Friday, July 10, 2015

7/10 Birds at risk, BC LNG, watersheds at risk, drought, Polley mine, fish at risk, steelhead

Rufous hummingbird (Grouse Mountain Refuge)
Rufous hummingbird population in North America appears to be declining
The rufous hummingbird population in North America appears to be declining, likely because their migratory patterns are being affected by development, according to a wildlife expert on Grouse Mountain. The Grouse Mountain Refuge for Endangered Wildlife has been studying the tiny creatures' migratory patterns and population over the past 10 years by catching them and attaching bands to their legs. (CBC) See also: Seabird population down 70 per cent around the world, say UBC researchers  Tiffany Crawford reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Ottawa says Fraser River LNG terminal requires federal environmental review
The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency has ruled that a proposed $175-million LNG export terminal on the Fraser River in Delta will require a federal assessment. The review is required because of the type of project and the possibility the project “may cause adverse environmental effects,” said the agency. The municipalities of Delta and Richmond and environmental groups have been calling for a federal review of the proposal by U.S.-based WesPac Midstream LLC. They remain concerned that B.C. will be granted a substitution, where a provincial review replaces the federal assessment. Gordon Hoekstra reports. (Vancouver Sun)

Five First Nations join forces to assess environmental impact of LNG exports
Five First Nations, including two groups that support Pacific NorthWest LNG, have joined forces to assess the environmental impact of B.C. liquefied natural gas exports proposed for the Prince Rupert region. Metlakatla, Kitselas, Gitxaala, Kitsumkalum and Gitga’at are members of the newly formed Tsimshian Environmental Stewardship Authority (TESA). Brent Jang reports. (Globe and Mail)

Stephen Hume: B.C. watersheds at risk, according to World Wildlife Fund report
Three of British Columbia’s four major watersheds are at high or moderate risk from the threats posed by climate change and fragmenting wildlife habitat, according to a new national report from the well-regarded World Wildlife Fund. It says the Fraser, B.C.’s largest and longest river, draining an area which by itself is larger than 38 of Europe’s countries, is at high risk overall because of pollution, habitat fragmentation and the presence of invasive species in the watershed. These risks are amplified by the impacts of climate change, habitat loss and the alteration of river flows. Stephen Hume reports. (Vancouver Sun)

As W. Wash. in 'severe drought' Seattle water supply outlook drops
Drought conditions are worsening in Western Washington as Seattle’s water supply outlook has changed from good to fair, according to Seattle Public Utilites. The Drought Monitor reports Western Washington’s drought is now considered severe.  At the start of 2015, 15 percent of the state was in a severe drought. On Wednesday, the state was at 86 percent. (KIRO)

Nanaimo, Parksville move to level 4 water restrictions with extreme drought conditions
A popular B.C. seaside tourist zone is so drought-stricken that faces the toughest water restrictions levied in B.C.so far. City officials say if people continue to water and powerwash at the current rate, Parksville and Nanaimo will run out of water…. The new restrictions affect Parksville and the District of Nanaimo — but not the city of Nanaimo which remains at Level 2 on the province's drought measurement system. The area relies on local rivers, which were already low because of a reduced snow pack. (CBC)

B.C. gives restricted OK for Mount Polley mine to reopen after tailings spill disaster
The British Columbia government has issued a conditional permit allowing the Mount Polley mine to reopen, but with restrictions. Mines Minister Bill Bennett said Thursday the permit is the first of three steps the mine must take before it can be authorized to operate fully. He said Mount Polley Mine Corp. must submit a long-term water treatment and discharge plan to the government by next June. (Canadian Press)

Record Heat Producing Deadly Conditions For Fish
Drought and record hot weather are producing lethal conditions for salmon and trout in rivers across the West. A recent survey released Wednesday of the lower reaches of 54 rivers in Oregon, California and Washington by the conservation group Wild Fish Conservancy showed nearly three-quarters had temperatures higher than 70 degrees, considered potentially deadly for salmon and trout. Jeff Barnard reports. (Associated Press) See also: Protections being taken to save fish from heat   Fishery managers are taking unprecedented steps to protect fish from potentially lethal conditions caused by the drought this summer. Amy Nile and Chris Winters report. (Everett Herald)

State to stop hatchery steelhead release in some Puget Sound streams, seeks public input
State fisheries managers are considering which streams in the Puget Sound region to use as wild steelhead management zones, meaning no hatchery fish would be released in those streams in an effort to conserve wild fish, according to a news release. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife will designate at least one wild steelhead management zone, or gene bank, in three Puget Sound regions, including North Puget Sound. Streams in the Skagit, Samish and Sauk watersheds are among those that may be considered. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Now, your weekend tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 306 AM PDT FRI JUL 10 2015
TODAY
W WIND TO 10 KT IN THE MORNING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 3 FT AT 18 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG IN THE
 MORNING.
TONIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT IN THE EVENING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 2 FT AT 17 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG
 AFTER MIDNIGHT. A SLIGHT CHANCE OF SHOWERS AFTER MIDNIGHT.
SAT
LIGHT WIND. WIND WAVES LESS THAN 1 FT. SW SWELL 2 FT AT 16 SECONDS. AREAS OF FOG IN THE MORNING. A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
SAT NIGHT
W WIND TO 10 KT IN THE EVENING...BECOMING LIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 2 FT AT 15 SECONDS.
SUN
LIGHT WIND...BECOMING W TO 10 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. WIND WAVES 1 FT OR LESS. SW SWELL 2 FT AT 14 SECONDS.

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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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