Tuesday, January 5, 2016

1/5 Salish Sea energy, BC LNG, warming mussels, Wallace R., WA Conservation Corps

Humpback (Kyle Noble/CBC)
If you like to watch: Humpback whales play hide-and-seek with B.C. boaters
A Victoria man and his family were fishing for prawns but managed to attract a much bigger sea creature. Kyle Noble captured footage of a pair of humpback whales on Jan. 1 as they breached close to his his boat near Gabriola Island. Tamara Baluja reports. (CBC)

Energy development impacts for the Salish Sea
Energy-related developments in the Salish Sea between Washington and British Columbia underscore the need for a transnational approach to assessing the risks to the entire ecosystem, according to a study by the SeaDoc Society, a program of the UC Davis Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, and the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, part of the area's indigenous Coast Salish people. The study, published in December in the journal PLOS ONE, identified six development projects proposed and underway in both Canada and the U.S. that would increase marine vessel traffic in the Salish Sea. They include plans to transport coal, shale oil, crude oil and natural gas. (Phys.org)

LNG investment may be too late after 2016, companies say
The organization representing contractors and service providers to the B.C. oil and gas industry says time is running out to invest in LNG, after what it calls one of the worst years for LNG in the province. The B.C. government has made no secret of its intentions to back major LNG projects, saying the investment will yield money to pay back the province's debt and tens of thousands of jobs. But skeptics have continually criticized the government for falling behind on its plans to grow the province's LNG sector. Now, the executive director of Energy Services B.C,, says contractors and firms servicing the industry need to know now whether or not that investment is coming. (CBC)

Study focuses on effect of warming waters on mussels
Though they're less glamorous than oysters, mussels dominate rocky coastlines and support aquaculture worldwide. Now Washington Sea Grant-supported researchers at University of Washington's Friday Harbor Labs are investigating potential climate-related threats to the amazingly tough mussel threads that anchor them to wave-pounded rocks and docks. The unassuming but commercially valuable mussel dominates temperate seas worldwide, clinging to rocks and docks by a cluster of thread-like anchors called the byssus or "the beard." The byssus's unique protein matrix gives each thread extraordinary strength, even in salt water. But will byssal threads still hold fast as the seas become warmer and more acidic? Supported by Washington Sea Grant, UW biology professor Emily Carrington is trying to answer that question and determine whether food supply and spawning may also affect byssal strength. The answers she's finding aren't simple, but they're sometimes surprising. (Islands Sounder)

Tulalips, Forterra to preserve land near Wallace River for salmon
A 1.25-mile stretch of forested land along the Wallace River will now be protected forever as salmon habitat. The land, covering 121 acres on five parcels, was purchased by the environmental nonprofit Forterra in July for $490,000. Forterra, formerly known as the Cascade Land Conservancy, transferred the property to the Tulalip Tribes in November for future management. A conservation easement ensures the property will never be developed. Chris Winters reports. (Everett Herald)

Conservation Corps mixes training with environmental work
While wrestling with English ivy on the cold ground of a city park Monday, Hannah Campbell said she never imagined her career path leading her here, but she doesn't mind. Campbell, 23, and Jessica Danielson, 24, are part of a six-member Washington Conservation Corps crew that is working in Skagit County for the third consecutive month. The two women, who have degrees in environmental science, said they are thankful for the opportunity to earn a paycheck while playing in the dirt. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  230 AM PST TUE JAN 5 2016

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH WEDNESDAY MORNING  

TODAY
 E WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 9 FT AT  19 SECONDS. RAIN LIKELY IN THE MORNING...THEN RAIN IN THE AFTERNOON.

TONIGHT
 SE WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 11 FT  AT 16 SECONDS. RAIN.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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