maia D. Bellon, Earling said that the Ecology Department’s proposed 65-foot setback (50-foot buffer with a 15-foot building setback) is the best option for protecting the marsh. The city council by a 4-3 vote on Sept. 28 approved a 125-foot setback (a 110-foot buffer and a 15-foot setback). In taking that vote, the council rejected the Ecology Department’s requested change to the council-approved 100-foot buffer in the city’s original Shoreline Master Program (SMP), stating that a 50-foot buffer and 15-foot setback is more consistent with the Edmonds Marsh Category II wetland classification. (My Edmonds News)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  300 AM PDT TUE OCT 25 2016  

GALE WARNING IN EFFECT UNTIL NOON PDT TODAY
 
TODAY
 E WIND 25 TO 35 KT...BECOMING SE 15 TO 25 KT IN THE  AFTERNOON. COMBINED SEAS 13 TO 16 FT WITH A DOMINANT PERIOD OF  13 SECONDS. SHOWERS.
TONIGHT
 E WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. SW SWELL 13 FT  AT 12 SECONDS...SUBSIDING TO 10 FT AT 11 SECONDS AFTER MIDNIGHT. A  SLIGHT CHANCE OF SHOWERS IN THE EVENING...THEN A CHANCE OF SHOWERS  AFTER MIDNIGHT.

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