Thursday, January 28, 2016

1/28 NW quake, ocean plastic, spill response, new pipe rules, Wolf Bauer, Vic sewer

Elwha Jan 25 (Anne Shaffer/Coastal Watershed Institute)
‘Really Big One’ article puts NW earthquake risk on White House agenda
For decades, geologists, emergency managers and media in the Pacific Northwest have been warning that the region will someday be slammed by a megaquake and tsunami that could be the country’s worst natural disaster. But it took an East Coast magazine to finally elevate the issue onto the White House agenda. Inspired in large part by an article in The New Yorker in the summer, the Obama administration is hosting an Earthquake Resilience Summit on Tuesday — and is expected to underscore its support for an earthquake early warning system on the West Coast. Sandi Doughton reports. (Seattle Times) See also: Earthquake anniversary draws attention  At about 9 p.m. 316 years ago, what scientists call the Great Cascadia Earthquake rocked the Pacific Northwest. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald) And also: Earthquake detection: It's time to finish the network, researcher says  (CBC)

If you like to watch: A Place at the Table: Benefits of Beach Restoration
Friends of the San Juans recently completed a beach restoration project on Brown Island with many partners including three private shoreline landowners and local contractors. The video, “A Place at the Table: Benefits of Beach Restoration,” showcases the project, the people involved and its goal of reestablishing a healthy, functioning shoreline and habitat for fish. (Friends of the San Juans)

By 2050, there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans, study says
There is a lot of plastic in the world’s oceans…. if it was bagged up and arranged across all of the world’s shorelines, we could build a veritable plastic barricade between ourselves and the sea. But that quantity pales in comparison with the amount that the World Economic Forum expects will be floating into the oceans by the middle of the century. If we keep producing (and failing to properly dispose of) plastics at predicted rates, plastics in the ocean will outweigh fish pound for pound in 2050, the nonprofit foundation said in a report Tuesday [1/18]. Sarah Kaplan reports. (Washington Post)

Oil spill responders overstating containment capability: B.C. conservation group
A B.C. conservation group is challenging statements made by the company responsible for containing oil spills on the South Coast, saying it has overstated its spill response capability. "I would echo what the Ministry of Environment says, that we are not ready for a spill on this coast," said Lori Walter with the Raincoast Conservation Foundation, pointing to Western Canada Marine Response Corporation (WCMRC). As National Energy Board hearings continue on the proposed expansion to Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain Pipeline, WCMRC says it could successfully contain a 10,000 ton oil spill within 10 days, as required by the federal government. (CBC)

Ottawa lays out new rules for pipeline, LNG projects
A revamped federal environmental review process aimed at restoring public faith in assessments like the current one involving the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion proposal got a cool reception Wednesday. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government announced a hybrid review process that allows the current National Energy Board review to wrap up its work on Kinder Morgan, though the federal cabinet will now have until December rather than August to rule on the project. The government said the delay will allow the government to meet its campaign pledge to give a broader assessment of the climate change impact of the project, as well as to ensure greater aboriginal consultation. Those twin objectives will apply to all projects being assessed by Ottawa until a permanent new system can be put in place, which according to Environment Minister Catherine McKenna could take “years.” Projects affected include TransCanada’s $16 billion Energy East pipeline to Eastern Canada, the Woodfibre LNG proposal for near Squamish and the Petronas-led Pacific NorthWest LNG proposal for near Prince Rupert. Peter O'Neil and Rob Shaw report. (Vancouver Sun) See also: Liberal pipeline policy presents 3 key problems  Tracy Johnson and Kyle Bakx analyze. (CBC)

Wolf Bauer, 103, mountaineer, environmentalist dies
Wolf Bauer, accomplished mountaineer and environmentalist with a passion for teaching and sharing, has died at 103. His work influenced generations of skiers, climbers and kayakers and led to protection of shoreline areas. Jack Broom reports. (Seattle Times)

Jensen cools heels on proposal to revisit McLoughlin sewage plant
The public needs an opportunity to digest the idea of taking a second look at locating a sewage-treatment plant at Esquimalt’s McLoughlin Point before politicians make any decisions, says Oak Bay’s mayor. Nils Jensen has withdrawn his motion that the Capital Regional District’s technical advisory panel be asked to examine the feasibility of locating a single regional sewage-treatment plant at McLoughlin Point, saying he would resubmit it for debate Feb. 10. Bill Cleverley reports. (Times Colonist)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-  300 AM PST THU JAN 28 2016  

GALE WARNING IN EFFECT UNTIL 6 AM PST EARLY THIS MORNING

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 6 AM PST THIS MORNING THROUGH
 THIS AFTERNOON  

TODAY
 S WIND 25 TO 35 KT...BECOMING SW 15 TO 25 KT EARLY IN THE  MORNING. WIND WAVES 4 TO 6 FT...SUBSIDING TO 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 18  FT AT 14 SECONDS...SUBSIDING TO 16 FT AT 14 SECONDS IN THE  AFTERNOON. RAIN IN THE MORNING...THEN SHOWERS LIKELY IN THE  AFTERNOON.

TONIGHT
 SW WIND 5 TO 15 KT...BECOMING SE AFTER MIDNIGHT. WIND  WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 16 FT AT 17 SECONDS. A CHANCE OF  SHOWERS.

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