Tuesday, July 7, 2015

7/7 Sockeye, green seafood, toxic mussels, BC LNG taxes, cetacean captives, heat & smoke, East Waterway

Hot sockeye (Vancouver Sun)
Stephen Hume: Heat wave adds to salmon’s migratory obstacles
Last straw? A tiny fraction of sockeye born in the Fraser River watershed survive the attentions of predators, animal and human. This year, add killer warm water to the mix. Stephen Hume writes. (Vancouver Sun)

Paul Allen unveils sustainable seafood program for restaurants
Paul Allen has a new cause: the sustainability of fish, in the oceans and on your restaurant plate. To that end, Allen has unveiled Smart Catch, a program certifying restaurants that commit to serving sustainable fish. To earn Smart Catch approval, restaurants will have to serve or be on their way to serving 90 percent sustainable fish. They’ll be listed on the website smartcatch.fish and receive a logo sticker to display in their window. (Establishments attaining 100 percent get a special label.) Bethany Jean Clement reports. (Seattle Times)

How algae blooms could take mussels off the menu
New research suggests that climate change could cause massive poisonous algae blooms, depleting already limited shellfishing industries. Could the solution be something as simple as seagrass? Joseph Dussault reports. (Christian Science Monitor)

LNG protected from tax hikes for 25 years in deal with B.C. government
The B.C. government has agreed to compensate a major liquefied natural gas project if it raises taxes on the LNG industry for a 25-year period after the plant starts shipping. Finance Minister Mike de Jong released details on Monday of the $36-billion deal it reached in May with Pacific NorthWest LNG, a consortium led by Malaysian energy giant Petronas which wants to build an LNG export terminal near Prince Rupert. (CBC) See also: Gitga'at First Nation launches legal challenge of Pacific Northwest LNG Gordon Hoekstra reports. (Vancouver Sun)

UBC marine biologist heads study on cetaceans in captivity
A marine biologist at the University of B.C. is heading a national study focused on evaluating the health of whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity. David Rosen and a team of researchers are looking at two related areas: developing criteria to determine the well being of cetaceans and then finding out how captivity affects them. Kevin Griffin reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Puget Sound cooldown coming this week
After five consecutive days of 90 degree temperatures in Seattle, a cooldown is on the way later this week…. A rapid cooling off is expected starting Thursday, dropping into the upper 70s Saturday and Sunday. (KING)
See also: Air quality in some parts of Lower Mainland comparable to Beijing   (CBC)

Cleanup begins at polluted Everett waterway
The East Waterway is finally getting cleaned up. Just don’t expect it to happen quickly. The waterway, an inlet off Possession Sound between the Port of Everett and Naval Station Everett, has long borne the brunt of industrial activity along the city’s waterfront. On June 30, the state Department of Ecology issued an agreement that begins the first stage of a multi-year cleanup process. The so-called Agreed Order between the Ecology department, the Port of Everett, Kimberly-Clark Worldwide Inc. and the state Department of Natural Resources lays out the order of events that will transpire over the next several years. Chris Winters reports. (Everett Herald)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 301 AM PDT TUE JUL 7 2015
TODAY
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 8 SECONDS. PATCHY FOG IN THE MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 2 FT OR LESS. W SWELL 3 FT AT 7 SECONDS. PATCHY FOG LATE.
--
"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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