Wednesday, April 22, 2015

4/22 Earth Day, WA lege, climate works, spotted owl, endangered species, whale hunt, CA water, Port of PT

If you like to listen: Celebrate the Earth. It's Earth Day!
Celebrate the earth -- from a canyon in the West, where meadowlarks sing … to the Boundary Waters of Minnesota, where a pair of Common Loons returns to breed and raise their young and spring peepers sing for mates … to an old-growth hardwood forest in North Carolina, where warblers and vireos sing and woodpeckers drum. The soundscapes featured in today's show were recorded by Gordon Hempton and provided courtesy of QuietPlanet.com. (BirdNote)

Overtime: Washington Legislature going into special session
The House's budget chair said Tuesday Washington lawmakers will not finish their work by Sunday's deadline and will need a special session to work out the details on the state budget and adequately paying for public education. Gov. Jay Inslee agreed with Rep. Ross Hunter's assessment. But he said special session plans haven't been talked about yet. Donna Blankinship and Rachel La Corte report. (Associated Press)

U.S. recognizes 2 W. Washington climate-change projects
The federal government on Tuesday recognized two collaborative efforts in Western Washington that seek to conserve, restore and make lands more resilient to climate change. In the Puget Sound region, federal, state and county agencies are partnering to improve coastal watersheds. In the Snohomish River watershed, governments, tribes and nonprofits are working to restore and increase the storage capacity of flood plains and revive tidal wetland habitats. Western Washington was one of four regions recognized in the Tuesday joint announcement by the Interior Department, EPA and NOAA. The federal government is highlighting these regional efforts to showcase how partnerships can help prepare vulnerable lands for the effects of climate change. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times)

Feds consider “uplisting” spotted owl
The forest-dwelling bird that has become known for causing grief in the region’s logging communities is again under Endangered Species Act review. This time, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering whether to increase protection for the Northern spotted owl. Timber industry representatives worry the potential change could further restrict logging and actually take away from the decades-long efforts to restore the species. Kimberly Cauvel reports. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Humpback whales recovering, baby orcas being born, but plenty of species in peril
The eve of Earth Day 45 brought news that humpback whales, beloved attractions from waters between Maui and Lanai in Hawaii to Alaska’s Lynn Canal, are candidates to be taken off the endangered species list. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is proposing to de-list 10 species of humpbacks…. The Salish Sea has witnessed its own whale news in recent weeks.  Four baby whales have been born into the southern resident orca population, endangered by oil development and decline of its chief food — chinook salmon. The view elsewhere, particularly in Third World countries, is bleak. Joel Connelly reports. (SeattlePI.Com) See also: Transient orca population counted in big numbers off Vancouver Island (CBC)

Public comment sought on proposed Makah whale hunt with meeting set next Wednesday in Port Angeles
A public meeting on a draft environmental impact statement evaluating the Makah tribe's request to resume treaty-based hunting of gray whales is set in Port Angeles next week. The meeting will be from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 29, at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St. No registration is required. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries also will host a public meeting in Seattle on Monday. Public comment will be taken at both meetings. (Peninsula Daily News)

Stormwater: Port considers noncompliance fees
Port of Port Townsend commissioners and Al Cairns, environmental compliance officer, on April 8 discussed imposing fines for violating Best Management Practices (BMPs), rules designed to help reduce environmental damage. The port has invested $400,000 in a stormwater treatment system. "We're still by a large order of magnitude over our stormwater standards," Cairns said. Robin Dudley reports. (Port Townsend Leader)

William Shatner: Solve California drought with Seattle pipeline
For generations, water-hungry Southern California has jealously eyed the rainy Pacific Northwest as a potential source of the precious resource. And time after time, it has been rebuffed. When Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn in 1990 proposed digging aqueducts that would grab water from the Columbia and Snake rivers, Oregon Gov. Neil Goldschmidt responded: “I have the distinct impression that you are trying to steal my water.” Now actor William Shatner has waded in with his own improbable plan. Veronica Rocha reports. (LA Times)

Now, your tug weather--
WEST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA- 308 AM PDT WED APR 22 2015
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH THIS AFTERNOON
TODAY
W WIND 15 TO 25 KT. WIND WAVES 2 TO 4 FT. W SWELL 8 FT AT 10 SECONDS.
TONIGHT
W WIND 10 TO 20 KT...BECOMING SW. WIND WAVES 1 TO 3 FT. W SWELL 6 FT AT 11 SECONDS. A SLIGHT CHANCE OF RAIN AFTER
 MIDNIGHT.
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"Salish Sea News & Weather" is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato@salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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