Wednesday, October 12, 2016

10/12 Bil C-228, pipe protest, Vic stormwater, SRKW return, deadly 'shroom, greasy pipes, Clallam MRC

Captain James T. Kirk (The Guardian)
Captain Kirk beams in to back wild salmon protection bill
Fin Donnelly has landed a big fish in his campaign to protect B.C.'s wild salmon. This morning, the Port Moody—Coquitlam M.P. unveiled a video message from William Shatner — Captain Kirk himself — encouraging Canadians to rally behind Donnelly's private members bill. "Wild salmon," said the 85-year-old Canadian actor, "are a national treasure. But their future is in jeopardy. They are under threat from sea lice and disease from open net farming." Bill C-228 proposes the federal government amend the Fisheries Act to require all open net fin-fish farms on the Pacific Coast to transition to closed containment systems within five years. Karin Larsen reports. (CBC)

Northwest Activists Arrested After Shutting Down Canada-To-US Oil Pipelines 
Protesters -- all from the Pacific Northwest -- were arrested Tuesday at all five sites across the northern U.S. where pipelines deliver oil from Canada’s oil sands to American refineries. The pipelines cross the U.S.-Canadian border in Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota and Washington state. Across the country nine people were arrested. They all came from Washington and Oregon. Five of the arrested were activists who closed the pipeline valves and four were people video-recording or livestreaming their actions, said Afrin Sopariwala of Climate Direct Action. Ashley Ahearn reports. (KUOW/EarthFix) See also: Activists arrested after shutting down oil pipeline in Anacortes  Allison Morrow reports. (KING)

Victoria issues new utility bill for stormwater runoff
A new utility bill will arrive in Victoria mailboxes this month. The city is now charging people separately for stormwater runoff that leaves their properties. Funds for dealing with stormwater in Victoria were previously collected through property taxes and were based on the value of a property.  The new user-pay system ties the cost of managing stormwater directly to how much water is expected to run off a particular property. Megan Thomas reports. (CBC)

If you like to watch: Photos: resident orca pods return to Puget Sound
The Southern Resident Killer Whales in the J and K pods have returned to Puget Sound. According to the Orca Network, both pods crossed Admiralty Inlet last week, and continued south towards Point No Point, near Hansville. Whale watchers said this move typically happens around this time of year. (KOMO)

Deadliest mushroom in world on the rise in B.C.
To the untrained eye, it's a plain-looking white mushroom, popping up in yards and boulevards of Vancouver, Victoria and the Fraser Valley. But experts recognize Amanita phalloides — the so-called death cap mushroom that poisoned someone in Victoria this week — as the deadliest mushroom in the world, responsible for an estimated 90 per cent of fatal poisonings worldwide. Twenty years ago, it hadn't been spotted in B.C. But now, the death cap is growing in prevalence in urban areas of the South Coast, prompting a warning from health officials last month. Lisa Johnson reports. (CBC)

Richmond sewers like 'blocked arteries' with grease buildup
Metro Vancouver is stepping up the fight to prolong the life of the region's sewer pipes by educating people who dump grease, fats and oil down the drain. Devin Kiyonaga, a project engineer for liquid waste services at Metro Vancouver, said while grease in the pipes is a region-wide problem, it's specifically targeting Richmond. "Richmond probably has some of the worst issues, because they're so flat. You don't have a lot of flow, it's slow moving. There's also a lot of cooking with oils in that area," he explained. While dumping grease down the drain can cause problems for individual homeowners, it can also expand out into the larger sewer system. In fact, Metro Vancouver spends $2 million every year in the region to repair damage caused by grease. (CBC)

Funding renewed for Clallam County Marine Resources Committee
Clallam County has renewed an annual agreement for the continued operation of the Clallam Marine Resources Committee. The three commissioners Tuesday approved the one-year, $72,050 grant from the state Department of Ecology to fund the committee’s restoration, conservation and education projects. Such projects include Olympia oyster restoration in Sequim Bay, marine debris removal, kelp monitoring and oil spill preparedness, prevention and response, according to the agreement. The committee also sponsors community events and runs an internship program. Rob Ollikainen reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  305 AM PDT WED OCT 12 2016  

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH LATE TONIGHT
 
TODAY
 E WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 2 FT  AT 14 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
 SE WIND 20 TO 30 KT...EASING LATE. WIND WAVES 3 TO 5  FT...SUBSIDING. W SWELL 3 FT AT 14 SECONDS. RAIN.

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